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Boot backpack that "plays small"

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

Time for some late summer shopping:

 

I'm tired of rubbing the skin off my neck from walking around with ski boots dangling off to both sides - but I don't want to spent the day lugging a mammoth, racing-gear bag either. 

 

I've look at the Transpack sidekick models - they'd definitely do the job. Though I'm a bit worried about my boots accumulating when I walk in a storm. They're also pretty expensive ...

 

Any other recommendations?

 

Or how about just strapping boots to the outside of a regular backpack or camelbag?

post #2 of 17

Once you go HOT, you'll never go back!

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/111914/hot-gear-ajax-heated-boot-bag

 

 

I'd check STP ASAP?

post #3 of 17
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the tip!

 

That pack looks a little bulky to ski with, though. STP's Dakine Boot Pack actually seem to go more in the direction I'm thinking.

 

(I am a big believer in warming boots, though! We use blowers.)

post #4 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikesusangray View Post

Thanks for the tip!

 

That pack looks a little bulky to ski with, though. STP's Dakine Boot Pack actually seem to go more in the direction I'm thinking.

 

(I am a big believer in warming boots, though! We use blowers.)

It`s hard to imagine you are gonna find a good fit backpack that you are gonna be able to carry your boots and also ski with the pack, I love my Ajax bag, but you definitely cannot ski with the pack in your back, you would have to store the pack in the lodge.

 

Maybe someone have some idea on how to carry your boots in a more comfortable way from the parking lot to the snow. The dakine although more compact is also big enough to mess affect your balance while skiing. I`m would say that there is no such pack for what you are looking for. Even though some of the bags might not be so big as some backcountry packs, they are not designed as ski backpacks.

 

Where do you store the shoes you are using during the walk? You can keep the bag with your shoes... maybe that`s an idea.

post #5 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikesusangray View Post

I've look at the Transpack sidekick models - they'd definitely do the job. Though I'm a bit worried about my boots accumulating when I walk in a storm. They're also pretty expensive ...

 

Found a Transpack Sidekick on sale several years ago and have been very happy with it.  I mainly use it when I travel.  I always travel with my laptop.  I got what is now called the Sidekick Lite that does not have covers for the boots.  I just bring along plastic bags to put over the tops if I'm not booting up in the car.  Hasn't been a big problem.  The more expensive Sidekick Pro has covers for the boots.

 

When I fly, I take the boots out before I board.  Then it's easy for me to put the boots and the helmet up (I'm a petite woman) and keep the backpack on the floor.  I like having stuff easily available, especially for a longer flight.  There are zippers to keep the backpack trim when there isn't a helmet in it.

post #6 of 17

I have an earlier version of this one and have skied with it (although not in resort), and it was fine. It's fairly narrow, and has a really nice hip belt. Lange Pro Boot Bag, I think.

 

 1000

post #7 of 17
Put your socks or gloves into the top of the boots on those external boot mount bags and you don't have to worry about the boots filling up with snow.
post #8 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post

Put your socks or gloves into the top of the boots on those external boot mount bags and you don't have to worry about the boots filling up with snow.

Yes, or I always have a couple of spare beanies in my bag, which also work. (Best to buckle them on, though.)

post #9 of 17
Thread Starter 

Hi guys!

 

A bit of background here: I walk about 1.5 miles every time time I go skiing, which tends to be around 30 days per year. In particular, my mother-in-law lives outside of Interlaken, involving a longish walk to and from the train station. Also, I like to have a bag along anyway to carry street shoes, sandwiches, thermos, book and whatever else the family needs for a day out (wife and two teenagers).

 

I think those bags with "stirrups"/external carriers make the most sense. I've seen four possibilities so far: There are two Transack models (pro and lite), a Rossignol (http://www.snowshack.com/detail/SNW+R-50313_Rossignol+Bootie+Transport+Pack+25L) and the Lange bag (picture above).

 

Do you guys have any feedback on those four - or any further recommendations?

 

- In the pictures, the Transack bags look kind of clumsy - but I'm judging a book by its cover ... Of the two, I think that only the pro has chest and hip stabilizers - something I definitely want. 

 

- I like the looks of that Lange bag - can anyone tell me where to find one on sale?? 

 

- The Rossi bag looks pretty nice too - but I can't tell about stabilizers.

post #10 of 17
Can't you just toss the boots over the top of the pack instead of your shoulders/neck? This way you can get the pack you want for what you have to carry while skiing.

Last season I used a regular backpack to get my gear to the lodge from the parking lot. Made carrying it very comfortable. I have a strap to connect the boots together and the boots hang over the top of the pack. Works great.

For keeping them dry and warm, I throw a hand warmer in the toe of the boot, ski sock on top of that, and seal it with a water bottle in the boot cuff. When I get to the lodge I have warm socks and boots and the hand warmer goes in my mittens.

Just a thought,

Ken
post #11 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikesusangray View Post

Hi guys!

 

A bit of background here: I walk about 1.5 miles every time time I go skiing, which tends to be around 30 days per year. In particular, my mother-in-law lives outside of Interlaken, involving a longish walk to and from the train station. Also, I like to have a bag along anyway to carry street shoes, sandwiches, thermos, book and whatever else the family needs for a day out (wife and two teenagers).

 

I think those bags with "stirrups"/external carriers make the most sense. I've seen four possibilities so far: There are two Transack models (pro and lite), a Rossignol (http://www.snowshack.com/detail/SNW+R-50313_Rossignol+Bootie+Transport+Pack+25L) and the Lange bag (picture above).

 

Do you guys have any feedback on those four - or any further recommendations?

 

- In the pictures, the Transack bags look kind of clumsy - but I'm judging a book by its cover ... Of the two, I think that only the pro has chest and hip stabilizers - something I definitely want. 

I agree you want the chest and hip stabilizers.  My old Sidekick has both.  Looks like it evolved into the Transpack Pro.  I can carry it comfortably fully loaded with boots, helmet, goggles, laptop, iPad, other small electronics and chargers, a set of ski clothes for a day (in case my checked luggage is delayed).  Seems like one time it weighed in around 30 pounds.  Note that I'm only 115 pounds, 5'0".  But that means my boots are relatively small.  It does make me much wider than usual, so need to be careful when going through doorways or walking near other people.

post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by L&AirC View Post

Can't you just toss the boots over the top of the pack instead of your shoulders/neck? This way you can get the pack you want for what you have to carry while skiing.
Last season I used a regular backpack to get my gear to the lodge from the parking lot. Made carrying it very comfortable. I have a strap to connect the boots together and the boots hang over the top of the pack. Works great.
Ken

 

You have a point there ... But doesn't the solution to life's problems always involve buying something?

 

More seriously, though: Since I need a backpack anyway, I might as well get one that will be a good fit for skiing. 

post #13 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikesusangray View Post

 

You have a point there ... But doesn't the solution to life's problems always involve buying something?

 

More seriously, though: Since I need a backpack anyway, I might as well get one that will be a good fit for skiing. 

 

That seems a great idea, since you have lots of stuff to carry, you can get a ski specific pack (like the Osprey Kode) and carry your boots attached to the straps. Do you also carry skis? A pack with A-frame straps would make it easy to put your boots around the skis, not sure if the edges won`t be a problem though. Of course it won`t be too comfortable compared to having a boot specific pack, but most important is how comfortable you stay while skiing and that`s where a good fit skiing pack is gonna help with little sacrifice during the walk.

post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikesusangray View Post

 

More seriously, though: Since I need a backpack anyway, I might as well get one that will be a good fit for skiing. 

Agreed.  I would focus the pursuit of a bag on what else you can use it for.  This brings many more bags into consideration if you know you can hang the boots on the top.  You might also be able to go smaller if you going to be skiing with it too since the boots will be outside.  I have a nice Osprey that I started using last year.  worked pretty good.  Was able to carry the backpack, boots, skis & poles with no issues.  THe pack was full of all sorts of stuff; helmet, food, water, coffee, race gear, and back up stuff.  I nice pack makes carrying a lot of gear a breeze.

 

If you look at camping gear, you might find something better and more reasonably priced.  Ospreys are a bit pricey but they are very well made.

post #15 of 17

I saw you with this at the Gathering and have been meaning to ask you which bag it was.  Thanks for posting!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by segbrown View Post

I have an earlier version of this one and have skied with it (although not in resort), and it was fine. It's fairly narrow, and has a really nice hip belt. Lange Pro Boot Bag, I think.

 

 1000

post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikesusangray View Post

- I like the looks of that Lange bag - can anyone tell me where to find one on sale?? 

 

- The Rossi bag looks pretty nice too - but I can't tell about stabilizers.

 

I think the Rossi and Lange bags are the same. They have diagonal ski carriers, too. I used mine to hike last summer, with skis and boots attached. Very comfortable. 

 

I would try strapping the boots and using them on a backpack, the times I've done that I didn't lash the boots to the pack and they swung around annoyingly. THat's the nice part about the "holsters" for the boots. But I'm sure you could rig up something to tie the boots down.

post #17 of 17
Thread Starter 

Hi guys!

 

Thanks for some great thoughts. Couple things:

 

- For most of my time skiing, I don't actually carry the backpack. I toss it next to a lift, come back to get it at lunch time, then pick it up again for the last run of the day (=all the way down to the station in the valley usually). Actually, one of those big ol' racer bags would probably be great - but it would be a shame to spoil the longest run of the day lummucking it ...

 

- I don't often have to carry skis. When we ski in the Grindelwald/Wengen area we leave our skis in a shack next to the train station but carry our boots home to air out over night. So that's not a huge factor.

 

- ALTHOUGH: I do make a few day trips per year from my own house in Zürich. When I do, I actually ride my bike to a ferry to cross the lake, then catch a train on the other side. Do you guys have any experience cycling with the skis in the straps and/or boarding trains with them?? 

 

BTW, I've noticed that the Rossi bag is available in Germany, which is much easier than having something sent from the US. I think I'll go for it. 

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