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post #31 of 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by rossymcg View Post

just been out to ski on the glacier in Tignes for a few days as part of a road trip through europe, for the 1st time ive actually got some footage of myself skiing and i was quite shocked,

so i'm after your in put please, i can clearly see a few things wrong but will wait untill you pro's have pointed out ins and outs till i comment myself

cheers everyone

 

rossymcg,   Watching your video, two things jump out at me.  First, this is not skiing that can be evaluated very well because, well.... it isn't really skiing but more of a task or exercise you are demonstrating.  You are merely locking the ski on an edge and riding it wherever it wants to take you.  I hardly classify this as skiing.  I mean absolutely no offense by this just that I would rather see you making some real turns in a variety of turn shapes that you choose rather than trying to railroad track turns.

 

Secondly, your A framing is likely caused more by alignment issues than technique issues.  I would suggest having your lateral alignment parameters assessed and corrected before focusing on the technique side of A frame issues.  Many skiers tend to ignore this very important part of skiing but proper alignment can change your world instantly.

 

Best wishes in reaching your skiing goals!

bud

post #32 of 38
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro View Post

Good questions Rossy! Advanced Wedge Christies begin with the skis on opposing edges (like we see at 00:14). In riggering refers to too much weight being kept on the inside ski.

 

Both are related to our stance and balance on the skis. Suppose you picked up that inside ski? In all likely hood you would fall over to the inside of the turn. By using that inside ski to avoid falling, you in essence limit how effectively the outside ski can grip the snow. Your workaround is to add edge angle and thus the A-frame is maintained. A good corrective drill for this is to do 1000 step turns. But before trying them, walk around in a circle about 15-20 feet in diameter wearing just your ski boots. Then do the same while on skis. After you get a good feel for that move, try doing some linked turns using that same sort of move. Make sure it's on the shallowest slope you can find though. Eventually take that to steeper terrain but what is most important is the integrity of the move, not the steepness of the slope. Once you gain the experience to do this confidently, use that same basic stance to make round turns without all the stepping. You might find shuffling is an intermediate step and worth doing as you gain experience with this new stance.

 

From there the next step is to start the new turn by rolling the ankle and knee over and allowing the hips and torso to follow that knee into the new turn. (It's not enough to abduct the knee and let the core linger inside the old turn.) As this becomes ingrained in your habitual movements, I think you will find maneuvers like the White Pass Turn and one footed skiing a lot easier to accomplish.

 

BTW, I looked up the white pass turn in the book NO HILL TOO FAST because I remembered it as a variation of the serpentine move that includes a large projection of the torso. It's there. So I wonder why it was suggested otherwise. I guess different variations exist and I simply don't use that smaller RoM version. In any case, I agree with Rusty that toning down the lateral hip RoM would improve your skiing Rossy, so I would play with his version.

 

So there you have it, Aft stance due to excessive hip flex and insufficient ankle dorsi flexing, core getting too far inside the turns to maintain effective outside ski pressure and edge purchase, and a lack of dynamic fluidity due to all these stance and balance issues.

 

Rossy, as a side note. The fact that you solicited advice says you wanted us to be a bit critical of your skiing but I hope you take what we all wrote as constructive criticism. Ski well my friend,

JASP 

if you wasnt being critical JASP then there would be no point in you commenting, i like the naked facts so i can go away think about and practice them, i'm no fool and know that i have a long long way to go before i'm happy with my skiing, but fear not i'll be practicing hard in my local fridge and on my local plastic hill and hopefully i'll be a better skier come next season,

thanks for your advice,

post #33 of 38
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bud heishman View Post

 

rossymcg,   Watching your video, two things jump out at me.  First, this is not skiing that can be evaluated very well because, well.... it isn't really skiing but more of a task or exercise you are demonstrating.  You are merely locking the ski on an edge and riding it wherever it wants to take you.  I hardly classify this as skiing.  I mean absolutely no offense by this just that I would rather see you making some real turns in a variety of turn shapes that you choose rather than trying to railroad track turns.

 

Secondly, your A framing is likely caused more by alignment issues than technique issues.  I would suggest having your lateral alignment parameters assessed and corrected before focusing on the technique side of A frame issues.  Many skiers tend to ignore this very important part of skiing but proper alignment can change your world instantly.

 

Best wishes in reaching your skiing goals!

bud

Hello Bud,

No offense taken, to be truely honest youre correct, this isn't me skiing but it was sort of an exercise/task that i had my gf video for me to see what was happening with my inside knee,

seems that the A frame is being cause by a series of other things and not from the fact i'm not being active with my inside knee,

what do you mean by alignment issues?

thanks

Ross

post #34 of 38

Hi Ross. I've just seen the thread on ask the boot guys and I'm sure you'll get some good advice on there. If you're looking for help in the UK, after a lot of research I would recommend Solutions4feet in Bicester. Colin Martin is very helpful and I'm hoping to pay him a visit in the next few weeks. He may well post on your thread.

Adie

post #35 of 38
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adie View Post

Hi Ross. I've just seen the thread on ask the boot guys and I'm sure you'll get some good advice on there. If you're looking for help in the UK, after a lot of research I would recommend Solutions4feet in Bicester. Colin Martin is very helpful and I'm hoping to pay him a visit in the next few weeks. He may well post on your thread.

Adie

cheers mate, yes ive chatted with him before, i think i'm going to pop down and see him.

Adie when ever your ready for a ski pm me and we can arrange a ski session

post #36 of 38
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post

Try making your first thought in turn initiation moving the new inside knee into the turn. You need to begin that with weight still on that foot from the previous turn. Also think about making the pelvis move forward along the skis as well as toward the apex of the new turn.

seeking out white pass turns ive found this on pootube

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M9l7f-_a8Bw

just a quick question, i now understand that the weight needs to stay on the new inside edge untill the fall lineish area, at the point of putting the new outside/downhill leg down on the snow, is that the point at where in a real turn the majority weight transferes to the outside ski?

post #37 of 38

Rossy, another great question!

You accurately identified a huge difference between regular turns and white pass turns. The weight transfer is artificially delayed by keeping that outside ski off the snow. While some two footed turns would include a weight transfer that late, most involve an earlier and much more progressive weight transfer. The edge change is what I would focus on during that drill though. (Balancing on that ski while rolling it off an edge and onto the other edge.)

Same goes for the one footed skiing drill I mentioned. Both drills require us to find a well balanced lateral and fore / aft stance.

 

As far as alignment, I agree with Bud about getting your boots set up properly for you. Imagine driving a car that always pulls left verses driving one that doesn't. It just makes skiing easier when you're not fighting the equipment.

post #38 of 38

By all means pay Colin a visit!  He will be able to explain and assess your alignment needs and get you on the right track!  Tell'm Bud said hey!

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