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Salomon Guardian/atomic Tracker vs. Tyrolia Adrenelin (and whatever fischer is calling theirs..) - Page 5

post #121 of 146
Thread Starter 

The thing I really like and appreciate about the Blister reviews is that they don't just use the product for a few runs or hours, they test this stuff over time. the opinions can really change over many days of use. 

 

Still holding on any final decisions. I really need 2 pair so I am leaning towards a QK setup or a plate system. Gotta see how this all shakes out.

post #122 of 146

Not to be a nag. But the hassle, expense, risk, etc in some of those options is pretty real. Tapping that many super-precision holes in a high end exotic layup ski... Sticking plates on said skis... Not saying it is "wrong". But often practice deviates from theory in this sort of circumstance.

 

For my .02, just throw an EPF Duke or Tracker/Guardian on one pair and ski & skin one good day. Your informed decision making capacity will be much enhanced. I learned so much in my first 30 minutes it still makes me laugh - mostly about my amazing super-gaper powers...smile.gif

post #123 of 146

I have the dynaduke plates which I bought after considering the quiver killers. I think the plates are much more idiot proof and easier to install. With the inserts, I think there is more risk of screwing it up. 

 

In truth, I think the dynafits ski about as well as most alpine binders. In the future, if I were mounting a powder oriented ski, had a 120-130 flex AT boot (e.g. cochise), then just mounting dynafits with no alpine option is a decent way to go. 


Edited by tromano - 8/7/12 at 6:52pm
post #124 of 146
Thread Starter 

I am all ready self-aware of this...biggrin.gif  but my guess is within an hour you started to figure it out though?

Quote:
Originally Posted by spindrift View Post

Not to be a nag. But the hassle, expense, risk, etc in some of those options is pretty real. Tapping that many super-precision holes in a high end exotic layup ski... Sticking plates on said skis... Not saying it is "wrong". But often practice deviates from theory in this sort of circumstance.

 

For my .02, just throw an EPF Duke or Tracker/Guardian on one pair and ski & skin one good day. Your informed decision making capacity will be much enhanced. I learned so much in my first 30 minutes it still makes me laugh - mostly about my amazing super-gaper powers...smile.gif

post #125 of 146
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

I have the dynaduke plates which I bought after considering the quiver killers. I think the plates are much more idiot proof and easier to install. With the inserts, I think there is more risk of screwing it up. 

 

In truth, I think the dynafits ski about as well as most alpine binders. In the future, if I were mounting a powder oriented ski, had a 120-130 flex AT boot (e.g. cochise), then just mounting dynafits with no alpine option is a decent way to go. 

 

all very true here. 

post #126 of 146

Plates are the way to go if you want to switch between multiple bindings ie guardian/duke and dynafit. QK inserts are better IMHO if you are only using one pair of bindings. Less holes in the skis and no riser. I use both systems because some of my skis I want to have the dynafit option and some I don't. I agree the plates are easier to instal but they are also more $. Jon from binding freedom is awesome though, he makes a good product and is a mag over at TGR.

 

 

Quote:
In truth, I think the dynafits ski about as well as most alpine binders. In the future, if I were mounting a powder oriented ski, had a 120-130 flex AT boot (e.g. cochise), then just mounting dynafits with no alpine option is a decent way to go.

I definitely disagree. I like my dynafits when up matters, but I don't feel like I can really put my faith in them in all situation. I've blown out two sets of dynafit toes in the bc and now I'm on plums instead. Plums are awesome, plain and simple. No problems with them so far, but without brakes I wouldn't want to ski them inbounds. I also still believe that I get a significantly better skiing experience with an alpine crossover binding like the guardian. The guardian skis wayyyyyyy better than dynafits and I would always choose those over dyna or plum for alpine/sidecountry set up. I know higher dins are "over rated" here on epic, but in reality running at the top of your din range (I usually ski around an 11 or 12) isn't the best for the binding. Why else would so many 110lb racer girls ski on 16-30 din race bindings? When pre releasing isnt an option, I would much much rather have an at crossover binding on my feet than dynafits.

post #127 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by tromano View Post

In truth, I think the dynafits ski about as well as most alpine binders. In the future, if I were mounting a powder oriented ski, had a 120-130 flex AT boot (e.g. cochise), then just mounting dynafits with no alpine option is a decent way to go. 

 

while i agree with this, i also don't agree with this.

 

simply put, a tech binding is every bit as responsive and precise as alpine bindings, which means they ski well on groomed and soft snow.  however, since tech bindings have way less elasticity, if you mach thru cut up pow and crud pre-release is likely.  if you ski clean and round and deliberately thru cut up snow, then they will likely work well for you inbounds.  

post #128 of 146

Finndog: I am beginning to gather that you have never toured at all. If this is the case I would highly recommend that you borrow/rent a set-up before purchasing any form of a touring binding. I know quite a few folks who got all gung-ho about touring, bought the full monty and then went out and realized that it was a lot of work that they weren't really that gung-ho about doing in regards to the hike-to-turn ratio (the same can be said about patch skiing: it's a lot of work for very few turns, which is why you don't see a bunch of folks out on the hiking trails around the Sierra lugging skis throughout the summer). I borrowed gear (and was prepared to rent, just lucked out that several buddies of mine have the same BSL) for the first few tours I went on just to make sure that I wanted to invest in the gear. 

 

Of course if you have the disposable income burning a hole in your pocket, buy away!

 

:)

post #129 of 146
Thread Starter 

Dookey, I stated right up front I am a newb!  Good idea but I can't imagine I wouldn't enjoy it. I love snowshoeing and hiking up hill in the winter. I have fun stuff in my back yard. I am not doing it just for the downhill, I love climbing on my mtn bike over taking a lift up BTW. the work is part of the reward. there is no joy without suffering  biggrin.gif

post #130 of 146
Quote:
simply put, a tech binding is every bit as responsive and precise as alpine bindings, which means they ski well on groomed and soft snow. however, since tech bindings have way less elasticity, if you mach thru cut up pow and crud pre-release is likely. if you ski clean and round and deliberately thru cut up snow, then they will likely work well for you inbounds.

Well put Marshall. Some people's skiing style can fit with dynafits inbounds, but its just not for me. I guess you have to figure out if you are the type of skier that could go only dynafit Finn but I'd still recommend the plates if you have the money to pull off two pairs of binders.

post #131 of 146
Thread Starter 

still a work in progress.  Dookeys right in the sense that I am not sure how much I will love this but I do understand it and I appreciate what it offers. I do know I will do some hiking due to what's off my back porch and where some of my friends go. I will need it in BC. we also go to Chile/Argentina. I don't want to rush into a setup I don't need or want. I am in a position to spend what I need to but right now, I don't really know what that is. That's why for now I think it just makes sense to go to a framed binding and share on my 112's and 138's. Plates or QK's seem the way to go. If I go plate, then I can always add a Tech/plum without redrilling.

post #132 of 146

On the other hand, if you do go with one of the Guardian / Trackers / Markers / Adrenaline and decided it's not your cup of tea, it should be pretty easy to sell barely used.  Same deal with dynafits, plums, etc.

post #133 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

On the other hand, if you do go with one of the Guardian / Trackers / Markers / Adrenaline and decided it's not your cup of tea, it should be pretty easy to sell barely used.  Same deal with dynafits, plums, etc.


Or you could just ski the shit out of them.

post #134 of 146

finndog- don't over think it man.

 

if you have, or are buying tech compatible boots, and do not intend to ski the skis often inbounds unless its soft, then get tech bindings.

if you are planning on using alpine boots or non-tech AT boots, then get the guardian/duke/tyrolia solution that seems to speak to you (of note the salmons are NOT compatible with a rocketed AT sole).

 

cheers!

 

 

ps- and to those that asked, i believe a pair of adrenaline's are headed to SA with blister, and I will have new dukes, guardians and adrenalines to test as soon as there is snow in utah.  

post #135 of 146
Thread Starter 

yeah, I am trying not to. That's why I am in a holding pattern here. I wanted to see if the co-pro fits but I have to wait till my ankle heals up enough. I am really not stressing this. It will all fall into place.  I am so pysched to take the 138's and hike up my back hill; 2 miles with 1K vertical. it would be some traversing here and there but a lot of fun low angle stuff and just a nice walk. I bought those cherry Pures from you so I hate to put a heavy binding on them :)

post #136 of 146

Quote:
Originally Posted by esales09 View Post

Plates are the way to go if you want to switch between multiple bindings ie guardian/duke and dynafit. QK inserts are better IMHO if you are only using one pair of bindings. Less holes in the skis and no riser. I use both systems because some of my skis I want to have the dynafit option and some I don't. I agree the plates are easier to instal but they are also more $. Jon from binding freedom is awesome though, he makes a good product and is a mag over at TGR.

 

 

I definitely disagree. I like my dynafits when up matters, but I don't feel like I can really put my faith in them in all situation. I've blown out two sets of dynafit toes in the bc and now I'm on plums instead. Plums are awesome, plain and simple. No problems with them so far, but without brakes I wouldn't want to ski them inbounds. I also still believe that I get a significantly better skiing experience with an alpine crossover binding like the guardian. The guardian skis wayyyyyyy better than dynafits and I would always choose those over dyna or plum for alpine/sidecountry set up. I know higher dins are "over rated" here on epic, but in reality running at the top of your din range (I usually ski around an 11 or 12) isn't the best for the binding. Why else would so many 110lb racer girls ski on 16-30 din race bindings? When pre releasing isnt an option, I would much much rather have an at crossover binding on my feet than dynafits.

They are fine for me and the way I ski but don't work for you where you ski. I was suggesting that he could try them and see if they work for him. If it works that's great to save money and have a more simple more lightweight setup with less stuff to break. Or if its not working and he need more binding then plug the holes, mount the swap plates and be done with it.  

 

The flip side of that, would be to just mount dukes / guardians and see if he ever goes touring at all... 

 

I have the dynadukes and swap mine as well, but on powder days I have gotten by with dynafits with out a problem. I usually ski at around a 9-9.5 din. My home mountain is small and has "fun terrain" not much extreme.  I don't clearly remember the last time I skied "no fall terrain where a release isn't an option". Even at 40* falling in powder you won't slide too far. Finndog skis steamboat, not snowbird, he might be able to get by with dynafits on a powder ski.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by msolson View Post

 

while i agree with this, i also don't agree with this.

 

simply put, a tech binding is every bit as responsive and precise as alpine bindings, which means they ski well on groomed and soft snow.  however, since tech bindings have way less elasticity, if you mach thru cut up pow and crud pre-release is likely.  if you ski clean and round and deliberately thru cut up snow, then they will likely work well for you inbounds.  

 

Yea, the lack of elasticity is an issue and prevents great crudbusting. But I was talking about how dynafits work for me for skiing utah powder at an uncrowded ski hill, not doing something else somewhere else. 


Edited by tromano - 8/8/12 at 8:17pm
post #137 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by msolson View Post

(of note the salmons are NOT compatible with a rocketed AT sole).

 

That right there is another + in favor of the Adrenalin (at least from the Fischer demo video it appears that the Adrenalin is compatible with all forms of boots).

post #138 of 146

So whats the verdict?  This thread died before the Gaurdian/Tracker was available.  What the consensus?  Is it worth the money to have them in a daily driver lite touring setup?  When I say lite, I mean short time wise, not ascent or aggressiveness.   

post #139 of 146

I've only toured on them a few times so far, but I've been pretty happy with them both at the resort and away.  They feel as solid as any other binding when skiing in bounds / busting through chop, etc.

post #140 of 146
Agree with Jay. Feels strong stepping in and skis well on and off piste. Hike is relatively heavy but smooth. Half wish there was a second hike bar, but the one there has worked on every step. The heel has released when needed on some over the handles. Simple pole flickery and stomp.
post #141 of 146

I used a pair of Adrenalines in Gulmarg and my guide had the Solomons.  Both worked ok, although the snow does get compacted between the binding and ski and reqiored removing the ski to close the binding.

post #142 of 146

I have heard ot5her peeps complain about the absence of the second heel lifter.  Does the Tyrolia have 2?

post #143 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by EasideSoulSkier View Post

I have heard ot5her peeps complain about the absence of the second heel lifter.  Does the Tyrolia have 2?

Yes, one on each skicool.gif!

 

It has a multi position lifter similar to the Dukes.  The Solomons, on the other hand, is fixed to the ski.  I didn't have any issues with twist, but we didn't do a lot of significant sidehill.

 

Mike

post #144 of 146
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post
 

I am most likely going with a bindingfreedom.com plate and then Dynafit Radical FT's and a FKS.


Thread revival! How has this worked out for you? I guess you have Dynafit compatible boots?

post #145 of 146

Well a few guys I know skied the Adrenalin and shared Betaracer's views...so I bought Tyrolia's but never got to mount to ski, sitting in closet....

post #146 of 146

Funny how things change in four years.  My Technic Cochise are now strictly alpine boots and get very little use.  Most of the time is spent on DPS Waliers with Dynafit and Scarpa Maestrael.  As always, YMMV but more time earning turns and very little time in bounds and lift assisted means lite was right for my use.

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