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Are that down unweight type turn moving?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

One question ask, please and thanks.

 

Are that turning is down unweight type turn moving?

 

Am I do Absorb?

post #2 of 9
Quote:

Are that turning is down unweight type turn moving?

 

 

What?  LOL

 

Quote:

Am I do Absorb?

 

 

Yes, you do, in the second shot.  Your best absorption is on your last turn (the one you put in slow motion).  The amount you absorb should be equal to the size of the mogul.  You are doing a little bit less than that. 

 

Your timing for absorption can also get better.  On your middle turn, in your second shot you absorb early. 

post #3 of 9

I agree with Blake. Always remember that what feels like a lot of movement when you do it will not be as much as you think. Exaggerate the movement and it may come close. That last turn is better. You are, however, leaving your arm behind in your pole plant which is causing inbalance and some rotation. Keep the arms forward and don't leave the pole in the snow after you've planted it.

post #4 of 9
I call those down motion turns, not down unweighting, Norman. You are correct that the goal is to absorb the bump so that it doesn't disturb your progress down the slope. The absorbing movement can be either passive--you just relax your muscles and let the snow push your feet toward your core--or active, where you pull your feet up quickly. Either way, you want to keep your weight over your feet so that you can extend on the other side of the bump and guide the ski tips toward downhill. If you fail to extend to press the skis into the snow after the bump, you have no length to shorten for the next bump.
post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blake Saunders View Post

 

What?  LOL

 

 

Yes, you do, in the second shot.  Your best absorption is on your last turn (the one you put in slow motion).  The amount you absorb should be equal to the size of the mogul.  You are doing a little bit less than that. 

 

Your timing for absorption can also get better.  On your middle turn, in your second shot you absorb early. 

 

 

Sorry, my English not good.

 

Thank you.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Adie View Post

I agree with Blake. Always remember that what feels like a lot of movement when you do it will not be as much as you think. Exaggerate the movement and it may come close. That last turn is better. You are, however, leaving your arm behind in your pole plant which is causing inbalance and some rotation. Keep the arms forward and don't leave the pole in the snow after you've planted it.

 

Thank you.

 

I will especially to care.

post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post

I call those down motion turns, not down unweighting, Norman. You are correct that the goal is to absorb the bump so that it doesn't disturb your progress down the slope. The absorbing movement can be either passive--you just relax your muscles and let the snow push your feet toward your core--or active, where you pull your feet up quickly. Either way, you want to keep your weight over your feet so that you can extend on the other side of the bump and guide the ski tips toward downhill. If you fail to extend to press the skis into the snow after the bump, you have no length to shorten for the next bump.

Thank your Explanation and good point.

 

I will care and remember.

 

I use both, but pull my feet up is first.

post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post

I call those down motion turns, not down unweighting, 

 

Could you explain what is "down motion turns"? Is this an advanced technique?

 

Also, is Blake doing the down motion turns in this video?

 

 

TIA

post #8 of 9
I think Blake is doing extension turns in the longer radius turns such as at the start of the clip and is doing what I'd consider avalement, which is active pulling up of the feet, and reploiment, which is passively allowing the snow to push the feet up, in most of the bump turns. Down motion turns are are like his bump turns but less active and are used more to set the edges than to absorb bumps. I probably misused the term down motion turn when responding to Norman's question.
post #9 of 9

What Kneale said explaining my technique is extremely accurate (although I do not understand all of the terminology in this thread).  I do more pulling up of my feet than anything else.  Here is a post I just made that goes into more detail: 

http://www.epicski.com/t/112838/a-thing-i-wrote-on-mogul-absorption

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