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long time no TR (NSR-style)

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

where do I start?

 

it's been a while...  some photos?

 

i guess we should start with Aiden...

 

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then maybe some wildflowers?

 

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maybe a dog in some flowers?  Esme-lou...

 

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summer could be baseball?

 

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or gardens?

 

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or thunderstorms...

 

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but definitely mountains

 

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and streams...

 

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and first camping trips

 

 

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and taking dogs swimming

 

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bikes...

 

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...to ride for beers...

 

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sunrises...

 

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...followed by coffee...

 

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...pale, when contrasted with time spent with those you love

 

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yet thoughts of winter storms returning

 

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can, and do, make us drool with anticipation

 

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thanks for readin'...

post #2 of 16

Its been too long Splitter. 

 

Thanks for sharing. 

 

Oh and Aiden........you are soooo handsome!

post #3 of 16
Nice trip!
post #4 of 16

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Sureal

 

Thanks!

post #5 of 16

Good to see you and yours.  Thanks!

post #6 of 16

Man, your life is a great TR. 

post #7 of 16

Nice photos with he slow shutter speeds (water), HDR(?), and, of course, Aiden!

post #8 of 16
Thread Starter 

thanks for taking a look folks...  I've been a little absent from the forum.

 

@quant, no HDR, all single exposure.  Some employ a GND filter.

 

I'll use an ND for slow shutter speed stuff, but the fuzzy water in these photos were just taken in low-light with a stopped down aperture.  Maybe a CP on the bridge shot.  I don't recall.

post #9 of 16

I really really want to get with you to learn more about using my camera to its potential. 

I know I could do more with this stuff but just don't know enough to do it. 

 

Paling in comparison these are a few shots I took during the storm a few weeks ago. 

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And the next morning the sun breaking through the clouds over Reno. 

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post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trekchick View Post

And the next morning the sun breaking through the clouds over Reno. 

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 Tricia, this photo demonstrates one of the differences between your photos and Splitters.  Notice the amount of contrast in your photo?  It causes the clouds to wash out (the highlights get blown) while the dynamic range of the camera can't compensate for the shadows.  There's just too much contrast.

 

This is where a GND (graduated neutral density) filter can help.  Basically, a GND filter has a section where the light just passes through, but it also has a section that is graduated where the light is diminished.  It also usually has a line demarcing the two sections.  So, you position the filter so that the clear section would bascially be the lower portion of your photo while positioning the light blocking part for the clouds.  This reduces the dynamic range and allows the photo to more accurately portray what your eye sees.  A GND filter is one of the best tools you can add to your photo kit.

 

Mike

post #11 of 16

Glad to see you posting again Splitter. Guess that you've been busy with Aiden and your Make A Photograph Every Day project. Both endeavors seem to be going very well. Thanks for sharing.

post #12 of 16
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the comments folks...

 

@tc, mike has a good observation, 

 

so often people's foregrounds are too dark or the skies are blown because the sky is typically brighter then the ground, especially if there isn't snow.

 

Filters will help this.  I usually have a CP on my lens in the mountains, unless it is an ultra wide lens (the yellow flowers, esme, the baseball stadium, the truck in the storm, the waterfall, aiden camping, the bike, the beer, the coffee and the snowy dock were all shot with an UWA (ultra wide angle).  On those lenses, a CP will streak the sky.  CP's work really well to make skies blue.

 

When you have clouds, often you'll need a GND (or two, as in the sunrise on the train tracks) to hold back the bright sky so you can expose longer for a nice visible, balanced foreground)  

 

The sidelight you have coming in on the first golden shot lights the scene up more evenly so a GND isn't necessary.

 

Composition-wise, you are following the rule of thirds but there isn't a compelling part of the image that tells the story.  With each photograph (as opposed to snapshot), you should be communicating a certain POV or storyline.

 

The light breaking through the clouds is interesting, but because that is blown, it isn't successful.  Also, a stronger foreground element to anchor the image will help the viewer's eyes travel through the image better.

 

In the golden shot, other than the nice light, there isn't anything compelling or interesting in the photo.  It's hard to make a suburban shot interesting, but a leading line of a suburban wall into a home that is chopped off on one side isn't extremely successful.  

 

Another thing to consider is one's eyes always tend towards the brightest part of the image.  A successful photo will have lines leading you to that part of the image so you can travel through the image.

 

If you have really even lighting or are going for an abstract, these guidelines might not always ring true.  Rules are made to be broken.  


One of the better things I did to improve my composition was to start using a prime lens (non zoom).  For your crop sensor SLR, I'd pick up a 35mm 1.8 or 1.2, whatever the fastest you can get/afford.

 

Without the ability to zoom, it will often force you to find photos you might overlook if you can zoom your way in and out of the immediate area.  The large aperture will also help you selectively focus (small vs. large Depth of field) and that in turn, is helpful with story-telling or highlighting a specific aspect of the frame.

 

Shooting with a tripod isn't always necessary or possible, but that will also slow down your compositions and force photographer's to think more critically.  You'll also get sharper images when you stop down to gain the correct exposure level.

 

The photo/video forum is awfully quiet around here.  Maybe a critique/share thread would be a beneficial addition to the community.

post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by splitter View Post

Thanks for the comments folks...

 

@tc, mike has a good observation, 

 

so often people's foregrounds are too dark or the skies are blown because the sky is typically brighter then the ground, especially if there isn't snow.

 

Filters will help this.  I usually have a CP on my lens in the mountains, unless it is an ultra wide lens (the yellow flowers, esme, the baseball stadium, the truck in the storm, the waterfall, aiden camping, the bike, the beer, the coffee and the snowy dock were all shot with an UWA (ultra wide angle).  On those lenses, a CP will streak the sky.  CP's work really well to make skies blue.

 

When you have clouds, often you'll need a GND (or two, as in the sunrise on the train tracks) to hold back the bright sky so you can expose longer for a nice visible, balanced foreground)  

 

The sidelight you have coming in on the first golden shot lights the scene up more evenly so a GND isn't necessary.

 

Composition-wise, you are following the rule of thirds but there isn't a compelling part of the image that tells the story.  With each photograph (as opposed to snapshot), you should be communicating a certain POV or storyline.

 

The light breaking through the clouds is interesting, but because that is blown, it isn't successful.  Also, a stronger foreground element to anchor the image will help the viewer's eyes travel through the image better.

 

In the golden shot, other than the nice light, there isn't anything compelling or interesting in the photo.  It's hard to make a suburban shot interesting, but a leading line of a suburban wall into a home that is chopped off on one side isn't extremely successful.  

 

Another thing to consider is one's eyes always tend towards the brightest part of the image.  A successful photo will have lines leading you to that part of the image so you can travel through the image.

 

If you have really even lighting or are going for an abstract, these guidelines might not always ring true.  Rules are made to be broken.  


One of the better things I did to improve my composition was to start using a prime lens (non zoom).  For your crop sensor SLR, I'd pick up a 35mm 1.8 or 1.2, whatever the fastest you can get/afford.

 

Without the ability to zoom, it will often force you to find photos you might overlook if you can zoom your way in and out of the immediate area.  The large aperture will also help you selectively focus (small vs. large Depth of field) and that in turn, is helpful with story-telling or highlighting a specific aspect of the frame.

 

Shooting with a tripod isn't always necessary or possible, but that will also slow down your compositions and force photographer's to think more critically.  You'll also get sharper images when you stop down to gain the correct exposure level.

 

The photo/video forum is awfully quiet around here.  Maybe a critique/share thread would be a beneficial addition to the community.

I agree and I think its time to get some new flow going in there. 

post #14 of 16


 

 

 

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Solid pictorial dominated storytelling mon compadre!

 

Question: where is this snappy shot?

post #15 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dookey67 View Post



 

 

 

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Solid pictorial dominated storytelling mon compadre!

 

Question: where is this snappy shot?

thanks dook, 

 

that is lake aloha, pyramid is the peak on the left...

 

another shot for a smidge more context

 

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post #16 of 16

Sweet. And thanks for the reveal.

Yet another spot to add to the "gotta hike/ski there sometime in the near future list" (still gotta hit Echo Lake one of these days, too!).

 

But enough about me. Again, sweet pix. Loved the brevity of words mixed with alluring images greatly.

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