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How to keep in the groove?

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 

I was wondering how all of you skiers out there stay in the sking groove so that you dont feel akward and shaky when you get back on the mountain next season.

post #2 of 20

I can remember that being a problem a few decades ago.  It's not a problem for me any more.

 

As near as I can recall, the best approach was just to accept it. 

 

I also believe that doing things that exercise your balance and timing during the off season, like biking, martial arts, canoeing, walking on railings, logs over creeks, etc. (yes I'm worst than the kids), etc. will help. 

post #3 of 20

Think the first day out feels a little odd to everybody, World Cup racers included.  But an off day to a WC racer is the dream of most any recreational skiers.  Ghost is right the more years you ski the less off you are, but you will recognize it more.

 

Oh ya, fell off a log into Puget Sound at high tide this morning, it was wet and cold. The dog laughed.

post #4 of 20

^^^Good answers

 

The more years I ski the less concern I have with getting back on snow in the beginning of the season. 

 

In years past, I used to wonder if I forgot how to ski over the summer.  Not so much any more. 

 

Experience and passion tend to overcome nerves. 

post #5 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriso10299 View Post

I was wondering how all of you skiers out there stay in the sking groove so that you dont feel akward and shaky when you get back on the mountain next season.

 

 

I generally go sailing and don't worry about it. Or I think about how weird alpine skiing seems compared to telemark. Then I think about how weird telemark seems compared to alpine. Then I play around with my 2 year old and think how fun it's going to be teaching him to ski, then getting skied in the ground by him when he's 16. Then I have a beer. Then I read some posts about which brand is best. Then I brush my teeth. Then I go to bed. Repeat with much variation the next day and over and over until it snows and we go skiing again. Oh yeah, I might put a new sticker on my skis this week. If I were young and single, or just single, I'd think about going on some dates as well. smile.gif


Edited by markojp - 8/22/12 at 9:40am
post #6 of 20

Here's another thought - 

Do you think that the more ski days you get in a year helps to not get head games for the following season? 

 

After my 80+ day season last year, I really am eager to get out on the slopes and don't have a concern about being shaky

Think Snow! . snowfalling.gif

post #7 of 20

Read ski forums all spring/summer/fall.

post #8 of 20

Won't there be some hype about the newest Warren Miller type flick out?  I'm thinking we usually get that stoke around late September/early October.

 

Skateboarding, surfing, and especially biking is good cross training to keep the ski legs sharp.

post #9 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

Won't there be some hype about the newest Warren Miller type flick out?  I'm thinking we usually get that stoke around late September/early October.

 

Skateboarding, surfing, and especially biking is good cross training to keep the ski legs sharp.

Where've you been?

Ski Porn Stoke 2012-13

post #10 of 20

Never really had a problem with getting back into things, weekly practice probably helps, I think I feel more odd when I change skis than when I haven't skied in a while and get going again.



Lukas

post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lukas View Post

Never really had a problem with getting back into things, weekly practice probably helps, I think I feel more odd when I change skis than when I haven't skied in a while and get going again.



Lukas

Skis don't tend to have an impact on my mojo, but breaking in new boots can have an impact. 


Edited by Trekchick - 8/22/12 at 12:09pm
post #12 of 20

Well, I'm only on my third pair of boots, each pair has just felt better than the last. Though I suppose as I've never stood on anything wider than 95mm, something like a 130 would probably unsettle me for a short amount of time.



Lukas

post #13 of 20
Thread Starter 
[read ski forums all spring/fall]

Exactly:D
post #14 of 20

I have yet to find anything that keeps me spot on in the groove over the off season. My first run in the fall is never going to be as solid as my last run in the spring. One thing that really helps me knock the rust off very quickly is that within the first week or so of getting back on snow, I'm typically taking 2-4 days of refresher training and clinicing with some pretty heavy hitting PSIA dudes (and chicks). Having someone give you MA and drills to do really snaps you back into the groove, and prevents those little bad habits at the start of the season from becoming ingrained. For the average recreational skier... or the fantastically advanced recreational skier, really... the best thing I can think of is to take a lesson almost right off the bat. Day one, take to yourself, and take it easy. I never ski more than a blue on my first day, and tend to avoid bumps or anything heavy... unless its November 2011 at Stowe, then bumps was all we had. In any case, day one is an easy cruise day, then day two hit up a lesson for an hour or two. That'll help get you back into your swing faster than anything I can think of.

 

Of course, this is coupled with an off season exercise regimen. Bike, swim, run, work out at the gym, kayak, chase college kids through the woods with a hockey mask and a machete... whatever works best for you to keep your muscles working and your heart pumping.

post #15 of 20

Mental practice...  Imagine, visualize & feel the movements. 

 

Focus on stance & balance.

 

Dynamics...  Be precise, dynamic & accurate in all of your daily activities.  From walking on the stairs to driving the car, make it all about skiing.

 

& as has been said, read about it.  Watch lots of ski porn, ski races, & instructional stuff.  I often tell my students "1st you have to read about it, 2nd you need to see it, 3rd you get to try it & lastly you  will feel it.  Once you "feel it", you will then begin to understand it.

 

Technique wise, I often think my first turns of the season are usually some of my best!  I tend to stay on easy groomers (usually that is all that is open, so it is pretty easy to stay disciplined) & focus on the absolute basics with an emphasis on whatever I was trying to refine during the previous season. 

If the first day is a powder day, that all goes out the window of course!

 

Think snow,

ski.gif

JF

post #16 of 20
Luckily......ski.
post #17 of 20

I usually plan on taking it easy, but most of the time I get way to excited on the first lift or standing in the opening day line-up and end up trying to be the first one to hit my favorate lines or features. Last year every run on the mountain was open on opening day and there were fresh lines to be had for the entire opening weekend. Thats unusual but my fingers are crossed. I cant wait to pick snow out of my gogles with a huge smile on my face again. Going down stairs always hurts for a week, and it will again this year. I just accept it and get excited.

post #18 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriso10299 View Post

I was wondering how all of you skiers out there stay in the sking groove so that you dont feel akward and shaky when you get back on the mountain next season.

 

This problem usually takes care of it's self. Rarely does the whole mountain open at once around here,  normally it starts with the easier slopes ie; the ones that have snow making and goes from there. So by the time the whole mountain is open I have 10-20 days on the snow and not skiing serious lines right out of gate. Last year being the exception to this, was way above those numbers before anything serious opened. It has happened that it dumped snow in October, November and everything went around Turkey Day, but not for like 8 or 9 years now. 

 

That being said I do notice a lay off of 7 days during the middle of the season, it effects timing, balance and confidence, this can't be helped and a few runs fix it. 

post #19 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

Skis don't tend to have an impact on my mojo, but breaking in new boots can have an impact. 

 

Amen, sister. 

post #20 of 20

Indoor ski slopes.

 

I try to get a friend of mine to go with me once a month throughout the summer and autumn, but inevitably we always miss July and August. I'll start going again in a couple of weeks.

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