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BC binding

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

I'm looking at picking up a side-country set-up this year for shorter BC trips that would also work on the hill.  I will probably go with a ski something like DPS 99 Pure, a K2 Coomback,  a K2 SideSeth or possibly a Hoji.  Lots of choice on skis, I know the how the trade-offs work for ski choice, and  I'll choose a ski for this set-up that compliments my current quiver.  My current resort skis include JJs, Bones, and now MX88s - really happy with these skis.  My current BC ski is the Dynafit Manaslu with Dynafit bindings, which I'll continue to use on longer outings.

 

My question is more related to bindings - my wish is to have a binding that would work for with either my usual ski boots (Solomon XC130) and BC boots (Scarpa Maestrale).  As far as I can tell, one binding that would work dual duty is the Diamir Freeride Pro.  I believe that the Marker Duke and F12 would also accept either boot sole, but I've used the Marker BC system before and really disliked the ski-to-travel change-over mechanism.  I don't believe that the new crop of side-country oriented bindings from Solomon or others accept BC boots with a lug sole, but I'm not sure about this.

 

Are there any other choices?  Should I reconsider Marker?  Any downside of the FR Pro?

 

Thanks for the feedback.


Edited by canadianskier - 9/6/12 at 1:10pm
post #2 of 9
Thread Starter 

I spoke with a friend today who said that the Solomon Guardian 16 has an easy to adjust toe height.  He used it last year and was impressed.  After a bit more digging, I also found a Blister review that indicated that the Guardian toe piece has an adjustable height.  All seems to be lining up for this binding.

post #3 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by canadianskier View Post

I'm looking at picking up a side-country set-up this year for shorter BC trips that would also work on the hill...Lots of choice on skis, I know the how the trade-offs work for ski choice, and  I'll choose a ski for this set-up that compliments my current quiver....

My question is more related to bindings - my wish is to have a binding that would work for with either my usual ski boots (Solomon XC130) and BC boots (Scarpa Maestrale).  As far as I can tell, one binding that would work dual duty is the Diamir Freeride Pro.  I believe that the Marker Duke and F12 would also accept either boot sole, but I've used the Marker BC system before and really disliked the ski-to-travel change-over mechanism.  I don't believe that the new crop of side-country oriented bindings from Solomon or others accept BC boots with a lug sole, but I'm not sure about this.

Are there any other choices?  Should I reconsider Marker?  Any downside of the FR Pro?

Thanks for the feedback.
You're on the right track with the FreeRide Pro, especially if you want the ability to change from locked to free heel without stepping out of the binding. That feature effectively nullifies anything from Marker, although it isn't necessary very often with an alpine rig. A new contender in the market this year is the Salomon Guardian / Atomic Tracker binding. It has the beef factor of the Duke and uses a metal frame. The metal frame doesn't add anything for downhill power, but will make edging on a traverse more solid. It can switch modes without exiting the binding like the FreeRide. The FR still beats 'em all for how easy it is to change the climbing post though.

Downside to the FreeRide is many folks consider it to be torsionally sloppy. That's a relative thing. Compared to Duke or Guardian it certainly is. Is it solid enough? Most think so. If you charge hard and huck, go with Guardian or Tracker. If you keep your feet on the ground you'll appreciate the lighter weight and ease of use of the FreeRide in most situations.

Lots more backcountry info at EarnYourTurns, like skins, beacons, etc.
post #4 of 9

I really like my Marker F12.  In practice, I don't find the changeover to be much of an issue.  They ski better than my Fritschi Diamers.  (can't speak to the newer Fritschis.)  

 

The binding skis really well, and is lighter than some of the other burly options.  

post #5 of 9
Most people take off their skis when the take off their skins. I've only met 1 person that doesn't in my life and I don't bend like that. The change over from ski and to ski is not that bad. Of course there is the guardian/tracker now (heavier) and soon the tyrolia adrenalin which has very little info. Those 3 can switch while clicked it.
post #6 of 9

I agree that for a binding in that category the taking-off ski thing isn't a dealbreaker. And it's not like you have to take both off at once. I've gone F12 and am pretty happy with the choice. When it comes time to think about possibly sacrificing some downhill performance for better touring, I think I'll skip right past the Fritschis and go straight to tech bindings. Think a lot of skiers are using that logic; looks to me like Fritschi's a little stuck in the middle now. 

post #7 of 9

Watch out for the guardian bindings:

http://www.wildsnow.com/8495/salomon-guardian-boots-backcountry/

 

FWIW the Duke/Baron is hard to beat for a quiver of one binding.. The Freeride Pro can be a bit fragile for day in day out on the hill use...

post #8 of 9

Ultimate setup:

 

http://bindingfreedom.com/DynaLook-Swap-Plates-1003.htm

 

 

Tour on Dynafits, ride the resort on looks.

Or get Dynaduke plates, use duke/baron/F12.  Lots of options.

post #9 of 9
Quote:
Most people take off their skis when the take off their skins. I've only met 1 person that doesn't in my life and I don't bend like that.

 

I'd say most people take off their skis when they need to put skins on.  I've seen one person ever manage to put skins on while wearing their skis, though it wasn't easy and they did it mostly to see if they could.

 

As far as transitioning from skinning to skiing everyone I ski with rips skins without removing their skis.  Piece of cake once you know how.  Of course there are times when it'd be great to be able to free the heel to get a bit of kick and glide without taking off one's skis.  That's one of the pleasures of telemark vs. tech bindings.

 

Personally I wouldn't be concerned with a binding that I have to take off to transition to climb/skin mode.  I would really hesitate to put heavy NON tech bindings on a light ski like the DPS Pure.  As Dostie mentions in his review the Guardian/Tracker weighs 6 1/2 pounds!  That's almost as much as the 99 Pure weighs all by its lonesome.  Light is right, especially in the backcountry... for sidecountry, maybe not as important.

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