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Best Helmet for Oversized Goggles

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

Hi,

 

I've "lurked" on the forum for a while and this is my first post. Appologies if this has been discussed before, I looked through the archives but didn't find any matches.

 

I recently bought a pair of the Von Zipper Fishbowl Goggles and am having trouble finding a helmet that will fit comfortably around them. The brim on most helmets is too low and pushes the oversized goggles down over my nose. The technical descriprion of the goggles says that they are "helmet compatable" but a lot of sales points say they are too big and should be worn alone.

 

So, does anyone know of a helmet that is compatable with the oversized goggles? At least one that doesn't make you look like a Conehead.

 

Thanks,

 

BW.

post #2 of 18
Thread Starter 

Maybe I should have made it a Harald Harb question....or is this site just dead in the summer?

post #3 of 18

BW,

 

I’m guessing the lack of response might have something to do with the relative obscurity of Von Zipper Fishbowl Goggles and just how “oversize” they really are. 

 

In my case, when I bought the Smith Knowledge Turbo-fan goggles designed for use over glasses I also neglected to take my helmet with me when shopping for goggles.  The Smith Turbofans are (relatively) big goggles (much larger than the Smith I/Os I’ll use this season since I got contacts for skiing) and would not work with my Giro G10 helmet (pushed goggles down on my nose).  Went helmet shopping with the new goggles and after trying on everything I could find eventually determined that the Smith Variant-Brim helmet worked perfectly with the “oversize” goggles. 

Imagine that, Smith helmets being compatible with Smith goggles – sometimes I’m a little slowconfused.gif.  (Though it was only the Variant-Brim model that worked for me). 

 

Thus you might give that helmet a try.  Bottom line; don’t shop for one without the other.  

 

And BTW, curious what prompted you to choose the “Von Zippers” given the excellent selection of more mainstream - read “helmet compatible” -  goggles available these days?

post #4 of 18

Unsure if you already were aware but there sometimes is an adjustment in the back of the helmet to help adjust the vertical positioning.  Be sure you try out the different settings.

 

But yea, everyone's head is different, so you will have to just try it out.

post #5 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdleuck View Post

BW,

 

I’m guessing the lack of response might have something to do with the relative obscurity of Von Zipper Fishbowl Goggles and just how “oversize” they really are. 

 

In my case, when I bought the Smith Knowledge Turbo-fan goggles designed for use over glasses I also neglected to take my helmet with me when shopping for goggles.  The Smith Turbofans are (relatively) big goggles (much larger than the Smith I/Os I’ll use this season since I got contacts for skiing) and would not work with my Giro G10 helmet (pushed goggles down on my nose).  Went helmet shopping with the new goggles and after trying on everything I could find eventually determined that the Smith Variant-Brim helmet worked perfectly with the “oversize” goggles. 

Imagine that, Smith helmets being compatible with Smith goggles – sometimes I’m a little slowconfused.gif.  (Though it was only the Variant-Brim model that worked for me). 

 

Thus you might give that helmet a try.  Bottom line; don’t shop for one without the other.  

 

And BTW, curious what prompted you to choose the “Von Zippers” given the excellent selection of more mainstream - read “helmet compatible” -  goggles available these days?

Thanks for the reply. There are a couple of Smith helmets people are recommending, like the Varient, Holt and Maze. Other brands have been the Giro Shiv and POC Bug.

 

This really is my fault and comes from never wearing a helmet before. Sorry, I know I'm meant to, but never got around to it until my kids started to ski and I needed to set an example. I liked the look of the Von Zippers and had tried them on before, so when they came up at a deep dicount in a sale, I grabbed a pair. Their own advertising blurb also claims then to be "helmet compatable".

 

The first helmet I bought, and used last season with my old goggles, was just a $30 Big Five special. So for next season I wanted to upgrade to a better helmet, that also fits my new goggles. I have been taking my Fishbowls with me to the various ski stores and trying them on with as the helmets, but no luck so far.

 

I guess I just imagined that most goggles would fit with most helmets. Can't go back to the beanie now my kids expect more of me.

post #6 of 18

I've used some thick foam weatherstripping inside my helmet to bump it up about an 1/8th inch to give my goggles a little more room between helmet and nose.  It worked out for me, not sure what impact it would have should I actually bash my head though.

 

See what I did there?

 

Seriously though, a helmet with a few minor comfort adjustments is better than no helmet, and for me, better than a helmet that scrunches goggles down on the bridge of the nose.

post #7 of 18

In my experience, jdleuck has it completely right: the Smith Variant Brim helmets have better clearance than other designs. My wife had this exact problem and the only helmet that would even remotely work was the Variant Brim.

 

But it doesn't have to be that model in particular. Like belly buttons, helmets seem to divide themselves into two broad categories: innies and outies. The innies like the Variant Brim have brims that are concave, that is the inner surface is cupped inwards. The reason for this is often that the brim is actually a designed element using more than one material (foam + plastic). These fit oversized goggles the best.

 

Many other helmets -- particularly the less expensive ones -- have molded foam brims that bulge outwards. Probably this is cheaper to manufacture. I have found that these helmets tend to contact the goggles in the middle of the bulge, wasting precious millimeters. Imagine squashing your goggles just 5mm down your nose and spending the whole day like that. Recipe for a snotty nose, in my experience.

 

By sheer coincidence my OSBE "visor" ski helmet has loads of room for my Smith TurboFan goggles. Of course with that capacious helmet I don't wear goggles at all: there is so much airflow underneath the visor that my glasses simply never fog over.

post #8 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

I've used some thick foam weatherstripping inside my helmet to bump it up about an 1/8th inch to give my goggles a little more room between helmet and nose.  It worked out for me, not sure what impact it would have should I actually bash my head though.

 

 

Thanks for the suggestion. I wonder if I might be able to cut out some of the foam under the brim, instead of adding to it. It might have the same effect as your weather stripping. It only needs about an eighth of an inch to fit. I don't really care, but it may change the integrity of the helmet.

post #9 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Albireo View Post

In my experience, jdleuck has it completely right: the Smith Variant Brim helmets have better clearance than other designs. My wife had this exact problem and the only helmet that would even remotely work was the Variant Brim.

 

The Variant Brim does come up the most often as the best fit for oversized goggles, but many say the brim breaks off very easily, sometimes in the box during shipping. I wonder if the non brim Variant has the same fit?

 

I'm hitting the ski shps for their summer sales this weekend and I'm taking my goggles with me.

 

Ilike your belly button analogy. Never knew there was a difference like that, good observation.

post #10 of 18

Beat my Variant Brim all the time.  Brim still intact.  Get it.

post #11 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by erik jorgenson View Post

Beat my Variant Brim all the time.  Brim still intact.  Get it.

 

By coincidence, I tried one on today at Ski Pro. Very comfortable and it does accomadate the oversize goggles. To be honest, I didn't like the look of the brim and it does get in the way of sliding your goggles up. Two good features are the plentiful vents and the fit adjustment system. I shave my head so usually wear a skull cap with a helmet, but the Variant does have a soft, comfortable liner. as well.

 

These were new 2013 models and were retailing for $170. I looked online and can get last season's brimless version on BackCountry for about $68 with free shipping. At that price you have to go for bright purple or gunmetal. Gunmetal suits me fine!

 

Thanks for all the advice guys, think I've found my new lid.

post #12 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by erik jorgenson View Post

Beat my Variant Brim all the time.  Brim still intact.  Get it.

 

Just to follow up on this. I went to Backcountry to order the helmet and checked out the reviews. There are seventeen reviews for the brim version and over half of them complain about the brim easily breaking. The problem then appears to be that the brim is not detachable, but an integral part of the helmet. When the brim breaks the helmet starts to separate. Almost everyone does say how warm, comfortable and well fitting the helmet is. they also praise the vents. of course it does come brimless.

 

Just for reference I found the popular colors and sizes on St Bernard Sports for $70 less than Backcountry.

 

BW

post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bad Wolf View Post

 

Just to follow up on this. I went to Backcountry to order the helmet and checked out the reviews. There are seventeen reviews for the brim version and over half of them complain about the brim easily breaking. The problem then appears to be that the brim is not detachable, but an integral part of the helmet. When the brim breaks the helmet starts to separate. Almost everyone does say how warm, comfortable and well fitting the helmet is. they also praise the vents. of course it does come brimless.

 

Just for reference I found the popular colors and sizes on St Bernard Sports for $70 less than Backcountry.

 

BW

 

Generally speaking these are supposed to.  Brims, or mouth guards etc act like a lever which can break your neck if they catch on ground in a fall, etc.  Hence they are designed to be "break away".  Helmets should be replaced after impacts.  However, I personally wouldnt worry about it, as helmets have almost no safety benefit for most people.

post #14 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skidude72 View Post

 

Generally speaking these are supposed to.  Brims, or mouth guards etc act like a lever which can break your neck if they catch on ground in a fall, etc.  Hence they are designed to be "break away".  Helmets should be replaced after impacts.  However, I personally wouldnt worry about it, as helmets have almost no safety benefit for most people.

 

Because most people never fall on their heads or because helmets don't work when they do, or......

post #15 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bad Wolf View Post

 

Because most people never fall on their heads or because helmets don't work when they do, or......

Well not to open this can of worms.  But generally both.  Do your own research on this subject, and believe who you choose.  Many propenents for and against.  2 statistics I generally go by are: There are 0.5 head injuries per million skier visits.  There are 2.5 head injuries per million car trips.  Meaning, you are far more likley to suffer a head injury driving to and from the ski hill then you are skiing, ie you are better off wearing your helmet in the car.  Second, it is fair to say significantley more people use helmets today, then they did say 10 years ago.  If helmets do offer a tangible benefit, then surely there would have been a reduction in the number of head injuries associated with skiing in that time, right?  Well there hasnt been.  Head injury rates have remained constant.  This has caused some issues at places like Whistler, where SS is now required to wear helmets while in uniform, yet Ski Patrol isnt.  While not public, WB acknowledges to staff there is no evidence supporting helmet use...its more of "band wagon" thing. 

 

For reference, I am not against helmets.  I have used one from well over 30 years having been an active ski racer.  But I wore them for racing only.  I still think for certain things people should wear helmets, racing, park and pipe or if you are ripping at high speed around rocks etc on big mountain lines.  But that is not most people, who cruise or ski marked trails at moderate speed.  The push to helmets has been driven by clever marketing, not much else.

 

 

 

 

And now there will be 100 posts of people telling of how their helmet saved their life while they were skiing.rolleyes.gif

post #16 of 18
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skidude72 View Post

Well not to open this can of worms.  But generally both.  Do your own research on this subject, and believe who you choose.  Many propenents for and against.  2 statistics I generally go by are: There are 0.5 head injuries per million skier visits.  There are 2.5 head injuries per million car trips.  Meaning, you are far more likley to suffer a head injury driving to and from the ski hill then you are skiing, ie you are better off wearing your helmet in the car.  Second, it is fair to say significantley more people use helmets today, then they did say 10 years ago.  If helmets do offer a tangible benefit, then surely there would have been a reduction in the number of head injuries associated with skiing in that time, right?  Well there hasnt been.  Head injury rates have remained constant.  This has caused some issues at places like Whistler, where SS is now required to wear helmets while in uniform, yet Ski Patrol isnt.  While not public, WB acknowledges to staff there is no evidence supporting helmet use...its more of "band wagon" thing. 

 

For reference, I am not against helmets.  I have used one from well over 30 years having been an active ski racer.  But I wore them for racing only.  I still think for certain things people should wear helmets, racing, park and pipe or if you are ripping at high speed around rocks etc on big mountain lines.  But that is not most people, who cruise or ski marked trails at moderate speed.  The push to helmets has been driven by clever marketing, not much else.

 

 

 

 

And now there will be 100 posts of people telling of how their helmet saved their life while they were skiing.rolleyes.gif

 

Statistical studies are always hard to interpret, you never really know what you are measuring and reporting. Statistically, being in a car is the most dangerous thing we do. Just not being in a car, no matter what you are doing, is inherently safer, but that does not mean it is without avoidable risk.

 

I never used to wear a helmet skiing back in the seventies and eighties. I never wore one on a skateboard, in line skates or on a bicycle. I didn't want to wear one on a my motorcycle, but the law made me.  I hate wearing one when I spar (Tae Kwon Do) but I can't compete without one. I'm not making a political or freedom of choice statement, I just grew up without them and find wearing them an inconvenience, despite the risk.

 

I wear one now because I expect my kids to do the same. It's not such a big deal. They keep your head warm, play your music and might save you from a dribble rag and feeding tube. Working in the medical field for over twenty years and seeing the results of some of these statistical improbabilities, has also changed my Cavalier attitude. Now, if I could just find one to fit my Fishbowls.

 

BW

post #17 of 18

Smith Brim helmets are useless with smith power goggles, the phucking brim is in the way of putting the goggles on and taking them off...
 

post #18 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skidude72 View Post

Well not to open this can of worms.  But generally both.  Do your own research on this subject, and believe who you choose.  Many propenents for and against.  2 statistics I generally go by are: There are 0.5 head injuries per million skier visits.  There are 2.5 head injuries per million car trips.  Meaning, you are far more likley to suffer a head injury driving to and from the ski hill then you are skiing, ie you are better off wearing your helmet in the car.  Second, it is fair to say significantley more people use helmets today, then they did say 10 years ago.  If helmets do offer a tangible benefit, then surely there would have been a reduction in the number of head injuries associated with skiing in that time, right?  Well there hasnt been.  Head injury rates have remained constant.  This has caused some issues at places like Whistler, where SS is now required to wear helmets while in uniform, yet Ski Patrol isnt.  While not public, WB acknowledges to staff there is no evidence supporting helmet use...its more of "band wagon" thing. 

 

 

Driving to Alpine Meadows from the north, a line of cars a quarter mile long turning into Squaw valley--guy passes them all on the wrong side of a double yellow and pulls in behind me (wife and kids in the car).  We Turn in to AM Road--covered with ice. guy passes me on a blind curve/double yellow and arrives at the parking lot (30 seconds before us) gets out, puts on a helmet, and goes skiing. Go figure. (A few choice words were said--don't piss off my wife).

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