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The end of the NFL as we know it? - Page 2

post #31 of 50

I don't think there has been a link established between autism and football though.

post #32 of 50

Only 1/3 of the brains were for autism research.  The other 2/3rds were for other disorders. 

 

 

Quote:
An official at the renowned brain bank in Belmont discovered that the freezer had shut down in late May, without triggering two alarms. Inside, they found 150 thawed brains that had turned dark from decay; about a third of them were part of a collection of autism brains.
 

 

 

I heard a rumor that Jenny McCarthy was seen in the area though..

 

Also this guy...

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m7-bMBuVmHo

 

 

NFL has HUGE motive to destroy that evidence..

post #33 of 50

Regardless of what was posted previously, the concussion suit may not gain traction: http://www.forbes.com/sites/danielfisher/2012/06/12/nfl-concussion-suit-likely-to-get-sacked-by-employment-law/  .  This is too bad for the injured NFL players and, more importantly, all the kids in "Pee-Wee" and "Pop Warner" football leagues who have no business playing tackle ball at that age.  KCBS radio interviewed John Madden a couple of months ago (if it was that long ago), whose son coached high school freshman football.  John asked his son how much kids gain by playing kids tackle football over kids that start in the ninth grade.  His son answered, "About two weeks."  

 

We all love to see car crashes, big time football hits, crashes in the downhill, MMA knockouts, etc.  Being optimists, most people assume everything will end up OK.  In terms of head injuries, that assumption may not be correct.

post #34 of 50

Probably a zombie attack.

post #35 of 50

So, I know folks in Boston that know folks.  Hearsay from a friend of a friend of a friend...... that works in that lab is that some idiot simply left the door open.  They disabled the alarm awhile ago because it was often going off for no apparent reason.  I guess they should have gotten it fixed.  Rumblings of sabotage from anti stem cell research folks (big pharm, religious folks, etc) has also been tossed around as a possibility.

post #36 of 50

It was probably aliens. Or the Kennedys. Or George W. Bush!

post #37 of 50

I can beleive they would hide it, they want them around to make the money. The problem is that it is counter productive, they loose the players due to injury and end up paying out settlements and so on.
 

post #38 of 50

I'm late to the party on this thread, but free choice and personal accountability is a big deal, and I'm not a huge fan of the lawsuits. That said, the best thing that could come out of all of the concussion talk in pro sports is education across all levels of sports.  There are still doctors that don't know their arse from a hole in the ground when it comes to concussions. Those Docs are part of the problem when it comes to people- everyone from pro athletes to high school athletes-  going back out onto the field before they're ready to. Concussions are always going to happen, and there isn't anything that anyone can do to prevent them- especially in sports where thoroughbred-type athletes that are getting bigger, stronger, and faster by the minute are colliding with each other.  

What everyone needs to take from the discussion is that if you get a concussion, most times it's the time spent healing (or not) that is generally going to mean the difference between having miserable post concussion type symptoms or not.  If it's the player's first concussion, recovery is typically going to be easier than a subsequent one, but you need to sit out until completely symptom-free. That's critical. 

I don't mind seeing the lawsuits go away as long as anyone in a position to allow someone back out onto the field after getting dinged understood the consequences of letting a player go back out there before they should.

post #39 of 50

And so it goes...  another step in the direction of flag football with the banning of "smashmouth" football.  Runners can't use their heads against defense, stiffarms will be next..

 

 

Quote:
On Tuesday at the NFL’s annual meetings at the Arizona Biltmore, debate continued over a proposed rule that would require a 15-yard penalty to be assessed if any ball carrier, while outside the tackle box and more than 3 yards down field, “initiates forcible contact by delivering a blow with the top/crown of his helmet against an opponent.”
 
post #40 of 50

It really is unreal , sir Roger is ruining the game.  We all know its dangerous so do the players thats why they are paid so much.  I mean i get the qb's being protected more than other players as this league is dependent on them for ratings and money but geez a guy cant put his head down now thats just stupid.  Refs are gonna start deciding games more and more based on calls with these new rules.. I was always the hey let em play and beat the hell outta eachother kinda guy and never thought unless a player died on the field during a game that all these rules would be changed. The real men of the 60's, 70's and 80's must be laughing at this
 

post #41 of 50

Everyone who plays football knows what the deal is, even at the high school level or earlier.  A bunch of lawyers are ruining the game.

post #42 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

Everyone who plays football knows what the deal is, even at the high school level or earlier.  A bunch of lawyers are ruining the game.

Not exactly. What do the children (8th grade and younger) who play this game know? The parents might know, but there is no way a 5th grader can make an informed decision. By the time they get to high school they are already indoctrinated. I see many of my son's friends concussed and hobbled from HS football. The injury rate is 100%. There is no other youth sport like it. If the NFL does not make changes their multibillion dollar business will eventually fade. The changes they make always filter down to the youth level.

post #43 of 50

 SO lemme ask u this would u be in your seat every sunday on the couch if we had them play flag football instead of tackling so nobody got hurt?  Because thats where we are heading.  America enjoys the hits and so does everyone else i know.

post #44 of 50

I think the NFL needs to think along the lines of what nascar did recently , they installed softer walls so crashes wouldnt be as devastating and reducing injury.  Nascar still hasnt suffered from this they still drive 500 miles and 200+ and thats a good thing, what roger does with the NFL woulda been the equal to nascar having a 150mph governer on all cars in keeping hard walls but they adapted saw a problem with death and injury and tried something new so perhaps and i dont know how someone needs to think outside the box and relate that to pads and helmets?  SO we can please go full speed again
 

post #45 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by x10003q View Post

Not exactly. What do the children (8th grade and younger) who play this game know? The parents might know, but there is no way a 5th grader can make an informed decision. By the time they get to high school they are already indoctrinated. I see many of my son's friends concussed and hobbled from HS football. The injury rate is 100%. There is no other youth sport like it. If the NFL does not make changes their multibillion dollar business will eventually fade. The changes they make always filter down to the youth level.

 

Yes, but this whole topic is about the NFL and legal liabilities (it's not really about player safety).  As if any player enters college ball much less the pros and doesn't know what the deal is.  I chose not to play in high school because of the odds for some type of injury that could prevent me from playing my other sports (ironically, I had at least 3 concussions playing high school soccer).

 

I agree that pop warner is a different discussion entirely.

post #46 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

 

Yes, but this whole topic is about the NFL and legal liabilities (it's not really about player safety).  As if any player enters college ball much less the pros and doesn't know what the deal is.  I chose not to play in high school because of the odds for some type of injury that could prevent me from playing my other sports (ironically, I had at least 3 concussions playing high school soccer).

 

I agree that pop warner is a different discussion entirely.


Its funny that none of this ever even came up til former players who seriously are all messed up now mentally and physically are not being taken care of my the NFL and basically being left for dead in their current state.

post #47 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevez33 View Post

 SO lemme ask u this would u be in your seat every sunday on the couch if we had them play flag football instead of tackling so nobody got hurt?  Because thats where we are heading.  America enjoys the hits and so does everyone else i know.

I am not sure. I have not been watching as much in the last few seasons as the flow of the games has been destroyed by all the commercial breaks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

 

Yes, but this whole topic is about the NFL and legal liabilities (it's not really about player safety).  As if any player enters college ball much less the pros and doesn't know what the deal is.  I chose not to play in high school because of the odds for some type of injury that could prevent me from playing my other sports (ironically, I had at least 3 concussions playing high school soccer).

 

I agree that pop warner is a different discussion entirely.

The point about those who play college and the few in the pros know what they are in for is a little disingenuous. If they are good enough to be playing at these levels they are not going to stop because of the risk. The lure of scholarship money/admission to a better school clouds the potential injury problems. Then, if they can actually make money playing football after working at the game for more than 10 years are they going to say no? I doubt it.

 

The problem is that it starts in Pop Warner. Once you start playing it is difficult to stop, especially if you are good at it. When you are in HS you are still generally unable to process the risks. You did and kudos to you, but most kids will not make that decision.

post #48 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevez33 View Post


Its funny that none of this ever even came up til former players who seriously are all messed up now mentally and physically are not being taken care of my the NFL and basically being left for dead in their current state.

 

Oh for sure.  I'm not defending the NFL - they were pretty horrible in this regard.  Shouldn't the best health insurance for the remainder of your life be automatically granted to anyone who plays at least one full season?

 

College programs are even worse, however.  Most of those kids walk out of there without making the big NFL dollars and still have to deal with the after effects.  And they didn't even get paid to play while the schools make millions off them.

post #49 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post
College programs are even worse, however.  Most of those kids walk out of there without making the big NFL dollars and still have to deal with the after effects.  And they didn't even get paid to play while the schools make millions off them.

NCAA and the members are the worst criminals of all while hiding behind "non-profit" status. Free labor for some food and a bed. No rights to a lawyer to negotiate your "contract", no ablilty to move to another school if you do not like your situation, all in bed with the NFL to make all players stay at the college level even if they are ready to move up.  A free minor league system for the NFL that 99% of the players in the NFL have to go through including all the physical risks. Then they own your image for all the gaming. Horrible.

post #50 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

 

Oh for sure.  I'm not defending the NFL - they were pretty horrible in this regard.  Shouldn't the best health insurance for the remainder of your life be automatically granted to anyone who plays at least one full season?

 

College programs are even worse, however.  Most of those kids walk out of there without making the big NFL dollars and still have to deal with the after effects.  And they didn't even get paid to play while the schools make millions off them.


  Oh defidently i have a few friends here in Florida that are gators i get up to a few games a year, every week 90K of people the money they make is hard to fathom, the only negative about going to a college game is if its on its campus like UF games theres no alcohol sold, which is why i dont mind going to usf and ucf games once and awhile i just like having a beer while watching sports.  This will now bring up a totally different topic should college players be allocated a certain amount of money each month, not necessarily paid but something i mean these SEC schools down here like Bama, UF etc are litereally raking it in i could only imagine how much they make.

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