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Mandarin Instructing in US

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Hi, I'm Phil.
 
I come from Taiwan and I got my APSI Apline Lv1 this early year in Niseko. Now, I work for Perisher, Australia, as instructor and I aim to pass Level 2 this season.
 
After this season, I'd like to find a position in north snow as a instructor.
 
Due to visa issue, Japan is easiest choice for me. But if there are any chance, I'd like to instructing in US. 
 
I know it hard to get a sponsor visa. Just wonder there're so many resorts in states, which one prefer oversea instructor more.
 
I speak Mandarin and English. I do skiing and snowboarding. But I don't have any certification for Snowboarding.
 
Do you guys think that is it a big advantage instructing in Mandarin? Or just keep my mind in Japan?
 
It's very difficult to instructing skiing for life, if you are born and raised in Taiwan and only hold ROC's passport. But it's my dream.
 
Any advise is helpful. Thanks.
post #2 of 19

Is Canada off the table entirely?

post #3 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tsung-Min Lai View Post

Hi, I'm Phil.
 
I come from Taiwan and I got my APSI Apline Lv1 this early year in Niseko. Now, I work for Perisher, Australia, as instructor and I aim to pass Level 2 this season.
 
After this season, I'd like to find a position in north snow as a instructor.
 
Due to visa issue, Japan is easiest choice for me. But if there are any chance, I'd like to instructing in US. 
 
I know it hard to get a sponsor visa. Just wonder there're so many resorts in states, which one prefer oversea instructor more.
 
I speak Mandarin and English. I do skiing and snowboarding. But I don't have any certification for Snowboarding.
 
Do you guys think that is it a big advantage instructing in Mandarin? Or just keep my mind in Japan?
 
It's very difficult to instructing skiing for life, if you are born and raised in Taiwan and only hold ROC's passport. But it's my dream.
 
Any advise is helpful. Thanks.

 

July 12, 2012

 

Hi Phil:

 

Let me welcome you to the Barking Bears Forum.  I've been skiing since 1978, and when I first started, for almost the first 15 years, I hardly saw any Chinese (either American born or recent immigrant) on the slopes.  Now one can see many oriental faces, although many of them are Korean or Japanese.  However, there is a significant Chinese presence on the slopes nowadays.  I don't think that it is a "BIG" advantage for being able to teach skiing in Mandarin, since almost all of the Chinese skiers speak English either fluently or "passable".  You might have a "small" advantage especially if you can build up your repertoire of private lessons especially geared towards Chinese skiers.  I would think that another crucial reason coming to North America (US or Canada) is because of the tremendous pool of talented and professional Ski Instructors which you will come in contact with.  It is also quite difficult to "make ends meet" as a Ski Pro here in the US as well.  I wish you well in all your future endeavours wherever that may lead you.

 

Think snow,

 

CP

post #4 of 19
If you can get employment in Japan, I'd plan on that for now.

With the unemployment circumstance in North America, chances of a visa and job are almost nothing.
post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

Is Canada off the table entirely?

I'd like to go Canada as well and I can apply working holiday visa for Canada. So I think it's not a big problem to worry about.

 

But I have no idea how many resort in north america and which one will be my next stop. 

 

I think I prefer which have long run and living on slope or easy access. I'm not interesting about night life. 

 

Any suggestion?

post #6 of 19

Just wonder, how easy can you get an instructor job with your Australian Level 1 certification in north America?

post #7 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scavenger View Post

Just wonder, how easy can you get an instructor job with your Australian Level 1 certification in north America?

Hmmm..... I never think about this. I might go to north America, but not now.

 

I hope that time I can go with my level 2 or higher certification. If it can't be, I may think about other career.

post #8 of 19

How about the Vancouver area? If you want to turn your native language skills into an asset, I understand there is a significant population of affluent Chinese speaking people who have settled there. I am thinking of Whistler Blackcomb which is about as big as it gets here in North America. I should add that I've never actually been there and I have no idea what the issues may be regarding living and working in Canada as an alien so you might want to check those things out.

post #9 of 19
Teaching in mandarin is a much bigger advantage in Japan than the states. Plus you will get paid more in Japan as well. Also it is nigh on impossible for foreign instructors to get visas in the US. Why would you prefer to work in the US?
post #10 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim. View Post

Teaching in mandarin is a much bigger advantage in Japan than the states. Plus you will get paid more in Japan as well. Also it is nigh on impossible for foreign instructors to get visas in the US. Why would you prefer to work in the US?

 

I'd like to see really big mountain and get some training in English. But the main reason is that I'm not sure could I get a sponsor visa in Japan, so I have to find alternate plans to enrich my experience.
 
And I find that it's hard to become a ski instructor just for Taiwanese/Chinese, but I can be a english ski instructor who come form Taiwan. So, for me, english is not avoidable. I have to find a place to learn English, to improve teaching and skiing skill.
 
I just sent my application to NBS, hope see you in Niseko. I think that is best place in Japan to learn English, to improve teaching and skiing skill.
post #11 of 19

I'd look at Whistler for sure. Also you'll hear a good amount of Mandarin on Vancouver's local hills (Cypress, Grouse) in the evening night skiing. I don't know what Mandarin would get you in Niseko unless there are a good number of Chinese now going there for ski vacations. Things have changed much since I was there regularly (pre-Australian invasion), so indeed, maybe there's a need for Mandarin instruction. IMHO, it's always easiest to learn in your native language, but the ideal is a bilingual instructor who can introduce and explain concepts and key vocabulary in both languages.

post #12 of 19

I was thinking what Mark was thinking. I have a "gut feel" that Vancouver local resorts would have the best opportunity for you to get hired, They're not nearly as big as Whistler but you could ski there on your off days.

post #13 of 19

Does anyone like to skii in Salt Lake? i love it!

post #14 of 19

I love Salt Lake too, but you can count the demand for mandarin fluent instructors in Salt Lake on one ski (without the ski).

post #15 of 19

I would think that there may be some very young Chinese kids in the US that haven't learned English yet.  Not a big draw at the resorts, but it could come in handy once in awhile to speak Mandarin.

post #16 of 19

Phil, pm Little Tiger. She instructs in Colorado and somewhere here in Australia. 

 

Other options for you are Vietnam and Korea. 

 

And China. I've heard that some westerners think it'll be huge to acquire some chinese resorts. They're flat and there's a kerzillion aspiring beginners. 

 

A large US chain of resorts was hinting that China was a possible acquisition. Assuming I didn't misinterpret anything, if that chain was smart, they'd want a mandarin speaker in an office role and doubling as a tourism ambassador to lure the affluent chinese to the US destination holiday. 

post #17 of 19

Your best bet for finding resorts in North America that have demand for instruction in Mandarin will be on the west coast. Whistler would probably be number one and either Squaw or Heavenly in the US. 

 

We get some demand for lessons in Chinese (almost always Mandarin rather than Cantonese) in Tahoe. We have a couple instructors capable of teaching in Mandarin, but I know we'd love to have more. 

 

If I were you, I'd get in touch with the Ski School Director at each of the resorts and ask if/how they handle visas for furreners. 

post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by veteran View Post

Phil, pm Little Tiger. She instructs in Colorado and somewhere here in Australia. 

 

Other options for you are Vietnam and Korea. 

 

And China. I've heard that some westerners think it'll be huge to acquire some chinese resorts. They're flat and there's a kerzillion aspiring beginners. 

 

A large US chain of resorts was hinting that China was a possible acquisition. Assuming I didn't misinterpret anything, if that chain was smart, they'd want a mandarin speaker in an office role and doubling as a tourism ambassador to lure the affluent chinese to the US destination holiday. 

 

There's skiing in Vietnam!? 

 

Good luck with the NBS app Phil, I'm sure mandarin will be a plus. 

post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim. View Post

 

There's skiing in Vietnam!? 

 

 

As I recall, my language teacher, who was from North Vietnam, mentioned that there is a high mountain in the North upon which snow occasionally appears and disappears. It didn't sound as if it would provide any skiing. 

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