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Best skis for drilling / improving?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Hi All,

 

I would consider myself an intermediate to advanced skier. I’m 25 years old, and up until this point have only skied about one week a year on vacations. I would guess I have less than 100 days total on mountain in my life. I am planning to move to Colorado this year and could potentially ski 50 days or more this season. I would really like to improve my skiing ability. I have found Rick Schnellmann’s DVDs through this site (yourskicoach.com) and they seem perfect for what I am trying to do.

 

My question is what ski would work best with this type of training in mind? I would be doing a lot of balance drills, turn drills, and the like mostly on groomed runs. I have always rented skis and never paid too much attention to what they give me; but have now been reading up on skis quite a bit.  It seems like the current trend for an all-mountain ski is 80mm-90mm with some sort of rocker. I’m not sure that is what I need. For one, I would eventually buy powder skis, so I really don’t need a “one quiver” ski. Two, it seems like something thinner would be better to train with. Possibly 70mm-80mm with full camber or minimal tip rocker? Not really sure about length or turn radius. It seems something in this range would allow better control? I am not looking for an "easy" ski but something that will make to most out of these drills; allowing me to really learn edging and turn control, even on steeps. My ultimate goal is to be a true all mountain skier: moguls, trees, chutes, steeps, powder. I am 5’9”, 165lbs. Thank you all for your help!

post #2 of 11

If I were you I'd try to pick up a cheap pair of slalom race skis in 160 or 165. Old is fine. You can get a lot out of skiing a slalom ski not only because they are usually super stable and have awesome edge grip but the short turning radius allows you to take a ton of turns. Over time you can learn to really power the ski through your turns and use your body better.

 

Maybe I'm biased because that's how I learned to ski, but its a pretty cheap solution to your problem.

 

It definitely wouldnt be great in moguls trees or pow but on the groomers its the perfect drill ski. A shorter gs cut ski would be fine as well. If there is a ski swap near where you live you could probably find a pair of old beaters for less than 300$ with bindings.

post #3 of 11

I also think a slalom ski is a good ski to train on, I always start the season on my cheater slaloms, the let you know very quickly if you are not in the proper position.

post #4 of 11
Thread Starter 

Thanks guys, it seems like some sort of slalom ski is the way to go. Any suggestions when looking for a used pair? Brands/Models? I wouldn't be against buidling a used ski quiver if I could find each pair for around $300; maybe pick up a used all-mountain and powder ski in addition to the slalom ski.

post #5 of 11

You can always look at:  http://www.ski-depot.com/ or eBay for used or older-model skis.

post #6 of 11
Quote:
Thanks guys, it seems like some sort of slalom ski is the way to go. Any suggestions when looking for a used pair? Brands/Models? I wouldn't be against buidling a used ski quiver if I could find each pair for around $300; maybe pick up a used all-mountain and powder ski in addition to the slalom ski.

pm coming your way....

post #7 of 11

You can go to:

 

http://www.skiervillage.com/forumdisplay.php?40-Building-Blocks-Instruction-Discussion

 

and ask Rick Schnellman himself.  He'll answer in a day, I bet.

post #8 of 11

The term "drill" may have thrown some here off target; intermediate to advanced seems more relevant. I'm trying to picture 50 days in CO on a slalom ski, and it isn't pretty. Not saying you should go buy a 88-98 mm do-all, but something with a bit more flex and width will probably make you happiest. Look at the reviews in the Gear forum on <80 mm skis, plenty of excellent carvers that have the ability to handle a few inches of fresh or crud nicely and thrive in bumps. A true SL, by contrast, will want to constantly be on edge, will punish you for relatively small mistakes, and will barf if required to ski bumps or crud. Which have both been known to occur in Colorado. If you want to become a racer, or generally thrive on negative reinforcement, then by all means get a SL. If you want to become a better all around skier with an eye to Colorado powder down the road, and want to ski anywhere next season outside cold recently groomed, then get something like a Blizzard 7.6, or Kastle FX78, or Rossignol Avenger 82, or Fischer Progressor 1000 C Line, well you get the idea.  

 

Wait for the "I rock trees on my WC slalom" crowd's response, but they'll need to deposit their social security checks first... wink.gif

post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

The term "drill" may have thrown some here off target; intermediate to advanced seems more relevant. I'm trying to picture 50 days in CO on a slalom ski, and it isn't pretty. Not saying you should go buy a 88-98 mm do-all, but something with a bit more flex and width will probably make you happiest. Look at the reviews in the Gear forum on <80 mm skis, plenty of excellent carvers that have the ability to handle a few inches of fresh or crud nicely and thrive in bumps. A true SL, by contrast, will want to constantly be on edge, will punish you for relatively small mistakes, and will barf if required to ski bumps or crud. Which have both been known to occur in Colorado. If you want to become a racer, or generally thrive on negative reinforcement, then by all means get a SL. If you want to become a better all around skier with an eye to Colorado powder down the road, and want to ski anywhere next season outside cold recently groomed, then get something like a Blizzard 7.6, or Kastle FX78, or Rossignol Avenger 82, or Fischer Progressor 1000 C Line, well you get the idea.  

 

Wait for the "I rock trees on my WC slalom" crowd's response, but they'll need to deposit their social security checks first... wink.gif

 

^^^^this.  While I am looking for some used 165 SL skis for this winter to see what they have to teach me, last year I did my learning on 77mm, 170cm Hart Pulses; in the same family as all the skis Beyond mentioned (I'd sell them to you, but another Bear already has them in his quiver).  This included a two-day clinic in knee deep pow, and they were good for that and all the way down to hardpack.  Granted it was not a banner year, but I skied 20 days in Summit Co. and Tahoe on these and Kastle MX88s, laughing all the way (HA HA HA!).

 

Why did I get rid of the Harts?  I am a sucker for all things new and shiny... I now own 2013 Blizzard Magnum 8.0s (thank you Starthaus), still in the same category as all of the above.

 

I'm hoping to be a CO resident soon, m'self.  Got my Epic pass just in case. beercheer.gif

post #10 of 11

Get a 1 step down from true racing SL ski, e.g. a Fischer WC SC, in a 165 cm.  I own that ski.  While it is a bit tricky in deep crud, and there are better choices for bumps, it is easy enough to ski in bumps; it is not as unforgiving as some folk would have you believe.  I recommend a a longer ski with less sidecut for deep days, crud days and high-speed skiing, but you can get an old one of those for cheap too.

 

Good Luck.

post #11 of 11

A drilling ski or learning ski is one that enables the task the best. If you're learning to balance on one foot for example a slightly wider midfat will give you a little more of a base to find your balance on .However once edged it will only turn as well as it's sidecut allows . Sidecut is an important feature to cause you to turn. A wider ski isn't so useful when it is harder to get on edge and takes longer to do so, A narrower ski will tip and turn much quicker but it has a finer point of balance.

 

I'd want a ski in the high 70's for most of what Rick has put before you. A ski with plenty of sidecut so you can gain confidence  in attaining the different states of balance and edging . I'd also not get the stiffest ski  but one you can learn to bend to compliment other means of turning a ski.

 

An indermediate-advanced ski around 75-78 mm wide, with a turn radius near 15 and fitted more on the short end while avoiding a ski that is long for you, very stiff and has little sidecut.

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