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Good news for Utah skiers

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

Coming soon, season pass wars:  http://www.utahskiandsnowboard.com/index.php?name=News&file=article&sid=1254


Edited by sibhusky - 7/24/12 at 12:17pm
post #2 of 23

Did you mean to post somthing like this, instead?

 

http://www.utahskiandsnowboard.com/index.php?name=News&file=article&sid=1254

 

 

Somehow I don't think lightning strike deaths are good news for Utah skiers, unless the lightning is specifically targeting people who maintain they're the best skier on the mountain.

post #3 of 23
Thread Starter 

OOPS.  Fixed

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DesiredUsername View Post

Did you mean to post somthing like this, instead?

 

http://www.utahskiandsnowboard.com/index.php?name=News&file=article&sid=1254

 

 

Somehow I don't think lightning strike deaths are good news for Utah skiers, unless the lightning is specifically targeting people who maintain they're the best skier on the mountain.

post #4 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by DesiredUsername View Post

Did you mean to post somthing like this, instead?

 

http://www.utahskiandsnowboard.com/index.php?name=News&file=article&sid=1254

 

 

Somehow I don't think lightning strike deaths are good news for Utah skiers, unless the lightning is specifically targeting people who maintain they're the best skier on the mountain.

 

I think you may be on to something. Now how can we control the lightning....

 

Regardless this seems to be a good sign for Utah skiers. Curious how this effects/meshes with the proposed ski link. 

post #5 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by tylrwnzl View Post

 

I think you may be on to something. Now how can we control the lightning....

 

Regardless this seems to be a good sign for Utah skiers. Curious how this effects/meshes with the proposed ski link. 

SkiLink?  Probably not much effect since Canyons and Solitude are separate entities and, like all the Utah resorts, are generally considered "friendly" competitors who likely see Colorado as the main competition.  The biggie happens after the SkiLink (should it go through) when the seven resorts will attempt to link through the Interconnect.  Should the SkiLink go through, and the Interconnect follow, one could speculate about a Vail Resorts type of ticket pricing even through the resorts are separately owned.  This would get more skier days from locals and drive (well, fly) many additional tourists to the area who could have easy access to seven ski areas with a boatload--16,000+  by my back of the napkin calculation-- of skiable acreage. Any future pricing model is just pure speculation since nothing about that has ever appeared in print and for good reason: The concept of connecting the seven resorts, some of which boarder each other, won't become reality without SkiLink, and SkiLink is not a done deal.  

 

SkiLink and the Interconnect have taken up a lot of space in other threads both here and at TGR. 

post #6 of 23

Why are you two turning this into another crappy SkiLink thread? This is just good news, celebrate it (or at least don't overthink it)!

post #7 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeUT View Post

Why are you two turning this into another crappy SkiLink thread? This is just good news, celebrate it (or at least don't overthink it)!

 

Because its relevant. I dropped out of the Ski Link thread because I realized that A it was going no where and B I don't have the sufficient background knowledge to argue one way or the other.

 

However, if on one hand the resorts have committed to working together and on the other hand get in a price war over season passes those two things aren't going to happen in a vacuum. One will affect the other. I didn't ask to turn this into a debate over the Ski Link, there is a thread for that, I just want to know how the proposal of that affects this. 

post #8 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by tylrwnzl View Post

 

Because its relevant. I dropped out of the Ski Link thread because I realized that A it was going no where and B I don't have the sufficient background knowledge to argue one way or the other.

 

However, if on one hand the resorts have committed to working together and on the other hand get in a price war over season passes those two things aren't going to happen in a vacuum. One will affect the other. I didn't ask to turn this into a debate over the Ski Link, there is a thread for that, I just want to know how the proposal of that affects this. 

 

 

I don't see how. 

 

Snowbasin--the resort offering the deeply discounted passes--is about 50 miles away from the central Wasatch (Park City, and the Cottonwood Canyons)--the area containing resorts proposed to be linked via "ski link". If you want to interpret this as a move to grab passholder  market share in the norhtern wasatch before "ski link" or some other plan comes along to link resorts in the central Wasatch and reduce the importance of geographically isolated resorts like snowbasin in the local ski market, I suppose that might be a view that is at least consistent with the available facts, which so far are minimal. 


Edited by tromano - 7/25/12 at 7:44pm
post #9 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by tylrwnzl View Post

 

Because its relevant. I dropped out of the Ski Link thread because I realized that A it was going no where and B I don't have the sufficient background knowledge to argue one way or the other.

 

However, if on one hand the resorts have committed to working together and on the other hand get in a price war over season passes those two things aren't going to happen in a vacuum. One will affect the other. I didn't ask to turn this into a debate over the Ski Link, there is a thread for that, I just want to know how the proposal of that affects this. 

 

 

I can't imagine how. 

 

Snowbasin--the resort offering the deeply discounted passes--is about 50 miles away from the central Wasatch (Park City, and the Cottonwood Canyons)--the area containing resorts proposed to be linked via "ski link". So no, there is no connection other than they are in same state and are effected by some of the same weather patterns and market forces. 

 

If you want to interpret this as a move to grab local passholder  market share up-front before "ski link" or some other plan comes along to link resorts in the central Wasatch and reduce the importance of geographically isolated resorts like snowbasin in the local ski market, I suppose that might be a view that is at least consistent with the available facts, which so far are minimal. 

 

This is a thread about more than just Snowbasin though. The OP is:

 

 

 

 

I just was wondering outloud how a season pass war would affect any kind of partnerships between the resorts. 

post #10 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by tylrwnzl View Post

 

Because its relevant. I dropped out of the Ski Link thread because I realized that A it was going no where and B I don't have the sufficient background knowledge to argue one way or the other.

 

However, if on one hand the resorts have committed to working together and on the other hand get in a price war over season passes those two things aren't going to happen in a vacuum. One will affect the other. I didn't ask to turn this into a debate over the Ski Link, there is a thread for that, I just want to know how the proposal of that affects this. 


Well to refute your position and answer your question simultaneously: They have nothing to do with each other. The SkiLink is completely independent issue, which is why it has nothing to do with this thread. If the SkiLink, and more importantly Interconnect, goes anywhere, then those resorts will figure out pricing and others will react. For now, the resorts still have to operate business as usual.

post #11 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by tylrwnzl View Post

 

This is a thread about more than just Snowbasin though. The OP is:

 

I just was wondering outloud how a season pass war would affect any kind of partnerships between the resorts. 

 

Um... did you read past the headline? The big news is Snowbasin - one of the only major resorts in N. UT not planning to partner with another resort (unless you count Sun Valley). The rest of the story  is a recap of what else is going on, not much of a war. 

 

"For now, however, Utahans can still expect the status quo. Snowbird's 2012-13 rates are still $999 for an unlimited Tram and chairs pass, or $1,699 when combined with neighboring Alta Ski Area which has yet to confirm its own 2012-13 pass fees. Powder Mountain is asking $700 for an unlimited adult season pass this winter, while Solitude Mountain Resort is maintaining its unique season pass program where purchasers build their own pass by buying individual days of the week. Deer Valley Resort still breaks the bank at $1,810 for a season pass purchased prior to Oct. 31, although locals can score a deal through the resort's Locals Only Pass program of reloadable five- or ten-packs starting at $57 per day for the midweek option.

 

I think this is a great development and have already bought my pass. If it is lucrative for snowbasin then this may provoke a "war" as other vendors seek to retain market share of pass holders. And I am sure that skiers in the SLC area are hoping for a war. But its not here yet. 

 

 

Ski link is still to be determined. It hasn't happened yet. If it does it will be another "game changer" in the season pass market place. 


Edited by tromano - 7/25/12 at 9:07pm
post #12 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

 

Um... did you read past the headline? The big news is Snowbasin - one of the only major resorts in N. UT not planning to partner with another resort (unless you count Sun Valley). The rest of the story  is a recap of what else is going on, not much of a war.

 

Did anyone hear that Snowbasin & Sun Valley (There will be some incredible mountain rest rooms along the way) are going to do an interconnect running right through Beaver Mountain?

 

Do you know how easy it will be to link Snowbasin to the Park City areas & beyond (Including fabulous mountain restrooms)?

 

duck.gif

 

JF

post #13 of 23
My home mountain closes down in early April due to lack of skiers, so this past season I skied late April at Lake Louise on a $400 Spring Pass. So I'm thinking of buying a Snowbasin pass and taking my truck camper to Utah in the spring. Anyone know when Snowbasin's season usually ends and what is their attitude toward RVs?
post #14 of 23

You would be much better off at snowbird that time of year. 

post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

You would be much better off at snowbird that time of year. 

+1

 

Snowbasin usually closes mid-April, whereas Snowbird will stay open well into May or beyond & offers a Spring pass.

post #16 of 23

That's a good deal for the Snowbasin pass, not many blackout dates!  What was the full price pass last year?

 

 

Dano: Snowbird's spring pass is a great deal, for some really good skiing!  But they don't cotton to RV's staying in the canyon?  I'm sure you could find a place to park in the valley or I always see rooms for rent around $300/month, late season. 

 

 

I would also look at the Tahoe resorts and Mammoth?

post #17 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

You would be much better off at snowbird that time of year. 


Yep. Snowbasin typically closes in mid-April. I've seen some great conditions in early April, but with closing looming, April isn't a great time to migrate south.

post #18 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post

That's a good deal for the Snowbasin pass, not many blackout dates!  What was the full price pass last year?

 

 

Dano: Snowbird's spring pass is a great deal, for some really good skiing!  But they don't cotton to RV's staying in the canyon?  I'm sure you could find a place to park in the valley or I always see rooms for rent around $300/month, late season. 

 

 

I would also look at the Tahoe resorts and Mammoth?


I think the price has been $999 for years. Maybe there was an early season price that I don't remember, but $1 K was the standard. They used to have a $500 10-pack that looked enticing, but these season pass prices are even better. With Powder around the corner, that $450 pass is looking pretty good. Heck, you could buy 2 or 3 tickets to Snowbasin on those dates and still come out ahead.

post #19 of 23

The family and I went up to snowbasin to pickup our passes today, one for wife, and one for the young lady. We are stoked to be skiing such a rad mountain everyday this winter. And apparently I can ride the gondi with my bike for the next month+. 

 

So, now that I am moving south, I am wondering - where is the popular touring spot in Ogden valley? 

post #20 of 23
Cutler ridge, below Ben Lomond peak is one of the relatively safer options.



Lots of side country options, but very avy sensitive. Not to be taken lightly.



JF
Edited by 4ster - 9/2/12 at 9:57pm
post #21 of 23

Cutler looks pretty nice. I like mellow powder touring. Awesome!

 

As for the sketchy side country, I might save that for corn season. 

post #22 of 23

Could you imagine if it ever happened? 

 

7 mountains. 1 pass. 15000 acres. Ski link to Solitude. Alta lift to Brighton. A rope drop near Empire at Deer Valley and McConkey's at PC.

 

The LCC/BCC/PC EPIC EPIC Pass! 

Ott+Wedeln.gif

post #23 of 23

Cutler ridge is accessed through North Fork park which also has extensive Nordic trails.  It is a bit of an approach, but has some good un-exposed rolling terrain on the ridge itself.  When conditions are stable there are tons of variations.

 

JF

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