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MA Just for fun.. Squaw, 4-16-2012 - Page 3

post #61 of 66
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post

What's the "normal" relationship of the tibia length to femur length, David? What is yours?

Not sure what normal or average is but after a lengthy dialog with Mike from the bootfitters group,

My height is 5'8" . In bare feet, if i measure from the ground to the top of my knee cap I measure 21"
Mike took the same measurement on himself. He is 5'11" and his "tibia measurement" is 20"

While this is not the gold standard or an exact measurement (I don't have xrays of my tibia, only my femur) Mike and I have agreed that my Tibia is indeed long for my height.

So on top of the knee being further forward thus moving my COM further forward, the other effect it will have is I have longer levers to press on, thus amplifying the force or effect I have on the boot cuff. Also something else I did not know is that boots are designed and built around the assumption that the average foot size is 26.5. Geometry designs are not changed when the boot is smaller or larger. I am in a 25.5 so a shorter boot will have the same angles but a shorter base of support also amplifing the symptom of feeling like I was too far forward. Add in delta of bindings also designed with a "longer" boot in mind. Shorter boot means even more "ramp"

Bottom line is it took some experimenting to get me dialed in to where I am .

Is it perfect? Probably not. But it is working for me and that is what matters at this point.

It also helps me understand this a great deal more so I can apply this knowledge in teaching as well as assisting others.
post #62 of 66
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro View Post

...requires falling into the new turn like a sack of potatoes being thrown down the hill.


What would I offer as an area of focus? The long leg, short leg idea but with a bit more focus on reaching with the pelvis (raising the inside hip / lowering the outside hip).



The last thought I want to offer is that while we want to be as relatively offensive as possible, an element of defensive speed control is present as well on steeper, narrower terrain. Smearing includes that mixed intent but through the transition I would say Dchan needs to shift slightly more towards the offensive end

That's a bit of a long winded way to say overall I like his turns and would suggest wholesale changes aren't needed.

Thanks JASP

My understanding of the Toppling is just that. Not so much an "active throwing" of the COM down the hill but more a gentle subtle tipping of the weight through the transition. Less blocking or a little be more "offensive" through the transition without the "active" tossing of COM into the new turn.

Long leg short leg.... Yup. As Gibbs would say.. "working on it"
Trying to use both hips and legs together to accomplish this. " Not too much, not to little, just enough."


Thanks for the comments.

DC
post #63 of 66

Less blocking is a good way to imagine this but no blocking would be an even better way to imagine how the dual paths concept works. I know it's a tired statement to say if you block on the steeps, then you block everywhere. It might not be more than a momentary thing but it's there. That's why the huck the potato sack move exists in the first place. As a corrective move (occasional not habitual) it has value, if it's your default transitional move, then you need to look at what you are doing with your stance through the shaping phase. No static stances is another tired phrase but especially on steeps we need to avoid static stances.

 

Shifting gears a bit, it all comes down to confidence. If you believe you can finish the turn well, starting it well becomes a lot easier. When doubt creeps in it manifests itself as hesitation and (you guessed it) blocking. O.K. that sounds like a commercial, or my personal agenda but IMO it's incredibly important to discover the line between confidence and doubt before you get into situations where you suddenly and unintentionally enter the "yikes" zone.

 

Anyways, back to the mechanical arena, a quick exercise to discover how much you block is to go to the beginner corral and do some one footed releases. Notice I didn't mention any re-engagement. It teaches us to simply release the edge and go where the ski takes us. BTW, the ski should slide directly down the fall line and if a traverse creeps into this drill you really aren't releasing the ski. In my experience, the most common cause of this unintentional traverse is a static core position. Said differently, it's not just a leg release, the body needs to move with the ski and for that to happen you need to actively move it over that ski.

Hope that makes sense,

Ski well!

post #64 of 66
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the clarification. I believe that my training direction is probably what got me skiing as well as I did during the exam this April and got me a pass. The confidence part was huge.. I spent the last several months (most of this season) just skiing the worst and cruddiest snow and slopes I could get on. Steeps, bumps Icy, slushy, avalanche debris (not as bad as Bob Peters picture however) and tried to  ski it fast, ski it offensively, ski it slow, make round turns, make varied type turns, make short turns, make GS turns, etc..The main goal, was to get so I was comfortable regardless of what it was so that I could continue to make positive movements instead of defensive movements. Since I'm still trying to unlearn 40+ years of defensive movements and instincts as well as some "fad" patterns that PSIA and other groups tried for a while, I'm sure they are going to creep into my skiing. How much they creep in is all about how much time I can ski.

 

It used to be "Do I have to go down that?" and some hesitation with the first turn. If it was REAL steep or iffy conditions, probably a lot of hesitation and very defensive skiing but I was always strong enough of a skier to make it down.

 

Now pretty much anything I come across is "I can ski that" and will go right in.. It may not always be the most pleasant snow or conditions, it may not always be pretty or super solid. There will generally be healthy respect for conditions and danger but for the most part, I won't hesitate to go right in. (as you say, Confidence)  I still don't like dropping off cliffs or getting my feet too far off the ground but that's something for a different discussion.

post #65 of 66

$.01 from the hackskier/non-instructor,

Looks ok dchan...you made it down alive!!..we ALL get better from somewhere.  Static upperbody/hips often leads to anything but dynamic balance...and often leads to the overworked & somewhat stiff joints/legs -thing...which kills the ability to relax and add angulation and inclination...--> shows by the leaning into the hill, with one's upperbody..at best..over your uphill ski.  More forward intent with balance...it's much more relaxing, in the long run, to command the skis what to do and where to go..and also helps in determining what rotation is actually needed as you'll work with gravity more than fight it thru muscling.   That all probably loses a lot as far as being technically succinct I know..;-)  

Good to see someone skiing actual snow though in April..icon14.gif


Edited by HaveSkisWillClimb - 5/22/12 at 9:48am
post #66 of 66

from Dchan:

Thanks JASP

My understanding of the Toppling is just that. Not so much an "active throwing" of the COM down the hill but more a gentle subtle tipping of the weight through the transition. Less blocking or a little be more "offensive" through the transition without the "active" tossing of COM into the new turn.

Long leg short leg.... Yup. As Gibbs would say.. "working on it"
Trying to use both hips and legs together to accomplish this. " Not too much, not to little, just enough."

---

I used to see it exactly that same way - "allowing" the CM to flow down the hill, ie i was more inside/downhill leg retraction, focus on the short leg

 

At a recent clinic the leader said he thinks more about the long leg, ie getting on the big toe edge of the uphill ski as early as he can.

This did wonders for my skiing, especially my stance.  My being "upside down" early and standing on that long leg, i could keep

much better stance width and greater edge angles earlier in the turn.

 

This was on groomed moderate terrain, but nonetheless the focus to more active long leg (instead of more passive short leg)

was a real "ah-ha" moment for me.

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