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What is your LEAST favorite discipline typical type of skiing? - Page 2

Poll Results: Least favorite ski discipline (Alpine)

 
  • 23% (14)
    Bumps
  • 10% (6)
    Corn/Soup
  • 5% (3)
    Cordury
  • 1% (1)
    Crud
  • 18% (11)
    Gates/Racing
  • 41% (25)
    Hardpack/Icy
60 Total Votes  
post #31 of 48

Large sun cups and sastrugi. Deep rain runnels. Truck/small house size avy debris. 

post #32 of 48

It would be rather interesting, on purely technical merit, to have a 3-day whiteout clinic.

post #33 of 48

Does no one else see this as fundamentally a ski design problem?  

 

We want to ski this stuff with pleasure.    We just don't quite have the skis to do it with.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

Large sun cups and sastrugi. Deep rain runnels.

post #34 of 48
Thread Starter 

If anyone believes what 97% of climate scientists do we're going to be seeing more and more corn and slush days n the coming years.  It really is a tough thing to plan for or prepare your bases for because it usually starts as sweet corn then turns all slushy around 11 am, sometimes freezing up solid again before closing at places with night skiing.  We all know the routine of trying to load empty chairs at mid station on these warm days because the farther down you go, the worse it gets.

 

One thing is for certain.  The grabby stuff keeps me OFF my toes rather than on them.

post #35 of 48

I noticed you didn't include powder. I would love to see if anyone would select that.   

 

 

BTW-  hardpack with a thin base more specifically

post #36 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post It really is a tough thing to plan for or prepare your bases for because it usually starts as sweet corn then turns all slushy around 11 am, sometimes freezing up solid again before closing at places with night skiing. 

 

Try super-hard fluoro with /no/ structure.

post #37 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

Does no one else see this as fundamentally a ski design problem?  

 

We want to ski this stuff with pleasure.    We just don't quite have the skis to do it with.

 

 

Just curious, but have you ever skied this stuff (Sun cups, sastugi, rain runnels) ? Small of any of the above, sure. Large? Not so fun. 'Just say'in' as they say. I've never seen any of the mentioned ski area boundary other than small'ish rain runnels.

post #38 of 48

I avoid the bumps for two reasons:  1. Four knee surgeries, and 2.  My technique sucks.

 

Actually I don't mind ice.  I seem to have better racing results on boilerplate compared with how I usually do against the rest of the field.

 

And ruts?  You've never experienced ruts until you've been on an Ice Coast race course.....

 

ruts.jpg

post #39 of 48

Racing just because I get no enjoyment out of competitive skiing,

As far as hardpack / icy is concerned that depends entirely on the skis... if I've got something thin with good edge hold it's quite fun, though I despise it with most fatter skis.


 

post #40 of 48

 Again, the fact that it's not fun is fundamentally a ski design problem.     

 

We have skis now that make powder fun and accessible - 40 years ago they didn't exist.   Solved by progress in technology and design.

 

We have bicycles now that can be and are ridden with enormous fun in terrain equivalent to suncups/sastrugi - 40 years ago they didn't exist.   Solved by progress in technology and design.

 

Making the difficult possible and accessible is the role of technology.   Making the possible fun is the role of design.   

 

The fact that I don't know what the hypothetical sun cup / sastrugi ski would look like doesn't mean I don't want one.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by markojp View Post

 

Just curious, but have you ever skied this stuff (Sun cups, sastugi, rain runnels) ? Small of any of the above, sure. Large? Not so fun. 'Just say'in' as they say. I've never seen any of the mentioned ski area boundary other than small'ish rain runnels.

post #41 of 48
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

 Again, the fact that it's not fun is fundamentally a ski design problem.     

 

We have skis now that make powder fun and accessible - 40 years ago they didn't exist.   Solved by progress in technology and design.

 


 

416mgOejK7L._AA300_.jpg

 

th_dunno-1[1].gif

post #42 of 48

Come to Whitefish.  

Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

It would be rather interesting, on purely technical merit, to have a 3-day whiteout clinic.

post #43 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post

 Again, the fact that it's not fun is fundamentally a ski design problem.     

 

We have skis now that make powder fun and accessible - 40 years ago they didn't exist.   Solved by progress in technology and design.

 

We have bicycles now that can be and are ridden with enormous fun in terrain equivalent to suncups/sastrugi - 40 years ago they didn't exist.   Solved by progress in technology and design.

 

Making the difficult possible and accessible is the role of technology.   Making the possible fun is the role of design.   

 

The fact that I don't know what the hypothetical sun cup / sastrugi ski would look like doesn't mean I don't want one.

 

 

 

But it's tough to design a 'powder' ski if one has never skied powder. So just asking what you think might be a good shape for sun cups, sastrugi, etc...  If you've been there, you might have an idea that hasn't been thought of before. Trouble is, getting to places where you find these things usually involves a good amount of human powered 'up'. It's pretty doubtful that anyone's going to come up with a mega-sastrugi busting ski though.

post #44 of 48

My least favorite typical discipline type of skiing?

 

Every year my ski school would have a session in which every instructor was supposed to ski down the hill toward the video camera doing short turns in the fall line. What seemed to be desired by "short turns", judging by the performance, was actually some kind of wedeln. You can imagine what it was like, lots of butt swinging and heel pushing. Almost anyone of these folks on a good hard slalom course would have been lost. I used to somewhat defiantly ski down doing actual short turns(well what I think of as short turns anyway). Invariably on the video replay later in the lodge would be heard my director or one of his supervisors: "whats ******** doing?" " I don't know, some kind of PSIA crap". Thats the kind of thing I hate , knowing that there is some truth to what the racers say about ski instructors: "They all ski like golf carts, slow and they all look alike".

post #45 of 48

If someone held a gun to my head and forced me to attend a three day clinic in those categories my least favorite would be racing.  I have no interest in racing - it seems to involve a lot of waiting to ski.

 

As for Ice, corn snow, bumps and ice: I ski in the northwest, where mother nature constantly spins the Wheel of Random Difficult Ski Conditions.  I love em' all.

post #46 of 48

Of the categories listed, my least favorite would be bumps. I'm used to skiing on ice/hardpack and on a well-tuned pair of sticks can haul and carve.

 

I'd probably take the bump clinic and skip the ice/hardpack clinic though. I do want to learn to ski bumps better because you can always run into them on the mountain. 

 

The ice hardpack clinic would turn my feet to pulp after a few hours and would also be murder on my hips and knees.

post #47 of 48

Funny thing is that I actually enjoy hardpack on a cold day. With the right pair of skis, it's fun. And while my knees don't like bumps, my brain does, and anyway, bumps are half of everything I get to ski. Only condition I can't love is slush/soup. Mainly because it's too far removed from the light, quick feeling I associate with mid-season skiing, more like leftovers at the end of the season. 

post #48 of 48

I am pretty much with Beyond. I like skiing groomed hard pack when conditions are really hard due to no fresh snow in weeks.  When it is like that I really hate the hard bumps, as my skill level only works with soft bumps. Once we get to Spring conditions and the snow is getting really soft by 11am, I am over it.  Sticky snow is the worst IMO.  There is no way I want to drive 6 hours from San Diego to Mammoth to deal with that stuff.  Maybe someday I will get to experience "corn" as so many people rave about it.

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