New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

MTB Advice - Page 3

post #61 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post

I tested a Moots HT last year and at my skill level, I found the lack of suspension and super lightness made the bike twitchy and harder to control on bumpier more technical sections. 

 

 

honestly my arguement has always been with the exception of really smooth (ie like literally nothing on the trail and not bumpy) trail that suspension is faster. Finn part of the twitchiness was also the geo of that bike which is alot quicker than your Ibis is.

 

http://app.strava.com/activities/54621655#993769187

 

I am not sure you can see this. but this a local loop in a larger trail system in Pittsburgh. its a 2.2 mile XC loop 90 percent singletrack. I know the trail very well and it short enough that I can sustain 100 percent effort all the ways though.

 

My fastest time is 12:31 on my Anthem  X, my next 2 fastest times are on the Anthem X as well at 12:47 and 13:43. The 13:43 time I know I was not trying as hard but the 2 12 minutes times are basically 100 percent effort with out many mistake.  Yesterday I got my hardtail back running I go up with the purpose of seeing what is faster in as controlled of enviroment as I can get.  No mistakes and my time is 13:48. So basically flat out on my hardtail and I am slightly slower than cruising on my FS, and one minute slower than crushing it on the FS. 

 

This trail is literally one of the easiest trails in the pittsburgh area. but there are ton of little bumps,roots, log crossing on dips that make it tough for the hardtail to put power down. My limiting factor in most trails is traction both during turns and putting power down. FS helps both of those help quite a bit.

 

crappy video of the trails on this little loop. Looks buff and mellow right? you would think a hardtail would be faster right?

 

 

so why do I still own a hardtail? because its different and its fun and generally my SS hardtail is alot more reliable than FS geared bike. It makes me faster but it is no means faster.

post #62 of 77

Josh, yeah, that is true for sure but when saddle hovering, I had an issue with the rear end banging the crap out of my ass(now there's a visual) and not following the line. Seemed to loose energy and got off-tracked easily by not maintaining contact with the ground. I am sure this is due to rider style and skill to an extent but it felt too light. I prefer the more damp and solid feel. Kinda like ski's. 

post #63 of 77

Looks like a fun trail, Josh.

 

+1 on 29er's being faster on more technical climbs.  It's definitely the case for me, anyway, although if you stop I do notice the extra bit of effort needed to get going again.

post #64 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

Looks like a fun trail, Josh.

 

+1 on 29er's being faster on more technical climbs.  It's definitely the case for me, anyway, although if you stop I do notice the extra bit of effort needed to get going again.

 

yeah both of my bikes are 29er and the my point is the FS 29er is faster even on non technical trails like the one shown in the video.

post #65 of 77

Those price tags make me laugh and cry.  Some words of wisdom: Pink Bike, Craigslist, Ebay and a little elbow grease. Those $6k bikes can be had for pennies on the dollar in couple of years. Someone always has to have the latest and greatest and its not me. 

post #66 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post

 

yeah both of my bikes are 29er and the my point is the FS 29er is faster even on non technical trails like the one shown in the video.

 

I don't have enough experience yet to say if the FS helps speed (I'll take your word for it), but after a month on my first FS bike and it's so good I can't believe I didn't get one sooner.  Jumps, bumps and rocky terrain = so much better.

post #67 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

 

I don't have enough experience yet to say if the FS helps speed (I'll take your word for it), but after a month on my first FS bike and it's so good I can't believe I didn't get one sooner.  Jumps, bumps and rocky terrain = so much better.

 

 

alot of misguided advice is to get a hardtail first......

 

if you have the money get the nicest FS you can buy.

post #68 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Matta View Post

 

 

alot of misguided advice is to get a hardtail first......

 

if you have the money get the nicest FS you can buy.

 

Yes.  I had a pretty out-dated bike and some people telling me to get a nice hard tail, but then a good friend of mine who I trust told me to stop screwing around if I'm serious and to get a FS.  It turned out to be great advice.  Now I need to get in better shape.  Ski touring doesn't have a thing on a serious uphill mtb climb.

post #69 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayT View Post

 

Yes.  I had a pretty out-dated bike and some people telling me to get a nice hard tail, but then a good friend of mine who I trust told me to stop screwing around if I'm serious and to get a FS.  It turned out to be great advice.  Now I need to get in better shape.  Ski touring doesn't have a thing on a serious uphill mtb climb.

 

 

funny I think ski touring is way harder than MTBing...

post #70 of 77
Thread Starter 

All good stuff guys.  This year is entirely different than last year for me.  I put a lot of time into learn good technique and timining.  I put it  together enough to achive a new level of flow and believe I made the right choices.  My speed is no increasing and I am having a blast mountain biking about 4-5 days a week.

 

Much of last year was spent chasing what I wanted from mountain biking.  I found myself liking 29er bikes more than 26er's, a slightly larger frame size, fatter tires and clip in setups.  I was all set to order a Scott scale 930,  a base model carbon bike when one of my skiing buds sat me down for a talk. 

 

The talk was basically the fact that I was about to make a big mistake that I might never even realize.  His words to me were " Everything about 29ers. larger sizes, fatter tires and clip in pedals is against everything that you are. I want to see you mountain bike like you ski and that is not going to happen with your choice of bikes". "What have you always preached? Dynamic balance and true flow is NOT STABILITY, IT'S BORN FROM INSTABILITY. You are a touchy feely zenny skier with way more than your fair share of dynamic flow."  "You should be on a weight weanny twitchy 26"carbon flickable bike with a small cockpit, flat pedals and freeride shoes. Better yet on a 24" high end crusier and no G@dn water bottle holder".  "Yeah, your going to suck a lot worse for a while and maybe even think you made the wrong choice but people like you need a kick in the teeth.  While your suckin, just think, this ain't stability it's dynamic."

 

I hated everything he said.  My thoughts were "Well  Fk you too and the horse your rode in on.  What the hell do you know about what I want"  I hated it because deep down inside I knew it was all true and it meant way more work and all the sucky beginner feelings that go with it.  For certain, way more work than I wanted do.  I suddenly felt old and incapable yet pissed, determined and obssesed.  I compromized and picked up a 26" carbon S works Stumpy FSR. I have it down under 24 lbs with S works Fast Trak race tires.  I have a pair of light weight cheap flat pedals and 5-10 Freeride soft soled shoes.  The cockpit is 2.5 inches shorter than I was going to order.   Damned twitchy compared to anything else I had ever ridden, especially slow techical uphill.

 

I sort of decided to live by the commandment "Thou shalt not un-necessesarily do anything that interupts the flow of the center of mass in any one of three dimensions".  That includes un-necessary movements that involve inertia around the center of mass. 

 

It's paying off big time.  My bike is down for a week or so and I took the old heavy entry level hard tail out today.  It felt stable, fast, safe, surefooted, sluggish and lifeless.  I felt like a pro----but the zen sucked big time.

post #71 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pierre View Post

All good stuff guys.  This year is entirely different than last year for me.  I put a lot of time into learn good technique and timining.  I put it  together enough to achive a new level of flow and believe I made the right choices.  My speed is no increasing and I am having a blast mountain biking about 4-5 days a week.

 

Much of last year was spent chasing what I wanted from mountain biking.  I found myself liking 29er bikes more than 26er's, a slightly larger frame size, fatter tires and clip in setups.  I was all set to order a Scott scale 930,  a base model carbon bike when one of my skiing buds sat me down for a talk. 

 

The talk was basically the fact that I was about to make a big mistake that I might never even realize.  His words to me were " Everything about 29ers. larger sizes, fatter tires and clip in pedals is against everything that you are. I want to see you mountain bike like you ski and that is not going to happen with your choice of bikes". "What have you always preached? Dynamic balance and true flow is NOT STABILITY, IT'S BORN FROM INSTABILITY. You are a touchy feely zenny skier with way more than your fair share of dynamic flow."  "You should be on a weight weanny twitchy 26"carbon flickable bike with a small cockpit, flat pedals and freeride shoes. Better yet on a 24" high end crusier and no G@dn water bottle holder".  "Yeah, your going to suck a lot worse for a while and maybe even think you made the wrong choice but people like you need a kick in the teeth.  While your suckin, just think, this ain't stability it's dynamic."

 

I hated everything he said.  My thoughts were "Well  Fk you too and the horse your rode in on.  What the hell do you know about what I want"  I hated it because deep down inside I knew it was all true and it meant way more work and all the sucky beginner feelings that go with it.  For certain, way more work than I wanted do.  I suddenly felt old and incapable yet pissed, determined and obssesed.  I compromized and picked up a 26" carbon S works Stumpy FSR. I have it down under 24 lbs with S works Fast Trak race tires.  I have a pair of light weight cheap flat pedals and 5-10 Freeride soft soled shoes.  The cockpit is 2.5 inches shorter than I was going to order.   Damned twitchy compared to anything else I had ever ridden, especially slow techical uphill.

 

I sort of decided to live by the commandment "Thou shalt not un-necessesarily do anything that interupts the flow of the center of mass in any one of three dimensions".  That includes un-necessary movements that involve inertia around the center of mass. 

 

It's paying off big time.  My bike is down for a week or so and I took the old heavy entry level hard tail out today.  It felt stable, fast, safe, surefooted, sluggish and lifeless.  I felt like a pro----but the zen sucked big time.

 

 

honestly wtf are you smoking? I am sure many people on here would love the same drugs....

 

Fla

post #72 of 77

Your skiing bud is laughing his ass off at you right now... I'm really surprised he didn't push it a bit farther and talk you into a mt unicycle.

post #73 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pierre View Post

All good stuff guys.  This year is entirely different than last year for me.  I put a lot of time into learn good technique and timining.  I put it  together enough to achive a new level of flow and believe I made the right choices.  My speed is no increasing and I am having a blast mountain biking about 4-5 days a week.

 

Much of last year was spent chasing what I wanted from mountain biking.  I found myself liking 29er bikes more than 26er's, a slightly larger frame size, fatter tires and clip in setups.  I was all set to order a Scott scale 930,  a base model carbon bike when one of my skiing buds sat me down for a talk. 

 

The talk was basically the fact that I was about to make a big mistake that I might never even realize.  His words to me were " Everything about 29ers. larger sizes, fatter tires and clip in pedals is against everything that you are. I want to see you mountain bike like you ski and that is not going to happen with your choice of bikes". "What have you always preached? Dynamic balance and true flow is NOT STABILITY, IT'S BORN FROM INSTABILITY. You are a touchy feely zenny skier with way more than your fair share of dynamic flow."  "You should be on a weight weanny twitchy 26"carbon flickable bike with a small cockpit, flat pedals and freeride shoes. Better yet on a 24" high end crusier and no G@dn water bottle holder".  "Yeah, your going to suck a lot worse for a while and maybe even think you made the wrong choice but people like you need a kick in the teeth.  While your suckin, just think, this ain't stability it's dynamic."

 

I hated everything he said.  My thoughts were "Well  Fk you too and the horse your rode in on.  What the hell do you know about what I want"  I hated it because deep down inside I knew it was all true and it meant way more work and all the sucky beginner feelings that go with it.  For certain, way more work than I wanted do.  I suddenly felt old and incapable yet pissed, determined and obssesed.  I compromized and picked up a 26" carbon S works Stumpy FSR. I have it down under 24 lbs with S works Fast Trak race tires.  I have a pair of light weight cheap flat pedals and 5-10 Freeride soft soled shoes.  The cockpit is 2.5 inches shorter than I was going to order.   Damned twitchy compared to anything else I had ever ridden, especially slow techical uphill.

 

I sort of decided to live by the commandment "Thou shalt not un-necessesarily do anything that interupts the flow of the center of mass in any one of three dimensions".  That includes un-necessary movements that involve inertia around the center of mass. 

 

It's paying off big time.  My bike is down for a week or so and I took the old heavy entry level hard tail out today.  It felt stable, fast, safe, surefooted, sluggish and lifeless.  I felt like a pro----but the zen sucked big time.

 

ROTF.gif

post #74 of 77

The OP's got me freaked out about my zen.  I was finally going to get a 29er... but I'm already hurting for zen since I stopped skiing straight skis.  If I get a 650b will I only lose half as much zen as a 29er?

post #75 of 77
Quote:
Originally Posted by tball View Post

The OP's got me freaked out about my zen.  I was finally going to get a 29er... but I'm already hurting for zen since I stopped skiing straight skis.  If I get a 650b will I only lose half as much zen as a 29er?

 

due ride a BMX bike on singletrack I am sure its zenful......

post #76 of 77

I wonder where a 24" hucker bike fits on the Zen-scale.

 

 

Actually, I think I get where Pierre is coming from. He was on the path to getting a lycra-leg-shavers bike and was steered toward something a bit closer to "all-mountain" or whatever. Respect for keeping it real with the 26" wheels!

post #77 of 77

Curtis Inglis from Retrotech built a 24" wheeled rigid bike he named the 'humiliator'. That sounds zen-ful....

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cycling