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Where exactly snow tires are required by law in Utah - Page 2

post #31 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

 

There's actually four tiers:

 

Summer                    - sucks in snow, sucks in low temps even with new tread, possibly  also suck in rain

All Season (M+S)      - OK-ish in low temps , suck in snow unless tread is *brand* new, then they just barely get by, decent in rain.

Mountain Symbol     - better in low temps,  better in snow

Dedicated Snows      -  best of the lot.


All Season is OK with AWD/4wd.  I agree that they suck after a certain wear point well before they would need replacing for non snow travel.  My experience has been that they are usually fine for the first 10K miles, some up to about 25K miles.  It just depends on the brand and model.  If you get a rental with over 10K miles on the tires you might be in for a sketchy ride.

post #32 of 40
Thread Starter 

I will for sure get some real snow tire and use during the winter. Overall your tires both will last long since you are using two sets of tires and considering places like les schwab will swap, rotate, rebalancing  your tires before and after the snow season. The only thing you really have to afford is the tire set, it`s not a penny purchase but you will wait longer before replacing tires since you now have two sets.

 

I will be looking for something early this winter and will put them on as soon as snow starts to fall...

post #33 of 40

This thread has got me thinking, & eventually I will probably start a new thread.

 

I have always lived in the mountains & traveled in snow country.  In 1980 I owned a 4WD Subaru hatchback & ran four real snow tires on it.  That car was a tank & never let me down even in a few huge Tahoe snow years.  Since 1990 I have owned 2 Subaru AWD Legacy's & and 2 Impreza WRX's.  On these vehicles I have always run All Season M+S tires & never had a real problem, although I seem to burn through tires really quickly.  Some have been better in the snow than others, & some have been better performance on dry pavement.  None, (like All Mountain Skis) have been the perfect combination.

 

To my surprise, my new 1.5 month old 2012 WRX came with summer tires.  My first thought was to get separate rims & mount some dedicated snows for the winter, & just switch in the summer.  Now I am questioning that idea, as this is high performance car & I am a bit concerned about not having speed rated tires.  So, what to do?  Do I just put All Seasons on my present rims & switch back in the summer till I wear the summer tires out?  Do I get another set of rims & try the Mountain symbol tires which would probably be a traction improvement over All Seasons & still give me decent performance?  Where I live in UT now is not nearly as severe as it was for the many years I lived in Tahoe & had to deal with chain control areas frequently.  I do live on a steep hill now, which gets pretty slick on snowy mornings.  I am also driving to the ski area daily which although does not implement chain controls, does get dicey at times.

 

I am also concerned about others statements that summer tires suck in cold temps & rain!

 

Any thoughts?

 

Thanks,

JF

post #34 of 40

4ster, sounds like a 2-tires-and-rims quiver to me.

 

Since you want to maximize the peformance of the WRX, get the Mountain symbol tires with rims.  Then, for those days where you really need extra traction, consider Spikes-Spiders.  Easy on, easy off, reputed great traction, recommended for vehicles with limited tire clearance for chains.   http://www.spikes-spiders.com/.

post #35 of 40

I would certainly go with 2 sets of car kicks to run real snows in winter if I lived within 50 miles of ski terrain.  Can't justify that at present with 90% of even my winter driving happening on non winter conditions.  I'll throw iron for a mile or two if I run in to something REALLY REALLY iced over that must be transitioned.  Gotten through more than a foot of fresh on wicked mountain switchbacks many times with just AWD/4WD and not too worn MS kicks.  Haven't chained up since my rear wheel 2WD days.

post #36 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4ster View Post

This thread has got me thinking, & eventually I will probably start a new thread.

 

I have always lived in the mountains & traveled in snow country.  In 1980 I owned a 4WD Subaru hatchback & ran four real snow tires on it.  That car was a tank & never let me down even in a few huge Tahoe snow years.  Since 1990 I have owned 2 Subaru AWD Legacy's & and 2 Impreza WRX's.  On these vehicles I have always run All Season M+S tires & never had a real problem, although I seem to burn through tires really quickly.  Some have been better in the snow than others, & some have been better performance on dry pavement.  None, (like All Mountain Skis) have been the perfect combination.

 

To my surprise, my new 1.5 month old 2012 WRX came with summer tires.  My first thought was to get separate rims & mount some dedicated snows for the winter, & just switch in the summer.  Now I am questioning that idea, as this is high performance car & I am a bit concerned about not having speed rated tires.  So, what to do?  Do I just put All Seasons on my present rims & switch back in the summer till I wear the summer tires out?  Do I get another set of rims & try the Mountain symbol tires which would probably be a traction improvement over All Seasons & still give me decent performance?  Where I live in UT now is not nearly as severe as it was for the many years I lived in Tahoe & had to deal with chain control areas frequently.  I do live on a steep hill now, which gets pretty slick on snowy mornings.  I am also driving to the ski area daily which although does not implement chain controls, does get dicey at times.

 

I am also concerned about others statements that summer tires suck in cold temps & rain!

 

Any thoughts?

 

Thanks,

JF


Get some real winter tires like the T-rated Michelin X ice 2s for the winter, and resign yourself to  not driving at more than 118 mph for more than half an hour at a time (or giving your tires the equivalent workout).  You will notice a big difference in handling and the speed at which you can corner, and there will be an adjustment period in the fall when you have to be careful not to over-cook a corner, but it will feel great in the spring when you switch back.

post #37 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post


Get some real winter tires like the T-rated Michelin X ice 2s for the winter, and resign yourself to  not driving at more than 118 mph for more than half an hour at a time (or giving your tires the equivalent workout).  You will notice a big difference in handling and the speed at which you can corner, and there will be an adjustment period in the fall when you have to be careful not to over-cook a corner, but it will feel great in the spring when you switch back.

LOL, I think I can keep it under 118 mph most of the time.  I will check out the Michelin's.

 

Thanks for everyone's input!  I am not familiar with the Mountain rating, anyone else have some suggestions on any of these.  I don't mind sacrificing a little traction for some performance or durability.  I am with crgildart & haven't put chains on in 30 yrs., & I have driven through some pretty hazardous, blizzard conditions.  The 2nd set of tires on my previous WRX were Pirrelli Pzero9 All Seasons, those tires gripped the road like glue, but were only adequate in the snow & only lasted about 15000 miles.  Even though they were fun, I can't afford to do that again.

 

Thanks,

 

JF

post #38 of 40

So let's say the day was clear and there was no snow on the road in LCC. I head up to Alta in my little 2WD rental, with no snow chains in the car. What are the chances of getting stopped and would it be right at the start of the road, so I could just park and ride up there on the bus?

post #39 of 40

I'd say the chances are slim to none if it's clear - police have better things to do than that. The only police I've seen were at the bottom of the canyon, so you could just turn around to the park n ride.

post #40 of 40

nice, thanks

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