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Becoming a Ski Instructor - Gear Advice - Page 2

post #31 of 45

One other consideration I didn't see touched on here yet (maybe someone else did but I missed it?).  If you truly are going with a one ski quiver, you'll need something that really can lay down rails when tested.  There will be all kinds of instructor advanced training clinics you'll be required to participate in, and possibly a little racing for bragging rights amongst the crew.  I'd go with something a bit beyond the typical all mountain ski and more along the carving or racing side.  Last time I checked, the fat skis hadn't proliferated throughout Europe quite to the extent of the US and Canada.  For the first year stay on the conservative side until you've proven you chops to everyone.  Then, once established, go with whatever you really love to ski on. 

post #32 of 45

 "If you truly are going with a one ski quiver, you'll need something that really can lay down rails when tested."

 

 

A number of skis have been already mentioned that would well suit Keith's 'one work/training ski'  requirements and meet your criteria as well.

If you can't 'lay down the rails' on an MX88, E98, S 800, Blizzard 8.0 or .5, etc... you've got bigger problems. Racing skills are required for full cert. in most if not all European nat'l associations. When he's ready for that part of his cert process, I'm guessing he'll find access to the tools he'll need. 

post #33 of 45
Quote:
If you can't 'lay down the rails' on an MX88, E98, S 800, Blizzard 8.0 or .5, etc... you've got bigger problems.

It's one thing to be able to lay some decent, clean carved, tracks on a high 80s or high 90s waisted ski.  It is quite another thing to be able to look as good or better on them as the seasoned guy in front of you and girl behind in the clinic or candidates line laying railroad tracks down on something mid 60s.  If OP's blowing away (or even looking close to) high level instructors skiing on race gear whilst skiing on a 98 yourself he really shouldn't have anything to worry about or be asking what kind of ski we recommend.

 

I'm just passing on advice I think would be helpful to a new, possibly not that experienced instructor candidate might find helpful and give them some insights as to what they might encounter that I didn't think of before my first instructor training camp.  I made it by the skin of my teeth and quickly upgraded from a freestyle/bump specific ski adding a decent SL to the quiver after getting hired.  I used the bump ski for beginner lessons and the SL for clinics and advanced folks.

post #34 of 45

I once had a private lesson to see how good in skiing ability I would have to be to be an instructor and it was more about being able to carve a ski at real slow speeds which you will be examined on your ability to do. You will want a narrow short slalom ski for this. When I had my lesson I was on old 205cm GS Racing skis and I found slow carving impossible with them which was something the instructor should have pointed out to me. If its financially possible you could always use a pair of Mid Fats for intermediate and advanced level instructing where off piste skiing will

be done. 

post #35 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

It's one thing to be able to lay some decent, clean carved, tracks on a high 80s or high 90s waisted ski.  It is quite another thing to be able to look as good or better on them as the seasoned guy in front of you and girl behind in the clinic or candidates line laying railroad tracks down on something mid 60s.  If OP's blowing away (or even looking close to) high level instructors skiing on race gear whilst skiing on a 98 yourself he really shouldn't have anything to worry about or be asking what kind of ski we recommend.

 

I'm just passing on advice I think would be helpful to a new, possibly not that experienced instructor candidate might find helpful and give them some insights as to what they might encounter that I didn't think of before my first instructor training camp.  I made it by the skin of my teeth and quickly upgraded from a freestyle/bump specific ski adding a decent SL to the quiver after getting hired.  I used the bump ski for beginner lessons and the SL for clinics and advanced folks.

 

 

My last post on the subject, but probably the most frequently seen skis on the PNW demo team/div. examiners were the E98's last season. Lot's of off piste... sometimes nice, sometimes gloppy. You get the picture. The skinniest ski we see out here regularly for high level demo/training/teaching are skis like the Head Titan (77mm and another one to add to Keith's list perhaps) and Rossi, what were they?, but I think 72mm underfoot. No doubt most instructors out this way would ski something narrower for work if we were on the east coast, but at this point none of this is really germane to the OP's initial question. It isn't about us, but it is all about location! location! location! Mileage varies considerably.  :)


Edited by markojp - 8/12/12 at 7:21pm
post #36 of 45

A teaching ski is nice when it is versatile,has shape to tip and turn and you don't whine when a herd of kids ski across it.

 

SJ has you on a good track. I don't think much about it since it's the bottoms you ski so buy what works best on where you ski the most. Shorter than usual makes you more nimble. A good trait when people watch your every move in demos.

post #37 of 45

As others have pointed out, beginner students will trash the hell out of your skis, carving very deep scratches with the edges of their skis.  So you should buy a cheap ski so that it won't break your heart or make you upset when someone runs over it.

 

Another thing to consider is you will be in and out of your skis a lot carrying them around, etc.  Heavy, long, stiff giant slalom skis are the wrong tool for the job.

 

Last year I purchased a 300$ pair of 2005 Atomic Izor skis brand new that the store had been unable to sell for all these years.  It's a very lightweight, very agile ski, that is great for short radius turns, easy to get in and out of, and easy to transport (lightweight!).  I find that students tend less to run over my skis when they are short :) 

 

I keep my better skis for my personal use.

post #38 of 45

Keith:

When you start skiing on the tops of your skis you should start worrying about your students walking on them.  As you seek to advance your certifications you'll be tested on maneuvers at the speed you teach them so get used to slow speed maneuvers on good skis by skiing on them daily.  Teach on performance carving skis, train on them and get tested on them.  Hopefully the same pair each time.

 

If your boots are properly set for ramp angle, comfortable with the necessary room to use your foot, your binding delta and position are correct then the list of skis that are too difficult to ski for instructor slow speed maneuvers is short and I'll say for the most part the skis names will end in GS, SG or DH.

 

Lou

post #39 of 45

Clear, spot on, and concise from Lou. Thread over. smile.gif

post #40 of 45

Amigo has it pretty much right in my opinion.  To pass your level 2 (or higher) in most of the common Ski instructor qualifications you will need to be able to demo a good short turn at a decent speed, but you will also need to be able to ski slowly and controlled making varying radius turns as demos in lessons.  

 

You need to go for a ski that isn't super stiff and isn't too long.  You should probably aim to get something about 5cm shorter than you would usually use, as some people have said before, as it does make your demos a little easier to master, and of course the little ones are going to ski over the backs of them in ever lift line anyway.

 

If you are only going to take one pair with you, a lot of instructors use the Head Supershapes as they are very light, but great for carving and they are not too wide either.  That would be one ski to take a serious look at.  The Fisher GS range have some good options too and a lot of higher level instructors choose those too.

 

Hope this helps!

post #41 of 45

One other consideration--make sure the graphics are family-friendly (shouldn't be a problem if you don't get twin tips though.) 

post #42 of 45
If you were going to buy, I would get some used volkl rtm 84s
post #43 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriso10299 View Post

If you were going to buy, I would get some used volkl rtm 84s



It might be safer to say, "if I were going to buy, these would be my top 5 choices and here's why..." But I do like the offer for someone else to buy you used skis! Pretty cheeky! smile.gif
post #44 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriso10299 View Post

If you were going to buy, I would get some used volkl rtm 84s

One of the best skiers I know wasn't happy with these skis and neither were we to see her on them.  What is good for one may be a disaster for another. Some people like to feel their tips, with these it's a bit harder since they're bent.

post #45 of 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ View Post

One of the best skiers I know wasn't happy with these skis and neither were we to see her on them.  What is good for one may be a disaster for another. Some people like to feel their tips, with these it's a bit harder since they're bent.

The real problem with these..and all these type of skis with the "U" shape is they have no camber at all.  Early rise with a conventional camber is expensive to manufacture, so the flat ski with early rise was a cheap alternative.  Instead of wearing skis out, you can now buy them "pre-worn" with no camber at all straight off the wall!  Progress!

 

I dont know anyone who can ski who likes these. 

 

Early rise sure...but you still want camber underfoot.

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