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REALLY Morbid Question

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

We were at a party last night and several people were asking how my toe surgery was going.  I said it was fine and I can't wait to get out of the walking boot and off the crutch.

 

The topic then came up of how much hardware I have now.  I hadn't thought about it until then, but counting the toe thing I just had plus the ACL reconstruction twenty yeas ago, I now have a total of eleven screws and a fair-sized plate inside me.  We then started looking around and realized how many people in the room have metal (or ceramic) pins, plates, rods, joints, implants, etc.  

 

So THAT led someone to ask what happens to that stuff when you die and get cremated????

 

Nobody in the room knew.  

 

Does the metal stuff melt?  Does it stay intact?  Are we Terminators in that sense?

 

If it melts or stays intact, do they keep that stuff in with your ashes or do they dispose of it?

 

I'm sure I could Google it, but I just wondered if any of you know the answer. 

post #2 of 7

From this:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cremation

 

Not all that remains is bone. There may be melted metal lumps from missed jewellery; casket furniture; dental fillings; and surgical implants, such as hip replacements. Large items such as titanium hip replacements (which tarnish but do not melt) or casket hinges are usually removed before processing, as they may damage the processor. (If they are missed at first, they must ultimately be removed before processing is complete, as items such as titanium joint replacements are far too durable to be ground). Implants may be returned to the family, but are more commonly sold as ferrous/non-ferrous scrap metal. After the remains are processed, smaller bits of metal such as tooth fillings, and rings (commonly known as gleanings) are sieved out and may be later interred in common, consecrated ground in a remote area of the cemetery. They may also be sold as precious metal scrap.

 

 

Icky....

 

Even ickier...

 

http://grave-matters.blogspot.com/2008/12/metal-implants-find-second-life-via.html

post #3 of 7

Another possible answer, by the ultimate philosopher Hobbes:

 

Pittsburgh.png

post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoldMember View Post

From this:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cremation

 

Not all that remains is bone. There may be melted metal lumps from missed jewellery; casket furniture; dental fillings; and surgical implants, such as hip replacements. Large items such as titanium hip replacements (which tarnish but do not melt) or casket hinges are usually removed before processing, as they may damage the processor. (If they are missed at first, they must ultimately be removed before processing is complete, as items such as titanium joint replacements are far too durable to be ground). Implants may be returned to the family, but are more commonly sold as ferrous/non-ferrous scrap metal. After the remains are processed, smaller bits of metal such as tooth fillings, and rings (commonly known as gleanings) are sieved out and may be later interred in common, consecrated ground in a remote area of the cemetery. They may also be sold as precious metal scrap.

 

 

Icky....

 

Even ickier...

 

http://grave-matters.blogspot.com/2008/12/metal-implants-find-second-life-via.html

 

Icky for sure.

 

I guess I really don't want to know how they go about the part "(If they are missed at first, they must ultimately be removed before processing is complete, as items such as titanium joint replacements are far too durable to be ground)."

 

EEEWW!

post #5 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post

 

Icky for sure.

 

I guess I really don't want to know how they go about the part "(If they are missed at first, they must ultimately be removed before processing is complete, as items such as titanium joint replacements are far too durable to be ground)."

 

EEEWW!

Isnt' there a TV show that features Icky jobs? This one would be a doozy. how'd ya like to be the guy who has to go into the "partially processed" bin to remove hinges and screws!

post #6 of 7
Most likely it's a screening process. Kind of like sifting the maggots out of the flour.
post #7 of 7

sold at fall ski  & body parts sales/ fundraisers and re-used in (by) other skiers - 

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