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Review Patagonia Down Shirt

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

I got the Patagonia Down shirt for skiing last winter. I have used it for a year season and have these thoughts. 

 

For skiing, the down shirt is a great layering piece when temps are below about 20F and can work as a shell in fair weather. Functionally the shirt is about a halfinch thick down layer with a half zip and minimal embellishments. It is light and pack-able at the expense of features. The shirt replaces and improves on the ubiquitous fleece layer in a few key respects:

 

The Good:

1. It moves very well and feels light. Fleece seems to stick to my baselayer and binds up a bit when I am moving. The down shirt slides smoothly over other layers. 

2. Its warmth some how feels "just right". I never feel sweaty or too warm in this thing. Perhaps when I do sweat a little it wets the down and then reduces insulation and cools me off. Which is EXACTLY what sweating is supposed to do. Either way it feels very comfortable.

3. It is windproof and DWR coated which allows it to function very nicely as an outer layer and also improves it's insulation properties. 

4. Packability is super and this layer can comes with me on any trip where I have a pack with me. I keep this in my pack on every ski tour to throw on when I stop to keep from getting cold. 

5. Even on powder days, I stay warm and dry with this under my shell. 

 

The Bad: 

1. The down will compress underneath me while sitting on the lift, so my back will get cold on some lifts. 

2. Only a half zip and no pockets, makes it less useful as an outer layer.

3. Not really ideal for sitting around the camp fire as ashes will quickly burn holes in this light weight jacket. 

 

Bottom line: I would not be with out a thin light pack-able down layer for skiing in the intermountain region. 


Edited by tromano - 8/18/12 at 8:32am
post #2 of 17

Nice review.  Couple questions: Fit - boxy/trim, sleeve and waist length?  And packed size: when it's packed is it tiny like a ping-pong ball, or huge like watermelon, (or a telemarker's ego)?  

post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Lee View Post

Nice review.  Couple questions: Fit - boxy/trim, sleeve and waist length?  And packed size: when it's packed is it tiny like a ping-pong ball, or huge like watermelon, (or a telemarker's ego)?  

 

I have a Size L in the down shirt and I wear L in all outer wear. The fit is about in the middle, not really athletic or boxy. Sleeve length is about 35" on the L and the waist is jus tlong enough that if I lift my arms its not flying up over my waist. 

 


Packed up, it is about the size of an apple or orange. 


Edited by tromano - 8/18/12 at 8:19pm
post #4 of 17
Thanks!
post #5 of 17

I find the down shirt to be tight in the shoulders.

 

The ultralight down jacket would be of similar warmth with a full zip, perhaps a little warmer but still a lightweight mid layer.

 

Having said all that, I like the nano better as a mid layer.  If I work up a sweat I'm not as adverse to the nano getting wet.  That would also translate into using it as an outer layer.  I've also skinned with it as an outer layer on dawn patrol days.

 

The temp range we're talking about also works well in the nano's favor.  The UL's are good as mid layers and the jacket is a nice, quick throw-on when touring and summiting.  But they are all good summer weight's for alpine backpacking.  Since you can run into more moist water rather than snow in those climes, I lean towards the primoloft nano.

 

The nano is a little less expensive as well.  All are great.  I have 'em all.  I get a bit of deal with the Patagonia.

post #6 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by splitter View Post

I find the down shirt to be tight in the shoulders.

 

The ultralight down jacket would be of similar warmth with a full zip, perhaps a little warmer but still a lightweight mid layer.

 

Having said all that, I like the nano better as a mid layer.  If I work up a sweat I'm not as adverse to the nano getting wet.  That would also translate into using it as an outer layer.  I've also skinned with it as an outer layer on dawn patrol days.

 

The temp range we're talking about also works well in the nano's favor.  The UL's are good as mid layers and the jacket is a nice, quick throw-on when touring and summiting.  But they are all good summer weight's for alpine backpacking.  Since you can run into more moist water rather than snow in those climes, I lean towards the primoloft nano.

 

The nano is a little less expensive as well.  All are great.  I have 'em all.  I get a bit of deal with the Patagonia.

 

I ski UT and In my experience sweating through my down is not a real problem either for resort, day torus or a mix.  The whole point of layering and technical clothing is to adjust as conditions change so you keep comfortable and efficient all day long. I often will start with an insulation layer, then throw it in the pack after skiing for 20 minutes, then put it back on at the top. If I am sweating so much to we my insulation, then the bigger problem is over heated and getting dehydrated. To me the fact that down loses some insulation when wet is kind of a good thing. 


Edited by tromano - 8/19/12 at 8:02pm
post #7 of 17

I'm know how layers work.  I manage the Patagonia store.  So I'm also very familiar with the products.

 

I can appreciate how removing or adding a layer is the benefit of using the system.  However, stopping a lot and changing clothes isn't ideal either.

 

I'm not disagreeing with you.  Merely giving my input on the fact that if there is a little sweat, I think less of that affecting my primoloft insulation piece compared with my down.  Ultimately I stop and change clothes less.

 

I also was only adding that the nano is a very viable substitute that doubles its duty (including summer or more wet precip seasons) based on the fact that in can get wet.  And costs less.  

 

I have a down shirt.  I have an UL down jacket.  I have more down sweaters than you can shake a stick at.  I have more nanos than should be considered reasonable.

 

I use the nano and the UL down jacket the most.

 

I was only adding to your review with what I would consider to be reasonable insight.

 

Of course, this is your review and maybe the protocol is that I don't interfere.  For that, I apologize.

post #8 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by splitter View Post

I'm know how layers work.  I manage the Patagonia store.  So I'm also very familiar with the products.

 

I can appreciate how removing or adding a layer is the benefit of using the system.  However, stopping a lot and changing clothes isn't ideal either.

 

I'm not disagreeing with you.  Merely giving my input on the fact that if there is a little sweat, I think less of that affecting my primoloft insulation piece compared with my down.  Ultimately I stop and change clothes less.

 

I also was only adding that the nano is a very viable substitute that doubles its duty (including summer or more wet precip seasons) based on the fact that in can get wet.  And costs less.  

 

I have a down shirt.  I have an UL down jacket.  I have more down sweaters than you can shake a stick at.  I have more nanos than should be considered reasonable.

 

I use the nano and the UL down jacket the most.

 

I was only adding to your review with what I would consider to be reasonable insight.

 

Of course, this is your review and maybe the protocol is that I don't interfere.  For that, I apologize.

 

Cool. Your store sells great stuff. 

 

The shirt is in my pack all  winter (unless its on my back). I looked at the UL jackt for a long time before going wiht the shirt. I chose having something small that can live in my pack all season over the improved versatility of the UL jacket. Maybe I will try out the nano some time. I just picked up an R3 the other week. 

 

How big is the nano when packed up? About the same size as a down sweater? 

post #9 of 17

Is this the shirt you're talking about? 

2013 Patagonia Men's Ultralight Down Shirt

post #10 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by splitter View Post

I'm know how layers work.  I manage the Patagonia store.  So I'm also very familiar with the products.

 

I can appreciate how removing or adding a layer is the benefit of using the system.  However, stopping a lot and changing clothes isn't ideal either.

 

I'm not disagreeing with you.  Merely giving my input on the fact that if there is a little sweat, I think less of that affecting my primoloft insulation piece compared with my down.  Ultimately I stop and change clothes less.

 

I also was only adding that the nano is a very viable substitute that doubles its duty (including summer or more wet precip seasons) based on the fact that in can get wet.  And costs less.  

 

I have a down shirt.  I have an UL down jacket.  I have more down sweaters than you can shake a stick at.  I have more nanos than should be considered reasonable.

 

I use the nano and the UL down jacket the most.

 

I was only adding to your review with what I would consider to be reasonable insight.

 

Of course, this is your review and maybe the protocol is that I don't interfere.  For that, I apologize.

No apologies necessary, unless you want to apologize for the depletion of my bank account because I live too close to your work place. biggrin.gif

post #11 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

Is this the shirt you're talking about? 

2013 Patagonia Men's Ultralight Down Shirt

Uh huh.

post #12 of 17

I have the ultralight down sweater from last season. Thought hard about the shirt, but wanted touch more insulation. Sweater works nicely as a middle layer for lift-served, about same wamth as a typical heavy-weight fleece, but far lighter, breathes better, packs into nothing, doesn't get manky as fast.

 

But for hiking or skinning in typical conditions, say 15-25 degrees, would go for the Nano for reasons Splitter gives. I ski cold, but sweat like (barnyard stock of your choice) when I'm going uphill. So actually for that I wear a Nano vest, my shell ends up in the pack until I stop. 

 

Agree with Tromano about summer duty. Great pack and cooking gear, for sure. But cothes must already be goners to qualify. 


Edited by beyond - 8/20/12 at 11:14am
post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

Uh huh.

Thanks for putting the review up on the product page too. 

 

I happen to be working on the patagonia product pages for 2013 now.  They have some really nice new stuff coming out. 

 

I'll tag them here in the next few days as I get them up. 

beercheer.gif

post #14 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

I have the ultralight down sweater from last season. Thought hard about the shirt, but wanted touch more insulation. Sweater works nicely as a middle layer for lift-served, about same wamth as a typical heavy-weight fleece, but far lighter, breathes better, packs into nothing, doesn't get manky as fast.

 

But for hiking or skinning in typical conditions, say 15-25 degrees, would go for the Nano for reasons Splitter gives. I ski cold, but sweat like (barnyard stock of your choice) when I'm going uphill. So actually for that I wear a Nano vest, my shell ends up in the pack until I stop. 

 

Agree with Tromano about summer duty. Great pack and cooking gear, for sure. But cothes must already be goners to qualify. 

 

Me too, thats why i go to a t-shirt / baselayer most times when skiining. 

post #15 of 17
Thread Starter 

I ended up getting the nano hoody at an After XMAS sale. I like it better than the shirt for "all mountain" use,  and I see why splitter speaks so highly of it. It is slightly warmer than the shirt and  think it replaces a hard shell and other insulation layer in my pack for most fair weather days in the mountains,and day tours. 

 

I tried skinning in it today (it was single digits and breezy) and like the shirt, for me, it is simply too warm for the skin track. After skinning in it for about 30 minutes, it stinks and needs to be washed. wink.gif

post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

I ended up getting the nano hoody at an After XMAS sale. I like it better than the shirt for "all mountain" use,  and I see why splitter speaks so highly of it. It is slightly warmer than the shirt and  think it replaces a hard shell and other insulation layer in my pack for most fair weather days in the mountains,and day tours. 

I tried skinning in it today (it was single digits and breezy) and like the shirt, for me, it is simply too warm for the skin track. After skinning in it for about 30 minutes, it stinks and needs to be washed. wink.gif

Nice...do you have a link for the nano?
post #17 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by swisstrader View Post


Nice...do you have a link for the nano?

 

I bought it at Al's B&M store in Logan. http://www.alssports.com/Product.aspx?pf_id=PAAAAAFGNFNICMIL

 

The link shows regular price. But they were 50% off in the after Xmas sale which ends today. Probably still get that price if you order over the phone. 

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