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Why gear companies continue to design baselayer pants that won`t go over ski boots?

post #1 of 35
Thread Starter 

I keep asking myself this question... I`m having a really hard time finding a good fleece pants that would comfortably go over my ski boots, so far the only good quality I was able to find was REI teton polartec pants.

 

99% of the baselayer pants are too tight and there is no chance they would go over your ski boots, I also have a patagonia capilene that I have to push up to be able to use, no chance to do that with their expedition pants, and the same is true for all other companies icebreaker, mh, or, you name it! So you have to buy those 3/4 that will keep coming up and won`t stay where they should...

 

Now the answer I was really interested to know is, why? Why they keep designing these useless pants and selling as snow sports baselayer pants? I cannot understand that

post #2 of 35

Um, they probably don't make them because there is no demand for them.

 

I can't understand why anyone would want base layer pants to go over their ski boots; it's not the boots that need a thermal layer, and gators keep the snow out of your boots, so there's no functional reason to design what you are looking for.

 

From my experience, you are the only one who is looking for such a thing.

post #3 of 35

I don't know why 3/4 length underlayers would ride up unless you are taller than average?  In which case, just slice the cuff and use the full length ones.  I want the base layer snug around my leg, but not getting wet going over my boot.  I don't need to keep my leg that is under the boot warm, the boot is plenty warm.  The gater goes over the boot and keeps the snow out.  Adding an underlayer UNDER the gator is just a way to SUCK IN moisture to the rest of your base layer. 

post #4 of 35

You can get 3/4 length, or fold the excess back up over your calf.  I've been wearing the Opedix 3/4 length so the problem is solved (for me).  Prior to that I folded them up over my knee braces.  If you don't want either of those options, do what I do for the items that don't fit right...bring them to a seamstress or outdoor retailer that specializes in this type of gear (i.e. Eastern Mountain Sports - www.ems.com).

 

I've had ski jackets, liners, soft shells and show pants altered.

 

Someone else here has posted about just cutting the excess of with scissors.

 

I would also guess the reason to the question (other than VA's answer) is that you then risk snow getting the bottom of the base layer wet and that will then wick up to your leg.  I would also think that the inside of the ski boot warm but the outside quite cold.  Not sure about the latter but wouldn't want to risk it.

 

Typed all that and caught the part of you saying the 3/4 ride up.  I would then recommend something to build up your calf to prevent this.  I've never had this issue but do have thick calves. 

 

 

Another thought is to go old school with:

 

sock suspenders.jpg

 

Just wear them upside down or attach to boots.

 

Or like the Military does with :

shirt stays.gif

 

Just need them a bit shorter but you get the idea.

 

As a caution, don't wear them too tight if you attach them to your shirt as shown above.  If you bend over you'll snap back like a diving board!

post #5 of 35

My longees don't ride up because I pull my socks over the folded up part, this also keeps the socks from falling down. Is there another way that doesn't work as well? th_dunno-1[1].gif

post #6 of 35
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by volantaddict View Post

My longees don't ride up because I pull my socks over the folded up part, this also keeps the socks from falling down. Is there another way that doesn't work as well? th_dunno-1[1].gif

That`s exactly what I do with my patagonia, although they are not 3/4, but since they are lightweight it doesn`t get too bulky! Now I got new shell pants with no insulation at all, and I was looking for some fleece pants, or polartec baselayer to use under the shell. That`s why I was looking for something to go over the boots.

 

Get me worried now about the comments on getting snow on them or humid when using over the boots :-( 

post #7 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by mfa81 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by volantaddict View Post

My longees don't ride up because I pull my socks over the folded up part, this also keeps the socks from falling down. Is there another way that doesn't work as well? th_dunno-1[1].gif

That`s exactly what I do with my patagonia, although they are not 3/4, but since they are lightweight it doesn`t get too bulky! Now I got new shell pants with no insulation at all, and I was looking for some fleece pants, or polartec baselayer to use under the shell. That`s why I was looking for something to go over the boots.

 

Get me worried now about the comments on getting snow on them or humid when using over the boots :-( 

I have some kind of REI Polartec things that were very heavy weight and would DEFINITELY go over the boot.  I got them for exactly what you are describing, for use under shell pants, but then lost the weight that was necessitating this arrangement and never used them that way.  They no longer list them, but the style was more "sweatpants" than long underwear and they were made of Polartec 200 or something really heavy.  

post #8 of 35
There is no way a base layer that is designed to fit your leg will also fit over a boot and all base layers by definition are designed to fit you leg. That is why they are described as base layers. You might find some fleece or fleece-lined pants with elastic cuffs that will stretch over your boots.
post #9 of 35

I have no problems with either full length or 3/4 length base layer pants. I think the design of all the models I have used (and it is diverse mix) is perfect and functioning as intended in each case. 

 

Why do you want the pants over your boots? 

post #10 of 35

If the OP is looking to replace insulated pants and base layer with a shell plus a heavy base (fleece or sweat pants) layer, then I would suggest doing what I wear: Two light weight base layers underneath a Gortex shell. In really cold weather the first base layer becomes medium weight and in really warm weather I go with one less base layer.

post #11 of 35
Thread Starter 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

I have some kind of REI Polartec things that were very heavy weight and would DEFINITELY go over the boot.  I got them for exactly what you are describing, for use under shell pants, but then lost the weight that was necessitating this arrangement and never used them that way.  They no longer list them, but the style was more "sweatpants" than long underwear and they were made of Polartec 200 or something really heavy.  

REI Polartec pants was the best I`ve found so far.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

I have no problems with either full length or 3/4 length base layer pants. I think the design of all the models I have used (and it is diverse mix) is perfect and functioning as intended in each case. 

 

Why do you want the pants over your boots? 

I`ve tried before to stuck stuff inside my boots but didn`t feel comfortable I`ve tried over and inside the socks but no chance!

Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post

If the OP is looking to replace insulated pants and base layer with a shell plus a heavy base (fleece or sweat pants) layer, then I would suggest doing what I wear: Two light weight base layers underneath a Gortex shell. In really cold weather the first base layer becomes medium weight and in really warm weather I go with one less base layer.

Yep, that`s exactly what I`m looking for. Two baselayes seems like a good idea. I will try something like that!

post #12 of 35
post #13 of 35

I'm here to post in this very important long john threadrolleyes.gif

 

Just don't buckle your top boot buckles so tight and the long john cuff bumps won't bother you at allbiggrin.gif

post #14 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by mfa81 View Post So you have to buy those 3/4 that will keep coming up and won`t stay where they should...

 

 

Heel.jpg

post #15 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

 

 

Heel.jpg

 

My calves are so big my boot fitter said "Those aren't calves, they're cows".

post #16 of 35

 I'm not quite in the milch cow camp at only 19"

Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post

 

My calves are so big my boot fitter said "Those aren't calves, they're cows".

post #17 of 35
Was reading this post yesterday, and came across these today while looking for some deals on ski gear. OP, check this out. It might be just what you are looking for.

Cheers

http://www.backcountry.com/arcteryx-phase-sv-boot-cut-bottom-mens
post #18 of 35

I don't know where you live but unless it is somewhere that gets brutally cold, like northern Canada or Alaska, you're worrying about nothing.  It can get pretty cold here in Montana and i wear either Patagonia Powder Bowl or Outdoor Research Tremor pants, neither of which has insulation.  If the day is predicted to be really cold, I wear CW-X 3/4 Insulator tights, otherwise I wear either Capilene 2 or Merino 2 under the shell pants and my legs have never been cold. If a really warm day(above 30F) is predicted I might even wear my silkweight Capilene.  With the Capilene and Merino, I pull them up just below my knee and pull my socks on so that the top of the socks is over the bottom of the underwear by maybe 1-2 inches.  I have no trouble with any of it falling down and I don't have giant calves.

 

I just noticed you live in Boise, can't be any colder there than it is here.  Don't waste money on something until you know if you really need it.

post #19 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post

If the OP is looking to replace insulated pants and base layer with a shell plus a heavy base (fleece or sweat pants) layer, then I would suggest doing what I wear: Two light weight base layers underneath a Gortex shell. In really cold weather the first base layer becomes medium weight and in really warm weather I go with one less base layer.

 

 

The OP seems to be making it more complicated than it is.  I wear shell pants with a medium weight fleece, and the legs of the fleece push up and sit on top of my boots. That works for most of the season and if it's brutally cold I'll add a thin base layer, which also sits near the top of my boot cuff.  Is that a problem somehow?

post #20 of 35
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Abox View Post

 

 

The OP seems to be making it more complicated than it is.  I wear shell pants with a medium weight fleece, and the legs of the fleece push up and sit on top of my boots. That works for most of the season and if it's brutally cold I'll add a thin base layer, which also sits near the top of my boot cuff.  Is that a problem somehow?

Probably true, I will try pull up a fleece pants and see how it works! Looks like most of the people does that and I thought it wouldn`t be a good idea. I recently got new pants (MH Bokta) which has no insulation at all and I thought I would need warmer baselayer than my capilene.

 

Thanks all for the feedback, it really looks  like it`s no big deal! :-)

post #21 of 35

You might have an interest in the SMARTY line from 686 - the detachable fleece liner is fitted to the shell pant instead of to the leg.
 

post #22 of 35

686 smarty pants BOOYAH !!

3 SEASONS and they rock ,Just slide them on and go

post #23 of 35

I prefer this look:

 

80f8fe6d_P82-18-300-b.jpeg

post #24 of 35

Okay, I've been skiing a long time. I have tried LOTS of base layers - all the way back to the cotton waffle-knit long johns my mom used to order from Sears, Roebuck and pick up at the catalog store.

 

None of them remotely compares to these, as far as I'm concerned, in every regard. Search over. Just fold them up at the cuff - they're very stretchy - and pull the top of your sock over, like several others have said. These have never ridden up OR down on me. If it's super cold - 10 deg. F or below - I'll add another layer between these and outer pants. If it's so warm out that even an uninsulated shell pant is too hot over them, I just pull on a pair of shorts instead of the shell pants.

post #25 of 35

 Another convert to Polar Stretch, woohoo  !icon14.gif

post #26 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post

I don't know where you live but unless it is somewhere that gets brutally cold, like northern Canada or Alaska, you're worrying about nothing.  It can get pretty cold here in Montana and i wear either Patagonia Powder Bowl or Outdoor Research Tremor pants, neither of which has insulation.  If the day is predicted to be really cold, I wear CW-X 3/4 Insulator tights, otherwise I wear either Capilene 2 or Merino 2 under the shell pants and my legs have never been cold. If a really warm day(above 30F) is predicted I might even wear my silkweight Capilene.  With the Capilene and Merino, I pull them up just below my knee and pull my socks on so that the top of the socks is over the bottom of the underwear by maybe 1-2 inches.  I have no trouble with any of it falling down and I don't have giant calves.

 

I just noticed you live in Boise, can't be any colder there than it is here.  Don't waste money on something until you know if you really need it.

This is what I was thinking.  I grew up skiing in MT with shell pants and never needed more than a medium weight base layer under them.  I just push them down to the top of my boots and they never ride up and there isn't much "bunch." 

post #27 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtskibum16 View Post

This is what I was thinking.  I grew up skiing in MT with shell pants and never needed more than a medium weight base layer under them.  I just push them down to the top of my boots and they never ride up and there isn't much "bunch." 

 

The bunching of such an arrangement is rather dependent on calf size.

post #28 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtskibum16 View Post

This is what I was thinking.  I grew up skiing in MT with shell pants and never needed more than a medium weight base layer under them.  I just push them down to the top of my boots and they never ride up and there isn't much "bunch." 

The bunching of such an arrangement is rather dependent on calf size.

Yes, it had occurred to me that this person must have skinny shanks.
post #29 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtskibum16 View Post

This is what I was thinking.  I grew up skiing in MT with shell pants and never needed more than a medium weight base layer under them.  I just push them down to the top of my boots and they never ride up and there isn't much "bunch." 

 

I think you're the second Montanan to say something like this. There is more to climate and dressing for it than plain temperature. I've had a few ski trips out West, and one in the summer. For me, at least, one of the stark differences between West and East is how much easier it is to regulate body temperature in the West. You're cold? Step into the sun. You're hot? Step into the shade. Presumably it's the dry air, which helps with evaporation (for cooling and also for staying dry) and is also a poorer conductor of heat (better insulator). Unfortunately it does not work like that in the East, where I often find myself wearing more clothes at 30F than I would on a sunny 15F day in Colorado or Utah. Then there is body type. I'm skinny and always have trouble staying warm unless I'm really moving vigorously. I have friends that are virtually never cold. My point is simply that just because one clothing system works for you and is warm enough for you, it doesn't mean that it will work for the next guy.

post #30 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post

If the OP is looking to replace insulated pants and base layer with a shell plus a heavy base (fleece or sweat pants) layer, then I would suggest doing what I wear: Two light weight base layers underneath a Gortex shell. In really cold weather the first base layer becomes medium weight and in really warm weather I go with one less base layer.

That's exactly what I do and it works like a charm.  I use a smartwool base layer plus a light polartec fleece pant.  I just bunch the pant up above the boot. Since it is light, this is works well. On hot days, I skip the woolies. On really cold days, I go for heavier fleece.  If you put fleece over the boot, it will just mess with any devices your pants have to keep snow out anyway.

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