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2012/2013 Plans - Extremely Canadian/Cat Trip

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

Hi all,

 

My wife and I are looking at what we wanna do for 2012/2013.  We're considering a couple options, and I was curious for the bears' input.

 

Option # 1 - would be a cat skiing trip, likely only a few days - probably 3 or so.

 

Option # 2 - A week in Whistler, where we book a 2 day clinic with Extremely Canadian.

[url]http://www.extremelycanadian.com/[/url]

 

I'm leaning towards Whistler/ExCan.

 

 

A little bit about us, we both skied as kids, and took a 10+ year hiatus in our teens.  Started skiing again a few years ago.  We cna ski everything at our local resort (Lake Louise), but we're certainly far from expert skiers.  We've been saying that we should get some more lessons for awhile now, just never gotten around to it.

 

So, thoughts?  Has anybody skied with Extremely Canadian before?

post #2 of 13

A less than helpful comment would be that if you can ski everything Lake Louise you must be expert skiers. Your cat ski objective would be to ski untracked powder but I am curious to know what you would hope to achieve with Extremely Canadian?

post #3 of 13

Extremely Canadian quote from the 2 day clinic- umm, and you're not experts? Are you just being modest? Is this the wrong clinic? If you aren't really experts then is this a clinic you will enjoy and benefit from? If you really are experts or at least advanced skiers, this could be a lot of fun but this is much different from skiing deep and steep fresh pow lines...

 

Quote

"You will discover both the best of Whistler Blackcomb’s insane steeps and the best of your skills" 

 

 

My vote is to ski pow in BC but if you are not experts or at least advanced skiers, can you ski deep and steep pow? 

post #4 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrendonR View Post

...

 

So, thoughts?  Has anybody skied with Extremely Canadian before?

 

G'day. Decisions, decisions wot? Cat skiing or Whistler? Can't go wrong with either IMHO, I'm hoping to do some cat or heli this season and take it up a couple of notches.

 

I skied with Extremely Canadian last April, did the 2-day clinic as well and I highly recommend it. They'll start by doing an evaluation (ours was on a slope just off Pika's) then split you into groups based on ability. If you can ski everything at Lake Louise you'll be fine.  Their instruction/guiding is top notch, they have lift line privileges so no lineups and they'll get you skiing anywhere you want on either hill. If you're a CSIA level 3, you'd still get benefit from lessons with them. I reckon even a CSIA level 4 could learn a few things about skiing steep terrain from that crew.

 

FWIW, I was in the slow group but we did Sapphire Bowl, the Couloir (False Face entrance) and the Blowhole on the 2nd day. All were on my bucket list but I wasn't sure I was good enough to tackle them. I'm so looking forward to  skiing them again this season! I will

do another two days with them again - group size is smaller than WB's ski school and they are geared more towards the terrain I enjoy skiing. Wendy Brookbank was our guide but Peter (the owner) spent half the first day with us as well.

 

I clocked in at nearly 85km/h TRYING to keep Wendy in sight as we skied Blackcomb top to bottom to finish day 2 - and she had a pair of skis over one shoulder! 

 

Hope this helps. Feel free to post or PM with any other questions about them or the program. 

post #5 of 13

I don't think you need a guide for whistler. The layout is pretty straight forward. except for off peak chair in a whiteout. 

post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the thoughts everyone.

 

When I say that my Wife and I can ski everything at Lake Louise, I do NOT necessarily mean that it'll be pretty.  Perhaps it's more of a Buzz Lightyear, "Flying vs. 'Falling with Style'" analogy.  Can I ski Whitehorn II Chutes?  Yeah.  Is it pretty, smooth, fast?  Not as much.

 

What we hoped to achieve with Extremely Canadian was to improve our skills and build confidence in steep, off piste terrain.  If we've got a powder day, improve upon the pow-skiing as well.  Why do any of us attend clinics/lessons?  We haven't had official lessons since being kids, so were hoping to learn a thing or two.

post #7 of 13

taking lessons is a great idea, the key is not to get in over your head (a skill level that is beyond what you are looking to improve or master) or get into a lesson where you are on the low end of the skill level unless you have had this conversation with the clinic and they understand and have a group or other instructor for you. Otherwise, you proabably won't enjoy it.  Sounds like a great plan and a good way to learn steeps and such.  Cheers!

post #8 of 13

The Extremely Candadian 2 Day Clinic sounds like fun.  I think I am also going to W/BC this season and that clinic is right down my ally.  I bookmarked their website so I won't forget about them.  Thanks for the tip!

 

As for your dilema I say go to Whistler, do the 2 day clinic and then do a day of either Heli or Cat skiing, both of which are available right there in the village.

 

Ski On,

 

Rick G

post #9 of 13

Sounds like you are in a similar situation as rickg is/was in this thread.

 

Do you & your wife want to become  better skiers & take an advanced steep camp or romp the untouched pow?

 

Big Red Cats has terrain for strong intermediates & above.

post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by surfacehoar View Post

I don't think you need a guide for whistler. The layout is pretty straight forward. except for off peak chair in a whiteout. 

 

Call it "guided instruction". No need for a guide frontside but unless you're a local you won't know where the best skiing is or how to setup for it.

It helps in the bowls if you aren't familiar with the place. It's reasonably "safe" but in the steeps you can easily hit terrain traps. And if there's been no significant dumps for a week or two, they can take you to stashes (like the gunbarrel chutes in Harmony bowl) where you can still find some great fresh lines - and not worry about going off a cliff. 

Peak chair is a whole 'nother world. Once you're in those bowls (Bagel, West Cirque, Whistler) it's straightforward enough but alot of them have blind drop-ins and the entrances can become terrain traps. Even if you take Burnt Stew it can be hairy - cloud socked-in so you cannot see the wall on the left or the warning markers on the right. They don't say "advanced/expert skiers only" for nought...

The instructors are part guide in that they'll help you master some amazing terrain but they'll keep you away from something where you'll hurt yourself.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BrendonR View Post

Thanks for the thoughts everyone.

 

When I say that my Wife and I can ski everything at Lake Louise, I do NOT necessarily mean that it'll be pretty.  Perhaps it's more of a Buzz Lightyear, "Flying vs. 'Falling with Style'" analogy.  Can I ski Whitehorn II Chutes?  Yeah.  Is it pretty, smooth, fast?  Not as much.

 

What we hoped to achieve with Extremely Canadian was to improve our skills and build confidence in steep, off piste terrain.  If we've got a powder day, improve upon the pow-skiing as well.  Why do any of us attend clinics/lessons?  We haven't had official lessons since being kids, so were hoping to learn a thing or two.

 

Sounds like you'll be fine with them. They do an eval to see at what level you are comfortable skiing and won't put you in above your head. I reckon rigkg has the best compromise - ski the mountain for a few days, take the Extremely Canadian clinic then finish off with a day or two of cat skiing.

post #11 of 13
Thread Starter 

Thanks a lot for the opinions everyone.

 

It's looking like the wife and I very well may be ending up in Whistler - a couple days on our own, a couple days with Extremely Canadian, and at least one day at Scandinave Spa ;)

 

Really looking forward to this trip - and this season in general. 

post #12 of 13

My feature article on the Extremely Canadian clinic: http://www.firsttracksonline.com/2005/09/01/extremely-whistler-extremely-canadian/

Canuk1w1 has it right with regard to both the level of skiing and value of the guiding.  I had skied 10 days at Whistler/Blackcomb when I took their clinic and you will learn the mountain much faster with them as well as improve your skiing.  I have also done 2 of the Extremely Canadian World Tours: Las Lenas in 2005 and La Grave in 2008.

post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by BrendonR View Post

Thanks a lot for the opinions everyone.

 

It's looking like the wife and I very well may be ending up in Whistler - a couple days on our own, a couple days with Extremely Canadian, and at least one day at Scandinave Spa ;)

 

Really looking forward to this trip - and this season in general. 

 

Sounds like a good plan.  But if I may, one small change to improve upon your plan.  On the last day, she goes to the spa.  You go Heli!

 

Your welcome!

 

Rick G

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