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Summer Ski Storage Meltdown

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

Living in the SW desert, it probably gets close to 140 degrees in my garage during the summer months. Could temperatures like these possibly cause damage to our skis, boots and snowboards?

 

Does the position they are stored in matter as well; laying flat or on edge or vertical?

post #2 of 18
I would try to find a place inside your closet where the air cond is always working and the temperatures are not insane! Not sure if there is any problem but most people and all recommendations I've seen over the web would not recommend leaving the skis in such high temperatures
post #3 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bad Wolf View Post

Living in the SW desert, it probably gets close to 140 degrees in my garage during the summer months. Could temperatures like these possibly cause damage to our skis, boots and snowboards?

Does the position they are stored in matter as well; laying flat or on edge or vertical?

Just put plenty of wax on and think of it as hot boxing! smile.gif
post #4 of 18

I know storage in a hot shed or garage used to be the kiss of death for ski boots and bindings made in the 80s and 90s.  The plastic would get more brittle and sometimes crack on the first really cold day following that off season treatment.  I don't think hot boxing with the bindings on is a great idea either.  That degree of heat (see what I did there?) can cause all the lithium grease inside the bindings to turn fluid and run out of the springs and hinges inside.  It won't matter to serious racers that replace their gear frequently, but I wouldn't subject my bindings to that kind of heat without squirting some fresh grease in them before using them again.  All my gear now stays in climate controlled locations year round.  Haven't had any cracked bindings or boots since.  Had that happen pretty often when they stayed in the shed off season.  Probably also due to better plastics, but not taking any unnecessary chances.

 

In the cooler months condensation moisture is a factor to consider.  It attacks edges and the steel inside your bindings.  Granted they get wet in use, but being damp 24/7 for months at a time takes its toll.

post #5 of 18

I'm sure one of the scientist here can explain, but my limited knowledge of thermal cycling is you should avoid it (thermal cycling).  As a manufacturer, we do such things to weed out problems with our product; either workmanship issues or defective parts.  Everything sees some thermal cycling.  Most handle things well as long as you stay away from extremes.  Once you go from one extreme to another, you either need "beefy" things like cast iron or specialty products like Pyrex.  Think of what happens with the items we use to cook with.  One of the reasons boots take a beating is because while skiing, they'll go from our warm car, to the cold slope to the warm car, to the cold basement/garage etc. and that can be a temperature swing of 50 to 70 degrees.  Most plastics don't like that and will be stressed.  This stress will eventually cause cracks.  Better plastics last longer.  The activity level the plastics are seeing while thermal cycling will also affect how long they'll last.  Someone riding the tails of their skis isn't stressing their boots near as much as a racer or hard carver would.

 

Simmer in AZ you're going through the same temperature swing but at a higher temp; 140 to probably 75-85 over night.  What I don't know is what your gear can sustain for how long.  Depending on the materials it could be no impact for several years to skis premature delamination over one summer.

 

The things in your favor are you aren't using them while they are thermal cycling.  Way less stress on them.  My non scientific mind thinks your biggest issue is going to be epoxies and glues weakening.  I doubt any of the metals will care one way or another.  I think the priority of concern would be (remember I'm guessing and have no data):

  1. Glues and epoxies
  2. Structure
  3. Plastic
  4. Metal

 

By structure I'm referring to things like camber and how the different parts continue to interact.  The CTE for each material is going to be different so they will expand and contract slower and quicker.  This is what can break them down and you'll get things like delamination and possibly even a softer ski.  I'm really guessing at this point as I know these things occur,but I don't know at what temp for the materials you have or how long they can handle it.

 

I keep my gear in my basement and the coldest it ever gets is the low 40's and usually no hotter than 75.  My issue is dealing with the humidity so I run a dehumidifier all summer.

 

I would also think that for your garage to get to 140F and needs to be hotter than that outside or you would need some other source of heat generation; paint it black, run equipment that generates heat etc.  Put a couple cheap thermometers out there and check at the hottest part of the day.  I'm sure it's hot, but I remember living in Barstow CA and the temp drops when I went into the garage.  It was still hot, but not as hot as being in direct sunlight.  I wouldn't want to go in the attic though!

 

 

Or I could be completely wrong,

Ken

post #6 of 18
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the replies, I guess I knew the answer but just wanted to check. There are four of us and we all have a couple of sets of skis/snowboards, boots, poles, helmets, that's a lot of indoor storage space to find.

 

I hadn't considered the grease in the bindings breaking down, but I was worried about the wood cores warping and the boots cracking.

 

As far as the temperature in the garage being hotter than outside, which is close to 115 degrees right now, I think it is the metal garage door acting as a huge radiant heater, it gets too hot to even touch. It may be my imagination, but I'm pretty sure it's significantly hotter on the inside.

 

I just put up fancy new shelves in the garage for all our gear last winter as well!

 

BW.

post #7 of 18

Any insulation installed in the garage (including the door)?

post #8 of 18

First thing to do is see if there is an issue.  Put a cheap dollar store or home depot thermometer where everything is store and see what the temp is.  If the garage door is radiating heat, it will dissipate as you get further away.  Heat rises so you best chances for lower temps are down low.  I don't think you need to worry too much about the boots cracking if you aren't using them in there.  Cold is harder on plastics than heat (until you get close to melting).  I'd be worried about spiders getting in them than anything else.  Put the effort in storing the skis.  The north side of the garage should be the coolest.

post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post


Simmer in AZ you're going through the same temperature swing but at a higher temp; 140 to probably 75-85 over night.  What I don't know is what your gear can sustain for how long.  Depending on the materials it could be no impact for several years to skis premature delamination over one summer.

 

The things in your favor are you aren't using them while they are thermal cycling.  Way less stress on them.  My non scientific mind thinks your biggest issue is going to be epoxies and glues weakening.  I doubt any of the metals will care one way or another.  I think the priority of concern would be (remember I'm guessing and have no data):

  1. Glues and epoxies
  2. Structure
  3. Plastic
  4. Metal

 

Or I could be completely wrong,

Ken

I'm going to disagree in the metal hypothesis.  Think if it this way.  It is the metal that expands most when heated and contracts most when cooled right?  If you have a metal laminate or metal sandwich construction, under heat extremes that expands, and does so at greater rates and lengths than the other materials within the sandwich.  Edges might become more prone to separating as they've stretched beyond what the p-tex or fiberglass did under the same hot temps.

 

But then again. Folks cycle race skis in the hot box at 140f+ over and over so who knows.  Just sounds stressful to me..

post #10 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post

First thing to do is see if there is an issue.  Put a cheap dollar store or home depot thermometer where everything is store and see what the temp is.  If the garage door is radiating heat, it will dissipate as you get further away.  Heat rises so you best chances for lower temps are down low.  I don't think you need to worry too much about the boots cracking if you aren't using them in there.  Cold is harder on plastics than heat (until you get close to melting).  I'd be worried about spiders getting in them than anything else.  Put the effort in storing the skis.  The north side of the garage should be the coolest.

 

Scorpions are the main problem. We have to keep anything they could crawl into off the ground. That's why I built my fancy shelves. When my girls were little we used to put the legs of their cribs into glass bowls, as glass is one of the few things a scorpion can't climb up.

 

Most of the cookie cutter homes here are built without insulation in the garages to keep the building costs down. Even the walls and slab get hot to touch and whole place turns into an oven. I moved all the stuff inside just in case, expensive to replace.

post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

I'm going to disagree in the metal hypothesis.  Think if it this way.  It is the metal that expands most when heated and contracts most when cooled right?  If you have a metal laminate or metal sandwich construction, under heat extremes that expands, and does so at greater rates and lengths than the other materials within the sandwichEdges might become more prone to separating as they've stretched beyond what the p-tex or fiberglass did under the same hot temps.

 

But then again. Folks cycle race skis in the hot box at 140f+ over and over so who knows.  Just sounds stressful to me..

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post

I'm sure one of the scientist here can explain, but my limited knowledge of thermal cycling is you should avoid it (thermal cycling).  As a manufacturer, we do such things to weed out problems with our product; either workmanship issues or defective parts.  Everything sees some thermal cycling.  Most handle things well as long as you stay away from extremes.  Once you go from one extreme to another, you either need "beefy" things like cast iron or specialty products like Pyrex.  Think of what happens with the items we use to cook with.  One of the reasons boots take a beating is because while skiing, they'll go from our warm car, to the cold slope to the warm car, to the cold basement/garage etc. and that can be a temperature swing of 50 to 70 degrees.  Most plastics don't like that and will be stressed.  This stress will eventually cause cracks.  Better plastics last longer.  The activity level the plastics are seeing while thermal cycling will also affect how long they'll last.  Someone riding the tails of their skis isn't stressing their boots near as much as a racer or hard carver would.

 

Simmer in AZ you're going through the same temperature swing but at a higher temp; 140 to probably 75-85 over night.  What I don't know is what your gear can sustain for how long.  Depending on the materials it could be no impact for several years to skis premature delamination over one summer.

 

The things in your favor are you aren't using them while they are thermal cycling.  Way less stress on them.  My non scientific mind thinks your biggest issue is going to be epoxies and glues weakening.  I doubt any of the metals will care one way or another.  I think the priority of concern would be (remember I'm guessing and have no data):

  1. Glues and epoxies
  2. Structure
  3. Plastic
  4. Metal

 

By structure I'm referring to things like camber and how the different parts continue to interact.  The CTE for each material is going to be different so they will expand and contract slower and quicker.  This is what can break them down and you'll get things like delamination and possibly even a softer ski.  I'm really guessing at this point as I know these things occur,but I don't know at what temp for the materials you have or how long they can handle it.

 

I keep my gear in my basement and the coldest it ever gets is the low 40's and usually no hotter than 75.  My issue is dealing with the humidity so I run a dehumidifier all summer.

 

I would also think that for your garage to get to 140F and needs to be hotter than that outside or you would need some other source of heat generation; paint it black, run equipment that generates heat etc.  Put a couple cheap thermometers out there and check at the hottest part of the day.  I'm sure it's hot, but I remember living in Barstow CA and the temp drops when I went into the garage.  It was still hot, but not as hot as being in direct sunlight.  I wouldn't want to go in the attic though!

 

 

Or I could be completely wrong,

Ken

 

I think we're in agreement but our definitions are different.  My comment on metals was meant to mean that the metal won't break down.  I listed structure as second which I believe is your point.  Because the CTE (co-efficient of thermal expansion) of the metal is different from the Ptex, it could separate.  I considered that break down as structure.  The metal is still intact and its molecular structure didn't change (at least I don't think it did), but it separated from the Ptex.

 

I picked the Glues as number 1 because they are usually more susceptible to heat than plastics.  At work, we use heat to soften epoxies so we can remove components.  Once the glues let go and CTE kicks in, there isn't anything holding things together.  Because the metal is stronger than Ptex, the metal will rip from the Ptex.  But it was the glue, structure design and plastic (Ptex) that weakened.  The metal remained strong.

 

I think the real answer is to sell your gear in the Spring and buy new in the Fall biggrin.gif

post #12 of 18
Do you have a roof box for your car? Or find a sealable box big enough. I'd bet that if you put your stuff in there with some towels or blankets to insulate it, then you'd be fine.
post #13 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dino View Post

Do you have a roof box for your car? Or find a sealable box big enough. I'd bet that if you put your stuff in there with some towels or blankets to insulate it, then you'd be fine.

 

No roof box. The wife wasn't too happy sacrificing some shoe space in the bedroom closet, but all the gear is inside now. I'll move it back out to the garage when the temperature drops, usually by October. Bring on the snow!

post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bad Wolf View Post

 

No roof box. The wife wasn't too happy sacrificing some shoe space in the bedroom closet, but all the gear is inside now. I'll move it back out to the garage when the temperature drops, usually by October. Bring on the snow!

 

Ya know.  The shoes can handle thermal cycling much better than skis and will do much better in the garage.  Have fun convincing her of that! roflmao.gif

post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post

 

Ya know.  The shoes can handle thermal cycling much better than skis and will do much better in the garage.  Have fun convincing her of that! roflmao.gif

 

popcorn.gif let us know how that works......

post #16 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post

 

Ya know.  The shoes can handle thermal cycling much better than skis and will do much better in the garage.  Have fun convincing her of that! roflmao.gif

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ScotsSkier View Post

 

popcorn.gif let us know how that works......

 

It's already cost me a trip to the Labor Day sales....

post #17 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bad Wolf View Post
It's already cost me a trip to the Labor Day sales....

 

Brother I feel your pain.  My wife (non skier) believes our house can only stay in balance if for every ski purchase I make, she has an equal Coach purchase.  The money those folks charge you would think the purses came with money in them!  Fortunately I have enough skis now and have traded a few in and out, that she can't keep track.  I also tune skis for my friends.  Now when she questions me I tell her "Those are Buddy's" or "I've had those for almost three years!  In fact, I'm thinking about selling them and getting something different."

post #18 of 18

The only way to be sure your skis are OK during summer is to take them out and play with them every day.

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