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How common are ski pole stabbing injuries? - Page 2

post #31 of 56
My father took out my brother's tonsils with a ski pole. Was using the pole to tow the little on a traverse, and pushed back while the little one was trying to eat some snow off of the pole or something (he didn't look so he didn't know what the little one was doing). Kid screams, my dad turns around there is a lot of blood...of course he feared the worst (that he was going to lose his son) and rushes him down to the doctor, and the doctor comes out and says "well, you did a nice clean job of removing half the tonsils. I'll just take the other half out and finish the job".

Needless to say, he never towed kis around with the pointy end of the pole after that.
post #32 of 56

^^^ Thanks for that.  I will make sure if I ever tow anyone to grab the pointy end and give them the handle.

post #33 of 56

I've towed my kid that way a couple times and had the that "could that actually happen" thought in the back if my mind while doing it.  Skiers often tow their snowboarder friends across the flats that way.  No doubt it does happen sometimes, but probably a pretty rare occurrence.  Side note about sports gear and eye injuries.  I have a pet peeve about not letting my kids fish without some kind of eye protection (sun glasses) because my wife's cousin took a barbed hook to the eye many many years ago.  I had to have the ER remove a hook from my upper arm thanks to an errant cast from my 5 year old daughter 4 years ago so I do believe that is something that "could actually happen". 

 

For whatever reason I'm still more wary of fish hooks than pole tips but better safe than sorry.  I'm thinking that most pole tip injuries probably happen around the corrals to beginner lifts and the magic carpets where noobs are pecking and poking away trying to get around not all that aware enough of others immediately behind them or next to them. 

post #34 of 56

I asked my wife who is an emerge nurse in a ski town.  She would only see the more serious injuries.  Her answer is "not common"


Edited by canadianskier - 10/13/13 at 10:50am
post #35 of 56

One thing that gives me the shakes, is skiers missing a basket on the ski pole. While I agree that injuries are likely rare, this is one of those things that Murphy will likely intervene and ensure that a pole stabbing will occur.  What's worrisome is that 9 time out of 10 those skiers are at the highest risk of causing an injury (just good enough to think they are great, not good enough to know better).

 

For the cost of a basket, get it fixed.  I'd rather a have a hole a couple of inches deep, versus a through and through.

post #36 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 

I've towed my kid that way a couple times and had the that "could that actually happen" thought in the back if my mind while doing it.  Skiers often tow their snowboarder friends across the flats that way.  No doubt it does happen sometimes, but probably a pretty rare occurrence.  Side note about sports gear and eye injuries.  I have a pet peeve about not letting my kids fish without some kind of eye protection (sun glasses) because my wife's cousin took a barbed hook to the eye many many years ago. 

 

 

Tangent to the tangent - my father took a hook in the nose while on a fishing boat, my uncle promptly removed it without washing his hands.    Three days later when they got the boat in the infection was at his optic nerve and within mm of his brain. 

 

So, everyone, please remember to wash the bait off your hands before you remove the ski pole, mmmkay?


Edited by cantunamunch - 10/15/13 at 7:47am
post #37 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschoolskier View Post

One thing that gives me the shakes, is skiers missing a basket on the ski pole. While I agree that injuries are likely rare, this is one of those things that Murphy will likely intervene and ensure that a pole stabbing will occur.  What's worrisome is that 9 time out of 10 those skiers are at the highest risk of causing an injury (just good enough to think they are great, not good enough to know better).

For the cost of a basket, get it fixed.  I'd rather a have a hole a couple of inches deep, versus a through and through.

My basket fell off last season, promptly went in, got a non-matching one, $3. It is a tad distracting to have two different colors, but with me it's all about the cost. Could clearly go now and buy a set, but the new one works.
post #38 of 56

For some reason I seem to inflict more of them when snowboarders are around.

post #39 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot View Post
 

For some reason I seem to inflict more of them when snowboarders are around.

:duel:

post #40 of 56
The "angry porcupine" is a valid defense tactic. Sometimes, I even use a modified form of it in the lift line to keep people off the back of my skis.
post #41 of 56

I saw this more east than I do west. Coming to a trail intersection where skiers are congregating, it was not uncommon to see a skier stick out a pole sideways in a threatening manner to stab if you got close. 

post #42 of 56

The US needs a ski pole registry and a two week waiting period before being able to buy them:)

post #43 of 56

I want  assault poles with paratrooper stocks and extra booze capacity mags. 

post #44 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 

I want  assault poles with paratrooper stocks and extra booze capacity mags.

Are you with the NPA?

post #45 of 56

I am a responsible pole owner.

post #46 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by sofort99 View Post

The "angry porcupine" is a valid defense tactic. Sometimes, I even use a modified form of it in the lift line to keep people off the back of my skis.

 

Yikes... valid? Really? :nono:

post #47 of 56

Reminder:  Grivel condors are still available.    Ask for them by name. 

post #48 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 

Reminder:  Grivel condors are still available.    Ask for them by name. 

With poles like that so would I, and  we haven't even started into self inflicted injures?  Must be good for both the porcupine and cross block techniques.

 

What poles certification do you need to have to ski with one of those?

BTW how often do you sharped the upper pick?  :dunno:D:beercheer:

 

 

One final question.....what do the ski patrollers say to you?

 

Cheers,

post #49 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skierish View Post
 

I don't remember exactly when it was, but a few years ago I read an article about something similar.  Three friends were backcountry skiing somewhere in what I seem to recall was Utah.  One of them hit a buried rut or some other obstruction and took what appeared to be an inconsequential spill.  Sadly, one of his ski poles punctured his thigh and sliced through his femoral artery.  He bled out and died before his two friends could get him help.  It's been awhile, and my memory of it is a little fuzzy, but I think the gist of the article was something about how even the most freakish and unlikely of accidents can prove tragic to even the most accomplished of skiers.

 

I don't know how common such injuries might be, but it's the primary reason I don't use the straps on my ski poles.  I just don't want to be impaled by a ski pole flailing around me in a fall, or more likely, causing a fall by hooking a tree limb or brush.  I prefer to just hike back to retrieve it on the very few occasions when that's even proven necessary.

 

Like BP said that happened in Teton Pass.  It was the year that I took the OEC course and became a ski patroller, sometime around 2000.  In fact one of the people in the group was in my OEC class.  As I remember it, the skier fell and broke their pole which then punctured his thigh.  He was the last skier in the group and everyone else was below him.  By the time his buddies figured out something was wrong and broke trail up to him in the deep powder he had bled out.  I think the run was either the first or second turn gully coming off of Glory.  I don't remember if the pole was carbon or aluminum.  I think it was aluminum.

 

This is the only serious pole incident I can think of in my decades of skiing experience.  The group was comprised of strong skiers and at least one of them had strong first aid training having just finished the OEC course several weeks earlier.  Sometimes it IS better to be lucky than good, or at least not unlucky.

post #50 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschoolskier View Post
 

With poles like that so would I, and  we haven't even started into self inflicted injures?  Must be good for both the porcupine and cross block techniques.

 

 

Yeh, well, I have a story about that.   Involving the BD version of that pole, my French sometime-climbing-buddy, his ex-girlfriend, and Mt. Washington.   That episode cost me a nice pair of Moonstone 3-Gore pants, too. 


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschoolskier View Post
 

 

 

One final question.....what do the ski patrollers say to you?

 

 

 

"You know, we're having an open house..."   :D

 

post #51 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by tetonpwdrjunkie View Post
 

 

Like BP said that happened in Teton Pass.  It was the year that I took the OEC course and became a ski patroller, sometime around 2000.  In fact one of the people in the group was in my OEC class.  As I remember it, the skier fell and broke their pole which then punctured his thigh.  He was the last skier in the group and everyone else was below him.  By the time his buddies figured out something was wrong and broke trail up to him in the deep powder he had bled out.  I think the run was either the first or second turn gully coming off of Glory.  I don't remember if the pole was carbon or aluminum.  I think it was aluminum.

 

This is the only serious pole incident I can think of in my decades of skiing experience.  The group was comprised of strong skiers and at least one of them had strong first aid training having just finished the OEC course several weeks earlier.  Sometimes it IS better to be lucky than good, or at least not unlucky.

 

I think I recall reading that it was Carbon.

post #52 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 

I am a responsible pole owner.


My only incident occurred on a run out.  I was going fast but it was flat and smooth and so not apparently worthy of my attention.  I started messing with gloves, or longjohns or something when one pole stuck into the passing terrain, got caught between my legs against a ski and instantly snapped.  One of the pieces hit my boot, going through my ski pants but because of the boot it simply rebounded harmlessly.  My utter negligence could have cost me an artery or, worse, Johnny.

 

This proves my contention perhaps obvious from my avatar which is poles don't kill people, people do.

post #53 of 56

Getting off topic, I got a black eye once from the non-pointy end of the pole.  I don't think I've skied in sunglasses since.  And when buying poles, I make sure the end of the grip is big enough that it won't inflict serious damage.

post #54 of 56

I fell on a pole once. It hurt.:o

post #55 of 56
Quote:
Originally Posted by tball View Post
 

Getting off topic, I got a black eye once from the non-pointy end of the pole.  I don't think I've skied in sunglasses since.  And when buying poles, I make sure the end of the grip is big enough that it won't inflict serious damage.

 

I did that to.  I punched myself when the pole came back at me when I was just beginning to get confident skiing in trees and bumps.  The impact broke my sunglasses right at the bridge and gave me two black eyes.

post #56 of 56

Not an on-hill incident, but when I was a teenager, I got a fat lip when my brother tried to throw a ski pole back up to the balcony of our chalet. Pointy end first. In the dark. In hindsight, I'm probably lucky it was just a fat lip.

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