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Canadian traffic law?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

I've recently heard that there's a law in Canada (maybe just a single province) that you can't let your vehicle idle for more than two minutes. Can't remote start your car in the morning and let it warm up, have to shut it down if you're motionless in traffic for too long, that kind of thing.

 

Can anyone confirm this? If it's true, how strongly is it enforced?

post #2 of 11

I live in Ontario and I have never heard of that.  In touristy areas you may occasionally see "no idle" zones to prevent all the fumes and such, but there is definitely no such law when driving (even if stuck in traffic).  If not marked while parked, idle away.

post #3 of 11

If you're in Toronto watch out for the idle police.  I believe idling is defined as stop leaving the vehicle running (traffic is excepted as are some other vehicles).

 

Ex Mayor David Miller bylaw.....couple of years old.

 

Yes even in Canada we have them Rules.gif unfortunately frown.gif

post #4 of 11

It may be a law in CA (California). We have lots of absurd laws here.

 

Pay the ticket if you're going to freeze (or boil in the desert heat) to death. But be careful - we lost some kids at Squaw last year to CO poisoning in the parking lot from running the car with poor ventilation. But the law is an air pollution overreaction - not a safety issue.

 

Eric

post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschoolskier View Post

If you're in Toronto watch out for the idle police....

 

Yep, there it is, Municipal Code Chapter 517: http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/municode/1184_517.pdf

Thanks for the feedback.

 

Are you aware of any buzz with folks wanting to have such laws applied more widely? I have a bit of a profesional interest.

post #6 of 11

Well hell, I have never heard of anyone getting a ticket for that.  The only ones I can think of is when couriers stop in the middle of the road to run in and drop a package ... police will nail those bastards.  But, average joe warming up there car in the morning won't be touched.

post #7 of 11
Thread Starter 

My interest requires me to deal with the law as written. Non-enforcement is irrelevant.

 

Since my OP I've gathered that there's actually a fair number of municipalities that have passed this kind of law.

post #8 of 11

Correct, these are simply by-laws (aka Ordinances to our American friends). As such, they are only local.  No "Canadian" law or overarching jurisdiction.  These idling by-laws are more common in urban areas, presumably to help prevent pollution where there are massive numbers of cars in dense areas.  Also secondarily to probably help prevent couriers from being arses, though that won't likely change.  As it relates to potential ski areas, these by-laws are very rare in rural areas, if at all. 

 

Enforcement (other than Toronto) is a whole other matter; there simply aren't enough enforcement officers to cover the larger areas.  Idling more than 2 minutes?  Prove it.  Have them show you the evidence.  Besides, you'll be long gone (or just shut off the vehicle quickly) if someone approaches with a big ticket dispenser in hand.

 

Perhaps well intentioned for certain urban areas, but really quite bogus and toothless in practice.  One of those types of things. Nothing to worry about really.

post #9 of 11

I once lived in an American city where it was against City Ordinance to leave your vehicle running while unoccupied.

That was to prevent thievery, though, not anything to do with pollution.

post #10 of 11

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by chilehed View Post

 

 

Yep, there it is, Municipal Code Chapter 517: http://www.toronto.ca/legdocs/municode/1184_517.pdf

Thanks for the feedback.

 

Are you aware of any buzz with folks wanting to have such laws applied more widely? I have a bit of a profesional interest.

 

It is followed by other cities to see what happens in Toronto.  If its effective it will likely get applied elsewhere.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnerbob View Post

Correct, these are simply by-laws (aka Ordinances to our American friends). As such, they are only local.  No "Canadian" law or overarching jurisdiction.  These idling by-laws are more common in urban areas, presumably to help prevent pollution where there are massive numbers of cars in dense areas.  Also secondarily to probably help prevent couriers from being arses, though that won't likely change.  As it relates to potential ski areas, these by-laws are very rare in rural areas, if at all. 

 

Enforcement (other than Toronto) is a whole other matter; there simply aren't enough enforcement officers to cover the larger areas.  Idling more than 2 minutes?  Prove it.  Have them show you the evidence.  Besides, you'll be long gone (or just shut off the vehicle quickly) if someone approaches with a big ticket dispenser in hand.

 

Perhaps well intentioned for certain urban areas, but really quite bogus and toothless in practice.  One of those types of things. Nothing to worry about really.

 

The Days of primary inforcement are ussually during high smog alert days, at which time they will ticket you (you get a warning on the radio/tv).  Otherwise it is ticket of convenience, because its a slow day rolleyes.gif.  Exceptions include: work vehicles, police, taxi, health issues so on I believe.

 

 

post #11 of 11
Thread Starter 

Quote:

Originally Posted by oldschoolskier View Post

It is followed by other cities to see what happens in Toronto.  If its effective it will likely get applied elsewhere.

 

The Days of primary inforcement are ussually during high smog alert days, at which time they will ticket you (you get a warning on the radio/tv).  Otherwise it is ticket of convenience, because its a slow day rolleyes.gif.  Exceptions include: work vehicles, police, taxi, health issues so on I believe.

 

I figured as much, but want to make sure I really understand what's going on.

 

Auto manufacturers operate under certain government regulatory requirements, and need to met those requirements while ensuring (among other things) customer satisfaction and avoiding unnecessary cost. To do that it helps to understand how customers behave, the regulations that drive that behavior (such as "thou shalt not idle your vehicle") and a bit of forecasting with regard to how things might develop in the future.

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