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I wonder if I have forgotten everything!

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

It is that time of year when I begin to ponder skiing again.  After being totally immersed in Summer activities, I wonder if I remember how!?  This has occurred to me every year since my first year of skiing in 1975.  Of course it all comes back as soon as my feet touch the snow, but that doubt always exists in a tiny corner of my mind.

 

Does this happen to anyone else? or am I nuts?....

post #2 of 18

You are nuts. 

 

 

However I did not require anything you wrote above to make that assessment.  biggrin.gif

 

 

 

PS: How did the boat turn out?

post #3 of 18
I'm the opposite. I never stop thinking about skiing and when my skis touch the snow the first time of the season, I'm reminded that I still have a lot to learn and don't ski near as well as my "pondering" does!
post #4 of 18
Thread Starter 

Thanks Skidude for helping me confirm that.

 

The boat has been awesome and absolutely loving sailing!  Plan to keep it on Tahoe next year and join in some beer can racing!  If I don't forget  how to sail over the Winter!rolleyes.gif  Glad I chose the boat I did.  Of course I am dreaming about the next one.....

post #5 of 18

I'm with you Bud, and I will add that I like to live my summer in willful ignorance of skiing so that it can all feel fresh and awesome when I go back to it. Usually, my thoughts on my first run are "Wow, I can't believe how fast we go".

post #6 of 18
I'm kind of like L&AC in that I think about skiing ALWAYS.

I'm way less certain this season, however, about how my return to snow will go because I haven't skied since being run down last December and requiring surgery to stabilize the fractured tibia plateau. Walking downhill on uneven terrain--and even going down stairways--continue to be somewhat less than "natural" with the weak leg, so I'm a bit anxious about releasing that ski and going downhill with it.
post #7 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post

I'm kind of like L&AC in that I think about skiing ALWAYS.
I'm way less certain this season, however, about how my return to snow will go because I haven't skied since being run down last December and requiring surgery to stabilize the fractured tibia plateau. Walking downhill on uneven terrain--and even going down stairways--continue to be somewhat less than "natural" with the weak leg, so I'm a bit anxious about releasing that ski and going downhill with it.

 

Kneale,

Not for the same reason but I've gone through that twice (ACL's).  First turn was the hardest.  Once I got through the mental block, all was good.

 

Me knee still reminds to this day of my injuries walking down slopes.  The good news is that your body position walking down stairs is harder on your knees than a good skiing position, even in steeps.

 

Ken

post #8 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by bud heishman View Post

or am I nuts?....

That is wayyyy too easy.

 

If I can take clinics before my mountain opens, I can get the season warm up in. You've seen my skiing when the warm up isn't complete. This is not something I worry about. It's a process that has to be done. It's not that I don't remember how. It's just that performance is a little too sloppy for doing demonstrations. On opening day for my home resort I usually either get a group of new instructors to lead for ITC or do back to back clinics to warm up the returning pros. So the pressure to perform is on. But I also have a routine before opening day. Fitness tune up runs from labor day to thanksgiving. Marketing rep duties in Sept and Oct mean 4 days spent talking to the public about skiing. Trainer meetings, returning instructor meetings and indoor ITC sessions mean additional "skiing days" (just not on snow) before the season starts. I remember many years ago when I stopped getting that weird "my feet are 5 feet long"  sensation on day 1. Now it's just click into the bindings and go. The Aussies say it best - "No worries, mate!"

post #9 of 18

Age has its' benefits.  I keep forgetting to worry about not being able to ski, it is always a surprise when I can't.

 

Bud really understand your concerns about coming back from an injury.  It is the first real good crash I worry about in that scenario.  Your good, it will be fine.

post #10 of 18

I don't worry so much that I have forgotten everything, I worry more about my unconscious remembering ingrained bad habits or useless, unnecessary, ineffective movements that are leftover from a time gone by eek.gif.

 

This is what I posted in a recent, similar thread:

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/113204/how-to-keep-in-the-groove#post_1480054

 

Quote:

Mental practice...  Imagine, visualize & feel the movements. 

 

Focus on stance & balance.

 

Dynamics...  Be precise, dynamic & accurate in all of your daily activities.  From walking on the stairs to driving the car, make it all about skiing.

 

& as has been said, read about it.  Watch lots of ski porn, ski races, & instructional stuff.  I often tell my students "1st you have to read about it, 2nd you need to see it, 3rd you get to try it & lastly you  will feel it.  Once you "feel it", you will then begin to understand it.

 

Technique wise, I often think my first turns of the season are usually some of my best!  I tend to stay on easy groomers (usually that is all that is open, so it is pretty easy to stay disciplined) & focus on the absolute basics, with an emphasis on whatever I was trying to refine during the previous season. 

 

If the first day is a powder day, that all goes out the window of course!

 

Think snow,

ski.gif

JF

post #11 of 18

A few years ago, we had a late start to the winter. I had to teach a 3-day race clinic starting on the first day of operations. I got up there early and took one run before meeting my group. I was like "Well at least I'm one run ahead of you guys". Turns out I still knew how to ski.

post #12 of 18
Thread Starter 

Agree with you Jim!  I find myself visualizing alot and ingraining intents and movements I want to focus on this season.  I find the clearer and more concisely my mind is connected to my body, the better I ski the first day.  

post #13 of 18

I rarely ski. I don't need the constant reassurance. I know I will perform at or near my best every time I ski.  My skill level has not changed in a long time and I don't expect it will for a long time to come.

post #14 of 18

I kind of get this too.  It all feels a little foreign after several months off until you take your first turn, then it's like riding a bike.  Same deal if I haven't hit a golf ball in a while.

post #15 of 18

I learned to ski as an adult, and for many years I had forgotten how to ski over the summer.  Every year the first day was an exercise in frustration, and the fear that it would never come back.

 

I remember clearly the joy I felt the first year that things just worked during the first run of the season.

post #16 of 18
Thread Starter 

Golf, an interesting parallel.. ..  This should be a whole new thread and I am sure somewhere on Epicski it is.

post #17 of 18

I am heading to the water ramps at Lake Placid next week. It has been over 30 years since I was on a ramp or inverted on skis. We will see how long muscle memory is retained.

post #18 of 18

I am always thinking about skiing too, sometimes I think I'm crazy, I'll be on a beach and I'll be visualising cranking a slalom turn or a backflip. I only ever stop skiing for a few months in spring and autumn, but the first week or so always feels a bit off. I have found it depends a lot on what the snow is like and how much of the mountain is open, if I can get a lot of laps in on softish snow I'll be good in a few days, but a few seasons back all we had was an icy beginner slope, and it took me ages to feel right again.

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