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Tour de France Wine List

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 

When we can't be there, we at least try to drink the local wine:

 

2012 Tour de France Wine List

 

Stages 1-4: The Tour starts in Belgium and remains inexplicably close for four days. There is no local wine for these days we’ll just have to drink beer.

 

Stage 5 July 5:  The tour finally heads south in goes through the town of Reims.  Obviously we will have to have a good bottle of Reims champagne.

 

Stage 6 July 6:  This stage starts in the town of Epernay.  This day will give us a good chance to compare champagne of Reims and Epernay.

 

Stage 7 July 7: The tour continues through the Alsace.  We always have a Oregon vs. Alsace Pinot Gris or Riesling taste contest.

 

Stage 8 July 8: We head into Switzerland and finish near the town of Neuchatel, which has a fabulous wine festival.  If we can find a bottle of Neuchatel we will have that but Swiss wines are difficult to find and really, for what you get, quite overpriced.

 

Stage 9 July 9 The tour has a time-trial very close to the town of Beaune, a wonderful Burgundy town.   We were lucky enough to meet Chris Newman, an American who owns a Grand Cru Domain in town. We will have Cote de Beaune Pinot Noir, Domaine Newman if we can find one, and perhaps compare it to an Oregon Pinot.

 

July 10: Rest day in Macon.  The Macon appellation the largest producer of white Burgundies. We have a

 2010 Domaine Jean Pierre Seve Macon-Solutre in the cellar just waiting for this day.

 

 Stage 11 July 12: The race heads into the Alps into the Savoie region.  Our standard wine of this area is an Apremont, a wine Kermit Lynch compares to drinking from a mountain stream. The wine is made from the Jacquere grape, grown on the rubbly land left from a landslide which buried numerous small villages in 1248.  The French weren’t about to let this tragedy go to waste, and recognized good vineyard potential, planting grapes over all of the demolished villages.

 

Stage 12 July 13th the race will go very close to Croze Hermitage area.  Again, no question what to drink this day.

 

Stage 13 July 14th We continue through wonderful vineyards with the race going very close to the town of of Chateauneuf du Pape.  I love that wine, but mostly buy wines from the nearby areas of Gigondas, and Vacqueyras, where one can find a similar wine at a better price.   They also ride right through the appellation of Costieres de Nîmes, the finest wines of the Languedoc region.  I think we’ll of those instead of the Chateauneuf de Pape.

 

Stage 14 July 15th Today’s stage starts in the town of Limoux where of the champagne process was invented.  We have a Blanquette de Limoux and the cellar, but we will try to find a far superior Crémant de Limoux for the day.  These bubblies are a wonderful alternative to expensive French champagne.

 

Stage 15 July 16:  The ride to Pau does not cross any significant wine regions but it does go through the Armagnac region. Armagnac is a brandy similar to Cognac except you can find a much better brandy for the money. We learned at the Armagnac museum in the town of Condom that it is only aged in oak barrels cut from trees harvested during the new moon of January or February.

 

Stage 16 July 18: the race heads towards the Pyrénées and crosses the Jurancon appellation. This is a rather obscure wine made from the Manseng grape.  There are several similar wines available which would be a fine substitute, such as Colombelle.  Colombelle is one of the holy grail white wines (cheap enough to cook with and good enough to drink a bit of).  It’s a Vin du Pays Gasconne made from Manseng grapes.

 

Stage 17 July 19: The riders run around the Pyrénées all day and encounter no wine of interest.

 

Stage 18 July 20: the race will go through the town of Cahors.  Cahors is famous for its dark red wine, and a bottle of Cahors with that towns’ fortified bridge on the label can be found in most stores. The bridge has a smiling devil, laughing at the builder who had to make a deal with the devil to finish the bridge.

 

Stage 19 July 20: first The tour heads north and crosses the Loire In the region of Touraine and Vouvray . We’ll have a nice Touraine Savignon for the night.

 

Stages 21 in 22 are near Paris.  There is no local wine but you can find any wine in Paris so tonight have the French wine of your choice.

post #2 of 21

That's doing the TDF in style....... unfortunately the live broadcast finishes here around 2:30 am so TDF is generally 3 weeks of sleep depravation and somehow I don't think tasting my way through the regions will help staying awake.  Though next year's plan is to follow le Tour through France and of course try plenty of the local product in situe........

post #3 of 21

Champagne is good for anywhere anytime.

post #4 of 21

One thing I regret about our trip was not being able to bring back more French Wine, especially any from Savoie and other obscure regions.  You can find the occasional bottle of Apremont here, but that is about it.

 

 I do think I will follow your lead and your wine recommendations for the next three weeks.  My liver may never be the same.

post #5 of 21

Not wine related, but here is a picture of my wife with the swag she got on the climb to the citadel in Namur today.IMG_0587.jpg

post #6 of 21

THIS IS GREAT! 

post #7 of 21
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roadrash View Post

Not wine related, but here is a picture of my wife with the swag she got on the climb to the citadel in Namur today.IMG_0587.jpg

 

 

walls 018.jpg

post #8 of 21

When in doubt drink Gammy Beaujolais, a Frenchman would.

post #9 of 21

Thanks.  This is how I'd probably roll over there..

 

post #10 of 21

My daughter took this shot of Fabi approaching the summit at Namur,288300_10151072675177792_150023089_o.jpg

post #11 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roadrash View Post

My daughter took this shot of Fabi approaching the summit at Namur,

Nice pic. Wasn't as sunny today. Did she get any snaps of the crash at the end? There were a few spills 2 riders got knocked out. 

post #12 of 21

No pics of the crash, but she picked up this old guy after the end of today stage in Boulogne-sur-Mer .

555842_10151074888097792_98927314_n.jpg

post #13 of 21

Well done the lass!

post #14 of 21

Weren't those banned some time ago?   Or did they just change the material?

Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post

 

 

walls 018.jpg

post #15 of 21
Thread Starter 

Mine is the original Hushovld- slicing cardboard.  I took that when we were talking about what cut his arm.  The new ones have an idiot proof edge.

post #16 of 21

Red or Rose or both on the 14th?

 

(and while I do like Armagnac, surely you can find something good for the wine list on the 15th?  smile.gif  )

post #17 of 21
Thread Starter 

Those wines for the 14th are most certainly red. The Tour is skipping the Rose' regions this year.  I did find a white Costiere de Nimes, so I'll open thet for the white, and open a Chateauneuf du Pape red.

 

The right wine for the Armagnac day would be a Vin du Pays du  Gasconne, and you can see why they distill it into brandy!

 

Got to say, as much as I like Oregon Pinots, the real Bourgogne last night was quite good.

post #18 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by newfydog View Post

When we can't be there, we at least try to drink the local wine:

 

2012 Tour de France Wine List

 

Stages 1-4: The Tour starts in Belgium and remains inexplicably close for four days. There is no local wine for these days we’ll just have to drink beer.

 

Stage 5 July 5:  The tour finally heads south in goes through the town of Reims.  Obviously we will have to have a good bottle of Reims champagne.

 

Stage 6 July 6:  This stage starts in the town of Epernay.  This day will give us a good chance to compare champagne of Reims and Epernay.

 

Stage 7 July 7: The tour continues through the Alsace.  We always have a Oregon vs. Alsace Pinot Gris or Riesling taste contest.

 

Stage 8 July 8: We head into Switzerland and finish near the town of Neuchatel, which has a fabulous wine festival.  If we can find a bottle of Neuchatel we will have that but Swiss wines are difficult to find and really, for what you get, quite overpriced.

 

Stage 9 July 9 The tour has a time-trial very close to the town of Beaune, a wonderful Burgundy town.   We were lucky enough to meet Chris Newman, an American who owns a Grand Cru Domain in town. We will have Cote de Beaune Pinot Noir, Domaine Newman if we can find one, and perhaps compare it to an Oregon Pinot.

 

July 10: Rest day in Macon.  The Macon appellation the largest producer of white Burgundies. We have a

 2010 Domaine Jean Pierre Seve Macon-Solutre in the cellar just waiting for this day.

 

 Stage 11 July 12: The race heads into the Alps into the Savoie region.  Our standard wine of this area is an Apremont, a wine Kermit Lynch compares to drinking from a mountain stream. The wine is made from the Jacquere grape, grown on the rubbly land left from a landslide which buried numerous small villages in 1248.  The French weren’t about to let this tragedy go to waste, and recognized good vineyard potential, planting grapes over all of the demolished villages.

 

Stage 12 July 13th the race will go very close to Croze Hermitage area.  Again, no question what to drink this day.

 

Stage 13 July 14th We continue through wonderful vineyards with the race going very close to the town of of Chateauneuf du Pape.  I love that wine, but mostly buy wines from the nearby areas of Gigondas, and Vacqueyras, where one can find a similar wine at a better price.   They also ride right through the appellation of Costieres de Nîmes, the finest wines of the Languedoc region.  I think we’ll of those instead of the Chateauneuf de Pape.

 

Stage 14 July 15th Today’s stage starts in the town of Limoux where of the champagne process was invented.  We have a Blanquette de Limoux and the cellar, but we will try to find a far superior Crémant de Limoux for the day.  These bubblies are a wonderful alternative to expensive French champagne.

 

Stage 15 July 16:  The ride to Pau does not cross any significant wine regions but it does go through the Armagnac region. Armagnac is a brandy similar to Cognac except you can find a much better brandy for the money. We learned at the Armagnac museum in the town of Condom that it is only aged in oak barrels cut from trees harvested during the new moon of January or February.

 

Stage 16 July 18: the race heads towards the Pyrénées and crosses the Jurancon appellation. This is a rather obscure wine made from the Manseng grape.  There are several similar wines available which would be a fine substitute, such as Colombelle.  Colombelle is one of the holy grail white wines (cheap enough to cook with and good enough to drink a bit of).  It’s a Vin du Pays Gasconne made from Manseng grapes.

 

Stage 17 July 19: The riders run around the Pyrénées all day and encounter no wine of interest.

 

Stage 18 July 20: the race will go through the town of Cahors.  Cahors is famous for its dark red wine, and a bottle of Cahors with that towns’ fortified bridge on the label can be found in most stores. The bridge has a smiling devil, laughing at the builder who had to make a deal with the devil to finish the bridge.

 

Stage 19 July 20: first The tour heads north and crosses the Loire In the region of Touraine and Vouvray . We’ll have a nice Touraine Savignon for the night.

 

Stages 21 in 22 are near Paris.  There is no local wine but you can find any wine in Paris so tonight have the French wine of your choice.

What's in your Cellar this year NewfyDog? 

post #19 of 21
Can't believe I hadn't seen this before. Gonna be hard to top the Weinbach Cuvee Ste Catherine riesling from last weekend, but will have to think about this. I know I have squat from La Corse.
post #20 of 21
Would Sardinia be close enough?
post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by qcanoe View Post

Would Sardinia be close enough?

 

 

No!    On any other TdF,  sure, but  this  TdF needs to be 100% french.

 

 

(typed as I proceed to pull a Nelson)

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