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What skis should I bring to when I move to DC?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

Hey All,

 

I've been fairly absent around the forums for the last couple months for a bunch of reasons, but mostly because I wasn't sure where my skiing future was going.  I'm going to continuing my education next year (got to get smarter so that I can get a good job so that I will have more money to spend on ski stuff) and was unsure where I was going for that.  Anyways I've now finalized my decision and will be headed to DC.  I obviously won't get to ski my usual 40 days, but I'll be skiing a bit in Pennsylvania off and on.  So my question-- what skis should I bring?  My current quiver right now is Fischer RC4 SL 165cm, Dynastar WC GS 175cm, Volkl WC GS 180cm, and Blizzard M-Power 176cm.  I'll only be able to bring one, but if you guys think that there's a better ski out there for that stuff I'll be skiing I would definitely consider getting something new.  

 

Thanks for any help!

 

PS:  The other 3 or 4 skis I decide not to bring are going to be up for sale/trade.  Shoot me a PM if interested.

post #2 of 17

I'm not sure about the joints closer to DC, but Wintergreen VA has a tasty 1k drop hill that can be pretty good skiing on weekdays when things aren't too crowded.

 

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As for PA, Blue Knob is pretty good when Extrovert and the glades are open later in the season.  I'd only bring 1-2 pairs of skis over 90mm underfoot.  Anything else would be quite useful at the places I'm familiar with out this way.   If you must limit it to one pair I'd go GS.  Your

SL would be OK on the November WROD, Christmas break, of Presidents Day super crowded days.

post #3 of 17

Bring your ice carver.  Is this it:  Fischer RC4 SL 165cm?  If that's the only ski you bring you might invoke Murphy's Law and experience something better than our typical frozen granular/hardpacksmile.gif

Check out www.DCSki.com for detailed info on mid-Atlantic skiing.  Many are surprised to learn that there are a dozen ski areas within 3 hours of DC and two within about 80 minutes.  There are a number of good ski hills in the area, but some of my favs in a nutshell:  Whitetail, PA (80 mins) has a HSQ serving 1000' vertical with decent continuous upper intermediate pitch, including one run left to bump-up, often crowded on prime weekends.  As crgildart mentioned, Blue Knob, PA (3 hrs and also ~1000' vert) gets the most gnar points for the very steep Extrovert trail and some challenging glades (require natural snow, lucky if the glades are decent for about 3 weeks a winter).  Timberline, WV is about 3 hrs and also has 1000' vert, some nice glades with better chance of natural base than BK, and usually one bump run.  

 

The economy is very strong in DC area and barely skipped a beat during the recession.  Beware, you might find a great job here after school and have to stay in the area and get used to our smaller, greener hills.th_dunno-1[1].gif

 

PS:  about halfway down the page in this thread is a collection of some of my favorite shots of epicskiers at Blue Knob, PA from a couple years ago:

http://www.epicski.com/t/94144/swift-silent-deep-dvd-trip-report-contest-the-jackson-hole-air-force/30

post #4 of 17

My favorite area to ski in the Washington area is Canaan Valley/Timberline in West Virginia.  It is just over a three-hour drive from DC.  I usually make a day trip of it, leaving around 6:00AM and returning around 8:00PM.  Canaan and Timberline are two separate ski areas about 3-4 miles apart in the Canaan Valley. The valley floor is 3,200 ft elevation, and it is known as the West Virginia snow bowl.  Average snowfall is about 150+ in./year.  At that elevation you get far fewer freeze/thaw cycles than other ski areas in the mid-Atlantic.

 

I have had a good many powder days there, unusual for the mid-Atlantic.  

 

Each resort has about 35 runs, but that is misleading because a number of those are little cut-thrus. Timberline is a bit steeper/more challenging.   Both have slow lifts and not the best managed, in my opinion, but I don't care on days when they get 20in of snow.

 

Here are the links.

 

http://canaanresort.com/winter/

 

http://www.timberlineresort.com/winter/     .  

 

A long-winded way of saying you might want to bring  a pair that has some flotation.  Even though most ski days around DC will be hardpack and icy on man-made snow, it's not unheard of to have a nice dump in West Virginia.

 

 

 

post #5 of 17
Thread Starter 

So two votes for wide skis and one for ice carver... haha this is quite confusing!  Chance are I'll be sticking to the closer hills (less than 2 hours away) so I don't know if that makes a difference.

 

James, I'll probably stay in DC after school but obviously that depends on having a job and such.  On a positive note I was down there on Friday and stopped by Ski Center to play with the Fischer Vacuums and they told me to come back if I needed a job next season-- which really just means I'll have more money to spend on skis rolleyes.gif

post #6 of 17

Of all in your quiver, at the southern edge of Eastern skiing, I would keep the SL's as the best daily driver. Only you know if you would be happy on them for a full day as they are not universally loved. Fast enough for most and will make you work on technique. Second pick would be the M Power if you are into cruising and it gives some versatility should you go elsewhere. Powder has a half-life of about an hour at a small hill.

 

Small hills don't need serious or wannabe GS racers trying to avoid crowds at 40 mph.

post #7 of 17

Living in DC, you will spend some time in the South Central PA areas - whitetail, liberty, and roundtop.  My suggestion ski what you like most on hardpack and mainly man-made snow, whatever ski is the most fun to ski pack those. Smile and enjoy the day.

 

post #8 of 17

For within 2 hours, Whitetail, Roundtop and Liberty are the main choices. Depending on where you live in the area, Wisp may be reachable. Whitetail and Roundtop are acceptable areas for skiing. Liberty is really minimal in terms of challenge plus most crowded (when I lived in DC I was there only once despite it being closest). I have skied a fair amount at Roundtop. Roundtop has a Nastar course and has one or two races a year. ASRA runs both a GS and SL there. There is also a southern masters group but I don't know their schedule. I would suggest whichever ski you prefer for frozen man made. Unless you are going to WV you will not see much powder and, in the mid Atlantic, if they get new snow, they usually groom it down asap to preserve it. Frozen man made will be the most common condition.

post #9 of 17

having been a mid atlantic skier my whole life, I would reccomend either one of your slalom skis in the 165 lenght.  They would be the most versatile and fun skis on the frozen groomed granular that we often ski.  If you have any skills at all, they will also be fine with any dump we get short of our rare 12+ inchers. 

 

Your slalom skis will work very well in bumps and in the 165 length will do a decent job of cruising.  Pick the one you have that you feel is the most verstatle and forgiving and you will have fun in the Mid Atlantic.  Once you are here, there are lots of demo days at the local areas and you can try out something that would be more east coast friendly.  I would not reccomend anything wider than 90mm for every day use.  Personally I think my Volkl AC30's width a 124- 80-107  dimension is about the perfect width for an all mountain eastern ski.  Unfortunately the mfg's think everyone needs a 90+ ski even for the frozen tundra we call ski slopes around here.   Pretty soon the only skis that will be under 90mm underfoot will be beginner skis, race skis.or specialty bump skis.

 

Of course YMMV.

 

Ski on!

 

Rick G

 

 

post #10 of 17
Thread Starter 

So I'm hearing I should def not take the GS skis, and go with either the SL or M-Power.  What I decided on doing is put all 4 (plus a bunch of other ski stuff) up for sale and see what sells.  If all 4 sell I'll plan on getting a new ski next year in the 70-80 waist range-- maybe a Kastle RX or Blizzard G-Power if I can find one at the right price.  If either the SL or M-Power doesn't sell that's the one I'll take.  Worst case senario I hate it and sell it down there.  

 

Thanks for your help!

 

If you're interested in those or any other ski stuff, check out my positing here http://www.epicski.com/t/112191/the-racedude-will-no-longer-be-racing-race-and-recreational-ski-and-ski-accessory-sale

post #11 of 17

Sounds like a plan.  BTW, Ski Center has one of the best and highest attended ski swaps in the region every year in late Oct if you need to adjust your quiver.

post #12 of 17

Ski Chalet has good swaps also at their various stores.

post #13 of 17

FWIW, the swaps in question tend to cater to the $300-and-under-per-item market segment - do not expect to readily sell something that is $400+ish.   

 

Even if the price is fully justified, people won't know or care that it /is/ justified.

post #14 of 17

Dude,

 

It depends on what you're going to do. If you're going to ski every weekend on day trips, go with the SL skis. If you're only going to go out when there's fresh snow or slush skiing, the Dynastars would be fine. If you're only going to ski Timberline/Canaan/Snowshoe/Wisp in freshies go with Volkl.

 

Most DC skiers that stay local pick their home resort based on what side of town they live on.  If you go to a MD school, you'll probably end up at RoundTop or Whitetail. If you go to a VA school, you'l probably end up at Wintergreen or Massanutten. If you go to school in the city, between school and the traffic I doubt you'll be skiing every weekend so my recommendation would be to try all of the area resorts as you can.

 

If you make it to Whitetail, look me up. I'm there on the weekends.

post #15 of 17

The swaps in DC are a much better place to buy than to sell.
 

post #16 of 17

They also groom quickly because the rank and file skiers complain about the powder. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by vsirin View Post

For within 2 hours, Whitetail, Roundtop and Liberty are the main choices. Depending on where you live in the area, Wisp may be reachable. Whitetail and Roundtop are acceptable areas for skiing. Liberty is really minimal in terms of challenge plus most crowded (when I lived in DC I was there only once despite it being closest). I have skied a fair amount at Roundtop. Roundtop has a Nastar course and has one or two races a year. ASRA runs both a GS and SL there. There is also a southern masters group but I don't know their schedule. I would suggest whichever ski you prefer for frozen man made. Unless you are going to WV you will not see much powder and, in the mid Atlantic, if they get new snow, they usually groom it down asap to preserve it. Frozen man made will be the most common condition.

post #17 of 17

I have now been living in the DC area for eek.gif 13 years!  I ski at 7 springs and they have NASTAR course just about every weekend.  You will definitely want a carver out here, something that will handle the ice once the wind starts blowing the man mad snow off the slopes and exposes the melted snow now frozen over.  I have loved it at 7 springs, but Timberline and Whitetail are also fun. Blue Knob gets very very icy but if there is a very good dump of snow then it can be fun.

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