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Best all-mountain ski for the East Coast?

post #1 of 60
Thread Starter 
I am about 5'-6", yes i am small. I weigh 143lbs and have been skiing for 13 years, as of now i am 17. Specifically, I am interested in a twin-tip all-mountain ski. Out of the skis listed which one would suit an experienced east coast skier, who occasionally rides park and goes off-piste. 
 
VOLKL BRIDGES, ROSSIGNOL SCIMITAR, SALOMON 2012'S, Volkl mantra, Volkl, ledges, atomic theory, Rossi scratch, Line Blends, or any other skis. 
 
 
The uppercased skis are skis that i am most interested in. 
 
 
I like a ski that is not too wide, but not to narrow so that I can ski powder but still maintain the feeling of a park ski. 90-98 waist.
post #2 of 60

Hi Welcome to EpicSki!

Sorry for the delay, Summer time often makes for slow responses.

 

Have you tried any of the contemporary skis that aren't twin tips to see if there is something with more all mountain strength? After all, you don't say much about being in the park and there are some skis out there that may suit you a bit better than a twin tip, especially for the east coast. 

post #3 of 60

Yeah but...he's 17....of course he's a park rat!  (or at least he will be soon)

 

I haven't skied but one of those options listed...the Volkl Bridge, and aside from the graphics, I loved it.  And I don't even like Volkl.  The day I used it was about 4" new, chewed up at about 11 AM.  I thought it was springy and fun though.  Not really sure how it would be on ice, but it was the most surefooted thing I skied all that demo day.  I think Volkl says they rockered the newer ones, so they probably suck now.  If it's actually just marketing rocker, where they didn't actually change the ski, then it's probably a good bet.

 

Lots of people on here also like the Mantra for everything.

post #4 of 60

The Volkl Bridge is a great choice. Does well all over the mountain, on trail, off trail and in the park. It does hold a good edge on firm snow. In the 2012 they did add rocker. It is real rocker and not marketing rocker and I thought it improved the ski and made turn initiation super easy and effortless. I really like the Mantra and it held a better edge on firm snow than the Bridge but the Bridge will be better in the park. The Ledge is a good option but in the soft snow and off-piste the Bridge will be better. Out of the others I only skied the Theory and did like it, similar to the Bridge but I did like the Bridge a little bit better. I think by this reply you can see my vote is for the Bridge.

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post #5 of 60

Try the Elan Chainsaw...it will rock all the others...It is a big mountain ski that you can rip turns on corduroy also...

post #6 of 60

Another vote for the Volkl Bridge.  It's a great all mountain twin tip that is also a good value.  I bought the 2011-12 model - added EPL rocker - and the only thing new for this year is the graphic.  You can likely buy then for around $400 plus bindings. 

post #7 of 60

I have demoed the Volkl Bridge, and I enjoyed it.  It had a lot of fun pop to it, but it wasn't unstable and was still pretty wide and nice rocker for when it snows.

However, I don't know how wide and how much rocker you want as you are on the East Coast.

If you do decide to go for the Volkl Bridge, and you have an REI near you, you can get the 2011/2012 model for $330 in a 163cm or 171cm.

http://www.rei.com/product/824369/volkl-bridge-skis-mens-20112012

post #8 of 60

Definitely go for the 171 over the 163 if you go for the Bridge.  It's rocker will make it seem shorter than it is.

post #9 of 60
Don't get the Volkl Bridge. Not one of my favorite skis. I demoed a pair of Atomic Theory's and they are defiantly pretty awesome, a close second to my one quiver ski I use now. If u do plan on skiing some park as speculated above I would check out the Armada ARV. Another ski I would look at that is somewhere in between is the K2 Kung Fujas. These skis while being alittle wider don't ski as wide as they are and can really do a lot around the mountain and are twin tips.
post #10 of 60

HHow about the Saamon Lord?  Can use everywhere....

post #11 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by ski1bum View Post

HHow about the Saamon Lord?  Can use everywhere....

Not the ski for icy or hard pack hills, and it's not just my opinion; I've heard it from several folks who were skiing them in typical Sudbury ON conditions (here in Sudbury and nearby Onaping)

post #12 of 60

Volkl Bridge is one of the few skis I can use in the midwest when we are not racing and also take to CO or Utah and have a blast. Quick, lively and fun to ski.  Mantra is like a log compared. Too much metal makes it slow and a submarine in soft snow. I use my GS skis if I want to be at warp speed

post #13 of 60

I personally have not skied the bridge, but I am 5'9 130lbs and 15 and ride Line Chronic Cryptonite from 2010, and they are perfect for everything.  This was my first season on them and they had great edge grip on the icy conditions.  They ski very well at speed and are good for jumps, they aren't a complete park ski, you can ski them anywhere, just like a normal ski.  They ski amazing regular and switch, and turning is awesome.  I can't speak too much for the flotation due to the lack of anything with deep powder this year but they float well on anything that I skied which was up to 8in but just stashes on the side of trails.  They are thinner than the blends so they will hold a better edge but are still plenty wide to ski with in the east IMHO.

post #14 of 60
How about K2? flexible to all type of skiers. and I've heard many loves to ride with it.
post #15 of 60

I don't think K2 is known for their hard snow/ice performance??

post #16 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by FujativeOCR View Post

I don't think K2 is known for their hard snow/ice performance??

Ca-Ching! OP: Bridge will make you the happiest of the skis you list if you spend more time in the park and on groomers when the snow is stiffer. The Scimitar will make you happiest if you spend more time in softer snow and/or trees. 

post #17 of 60

If you want one ski its the Bridge no question. I have skied it on boilerplate and waist high. Never even go to a park. 

post #18 of 60
Thread Starter 

well i do go to the park, so your statement is invalid

post #19 of 60
Thread Starter 

only problem is the rocker that they have,never mind, but aren't they heavy, I especially like a ski that is flickable but still is great in powder and hard snow conditions. 

post #20 of 60

If you find your one ski that does everything perfectly, let us know.

post #21 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by coasthafron33 View Post

well i do go to the park, so your statement is invalid

His statement is not invalid at all. He's saying that his Bridges work well in other conditions than the park. It does not exclude the park. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by coasthafron33 View Post

only problem is the rocker that they have,never mind, but aren't they heavy, I especially like a ski that is flickable but still is great in powder and hard snow conditions. 

A characteristic of guys who post here about needing new skis is they always want a ski that rocks everywhere for everything. Then we note (like Fujative) that there is no ski that's great everywhere. None. Nada. Zip. Then we advise newcomers to make some priorities. If they do, we can respond. If they don't, and just show attitude, they get ignored or made fun of, depending. 

 

Now let's review: The Bridge is not particularly heavy for an all mountain ski that can handle the park. And in fact, the flex pattern and weight of an all-mountain help it in crud and on ice. And most all mountains these days have some rocker. On the other hand, if you want a ski that's optimized for the park, and light, but can do OK on the rest of the mountain, you should be looking for something narrower - mid-80's are typical - and with springy, fairly soft tips and tails. No rocker. But you do not want a perfectly symmetrical ski because it won't like a lot of terrain outside the park. There are a bunch of park oriented skis, literally every manufacturer makes some, that meet the bill. Suggest you check out Freeskier online, they have a big park section. Epic is not very park-oriented. Out. 

post #22 of 60
Beyond makes some good points...no ski does do it all...knowing now that you do enjoy skiing park I would defiantly reccomend looking at Aramdas specifically the Armada El Reys...a great ski inside park and a good daily driver as well. I am highlighting armada as a company bases a lot of its business around park skis and their all mountain varietys...Look at armada el Rey's and armada arv...also you kno armada is quality because they are owned and made by atomic a first rate company IMO...haven't skiied the arvs but el reya are an excellent ski both at very good prices online right now too (always keep in mind no ski is best at everything)
post #23 of 60

To the OP......

 

You've gotten some good advice, some notsogood and the most important admonition of all which is to select some priorities. However, you haven't been given the reasons why those priorities are important. So hopefully this doesn't drown you in information that you don't really want........

 

Park Ski characteristics: Stance and sidecut set forward to balance the skier's weight in the physical center of the ski. Symmetrical sidecut (or close to it) to balance pressure evenly when skiing normal or switch. Typically softer flex (especially in torsion) in the fore and aft butter zones and to make the ski less catchy in wall transitions. These factors all serve to improve the performance in the park but they are invariably a detriment outside the park and especially on very hard or very heavy snow.

 

All mountain ski characteristics: Sidecut and stance set back from center to improve weight and pressure distribution toward the aft 75% of the ski. Sidecut involves 'taper' from the tip to tail to improve hookup in the front and release at the back. Firmer flex (especially in torsion) to improve the grip and stability on hard or other detrimental conditions. These factors enhance normal skiing performance but run counter to park performance.

 

Any ski that excells at one end of this spectrum will display some notable suckage at the other. Hence the need for priorities. It's not just about the twin tip and the graphic story.

 

SJ 

post #24 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiguy202 View Post

Beyond makes some good points...no ski does do it all...knowing now that you do enjoy skiing park I would defiantly reccomend looking at Aramdas specifically the Armada El Reys...a great ski inside park and a good daily driver as well. I am highlighting armada as a company bases a lot of its business around park skis and their all mountain varietys...Look at armada el Rey's and armada arv...also you kno armada is quality because they are owned and made by atomic a first rate company IMO...haven't skiied the arvs but el reya are an excellent ski both at very good prices online right now too (always keep in mind no ski is best at everything)

 

Atomic owns Armada?  I thought Armadas were only made in Atomics factory, but owned independently?

post #25 of 60
Thread Starter 

thankyou, have you heard of the salomon twenty twelves are they okay. 

post #26 of 60

They are ugly too.

post #27 of 60
Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim View Post

 

...some notable suckage...

 

Sorry, but had to bring up this. It needs to be included in all future reviews. As in ski: 1) Rocked my world, 2) Beat drinking tap, 2) Meh, 3) Notable suckage.

 

OP: You still aren't talking priorities. "Are they OK" could mean almost anything. OK compared to their archetype, the Pocket Rocket, yes. OK compared to the Bridge, in the park probably, outside the park, doubtful. Compared to the Scimitar, ditto, only the Scimitar will be better in freshies and trees at your size than the Bridge, while the Bridge will be better in crud and hardpack than the Scimitar. So:

 

Why ask? What's most important to you? How do you like to spend a day on the slopes? If you had to rank carving hardpack or doing tricks in the halfpipe or freestyling trees in fresh snow, how would they be ordered? We know it's all important to you, but it can't all be equally important when you make a decision about a ski.  

post #28 of 60
Thread Starter 

yea, sorry i'm being a little obtuse, just their is so many different, unique skis to buy. Okay, obviously I ski on the EastCoast so a ski with a waist of 100 or greater is unnecessary. To conclude everything, i'll mostly be on groomers and in the park. I think the twenty twelves will do me fine. They're a great pair of skis that are good in the park, can carve good on the groomers and although they are not a good powder ski, it doesn't really matter because It's all ice up here. I have done my research and mike douglas said they were a great all mountain ski they are also a great tree skier for the east coast. I believe the down side is that they're not a good powder ski, because they hold a 92 waist or something close to that. However, they do have rocker tip and tail. I'll get these skis. THANKS FOR YOUR professional help unlike the help i get at newschoolers who are bias 

post #29 of 60
Thread Starter 

I also like a damp ski, and i here the twenty twelve is pretty darn damp, so i think i'll be picking up the 179's soon.

post #30 of 60
Thread Starter 

groomers, free-style/park, tree-skiing, lastly backcountry powder. Groomers are first, because i'll be on them the most while powder is last. 

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