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Can somebody tell me which of these skis I should get (or if I shouldn't)? - Page 4

post #91 of 107

There are some skis that are somewhat "vintage" that would also work well for you. The Dynastar 4800 of 3-4 years ago would be a fine ski for someone starting out. No doubt there are many people here who have some pre-owned gear available for a fraction of new price (like $100 including bindings), that would be fully adequate for your needs. Try a "wanted to buy" ad and see what comes in.

post #92 of 107

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ferrari353 View Post

Oh also, I found my mom's old 80's skis in the garage a while back but epicski people said they're too old, but they have poles with them.  The poles don't have a wrist strap, they have something like a pirate's sword's hand guard...I don't really know how to explain it...but is there anything wrong with those?

 

If there's a gap in the hand-guard, what you have there are strapless poles, which are fine.  Like Mfa81 said above, many people don't use straps anyway...I don't.

 

As long as they're not bent or kinked and are the right length, those should be fine.  Turn 'em upside down and grip them immediately below the basket.  If your forearm is parallel to the floor, they're the right size.  A tad short is probably better than too long.  If they're way off, just pick some up at a swap, garage sale, clearance rack, or some other cheap place.

post #93 of 107

I still use my strapless Reflex poles from the early-mid '80's.  

post #94 of 107
Thread Starter 

I don't like straps.  And the last time I went skiing, I didn't fall all that much.  The only times I fell were when I started going too fast and I couldn't slow down so I fell over on purpose and at the end of some of the boxes when I would fall backwards because I lost my balance.

post #95 of 107

The realskiers subscription is worth the $20.

Just make sure the poles are not too long.

 

I don't use pole straps.  The sabre grip was discontinued because of claimed increase risk of shoulder injury when the poles didn't detach from the death grip of the skier.  I don't know how much truth there is to the claim. I was using sabre grip Scott poles when I broke my wrist, but it probably would have ended up broken with any aluminum or steel pole; my shoulder was fine.th_dunno-1[1].gif

post #96 of 107

Summer and fall are good times to get good deals on skis. Used skis of good quality would be an affordable option to paying much higher prices on less worthy new  gear. Just choose wisely and get stuff that is lightly used . lot's of people take good care of their gear and unload it for a million reasons. Be patient.

 In the Fall ski swaps are good places to get cheap deals  and they often support a local ski club or patrol which helps another. People also move more gear when they gear up for the upcoming season and want to pay for new toys.

post #97 of 107

^^^ Will amend this to say, "late spring" and "late summer, early fall." By June, most desirable lengths or models of skis are gone if the price is good, and the year's highest prices occur in mid-fall to early winter as folks get psyched for the coming season. You can sometimes find stuff in late August through September that's leftover from the previous season but was held at a higher price the previous spring. 

post #98 of 107
Thread Starter 

Where are ski swaps usually located?  Like up by the mountain?

post #99 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ferrari353 View Post

Where are ski swaps usually located?  Like up by the mountain?

 

Yes - or adjacent a sponsoring ski shop.

post #100 of 107
Thread Starter 

How do I find them?

post #101 of 107

They are usually promoted in Sept /Early fall . Check your local hills on their websites lat the end of summer. There are often other sales in bigger cities that the larger stores offer trying to liquidate older stock  at steep discounts. 

post #102 of 107

I'll throw in 2cents here and say at least for skis you can go back to the internet and look for some used demo deals on skis; especially as the season is winding up.

There's a subforum here for that too.

 

 
Like from this post the Smoke for $280 i think would be a nice ski for you.

Other sources-powder7.com or ebay;  but you need to have some idea of the ski you want.

 

Poles are not too expensive, you can pick up any pair that is the right length for you anywhere, just don't spend too much.  Online is fine too once you know your length.

 

I'm sure it's already been mentioned but boots is a place not to go cheap on and you got to choose wisely and find something that fits your foot.

 

 

If you have the opportunity to go up, hopefully you can also get some tips or lessons either from friends or self-learning from stuff you found on the internet or whatever.  This is where you can focus to increase your fun factor the most.  Once you improve your abilities, you're going to want newer equipment, so don't get too invested in the skis you get (either buying too advanced skis thinking you'll grow into it; or spending too much on brand new skis).  Having some used skis will also make you worry less when you get some dings and scratches in them.

It is like first learning to drive car (which I suppose you may just be going through too).  Nobody gets a ferrari as their first car, they get a hand-me-down used car that's easier to drive and maybe has some character dents.

 

At the same time, skiing is an expensive sport.  

You'll also see that things like lunch/gas/lodging and things of that nature will start making up a lot of your budget more than the skis.

For me, there are two things to take away from this.

 

1) the area to save more money is on these other things than equipment.  If you're already down to $300 for skis, how much lower can you expect to get?  Packing your own lunch and water instead of soda and things like that will quickly save you more money then going too cheap on equipment.

2) If you spend a little more on equipment, you can get a lot of return on your investment.  So if you spent $500 on equipment instead of $400. Maybe overall your trips cost 15% more; but maybe you got 50% more enjoyment, then that's money well spent there.

post #103 of 107
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by raytseng View Post

I'll throw in 2cents here and say at least for skis you can go back to the internet and look for some used demo deals on skis; especially as the season is winding up.

There's a subforum here for that too.

 

 
Like from this post the Smoke for $280 i think would be a nice ski for you.

Other sources-powder7.com or ebay;  but you need to have some idea of the ski you want.

 

Poles are not too expensive, you can pick up any pair that is the right length for you anywhere, just don't spend too much.  Online is fine too once you know your length.

 

I'm sure it's already been mentioned but boots is a place not to go cheap on and you got to choose wisely and find something that fits your foot.

 

 

If you have the opportunity to go up, hopefully you can also get some tips or lessons either from friends or self-learning from stuff you found on the internet or whatever.  This is where you can focus to increase your fun factor the most.  Once you improve your abilities, you're going to want newer equipment, so don't get too invested in the skis you get (either buying too advanced skis thinking you'll grow into it; or spending too much on brand new skis).  Having some used skis will also make you worry less when you get some dings and scratches in them.

It is like first learning to drive car (which I suppose you may just be going through too).  Nobody gets a ferrari as their first car, they get a hand-me-down used car that's easier to drive and maybe has some character dents.

 

At the same time, skiing is an expensive sport.  

You'll also see that things like lunch/gas/lodging and things of that nature will start making up a lot of your budget more than the skis.

For me, there are two things to take away from this.

 

1) the area to save more money is on these other things than equipment.  If you're already down to $300 for skis, how much lower can you expect to get?  Packing your own lunch and water instead of soda and things like that will quickly save you more money then going too cheap on equipment.

2) If you spend a little more on equipment, you can get a lot of return on your investment.  So if you spent $500 on equipment instead of $400. Maybe overall your trips cost 15% more; but maybe you got 50% more enjoyment, then that's money well spent there.

The first time I went skiing, I took a beginner's lesson at the mountain. And I've already gotten boots. I'm planning on waiting a little while until I start making money from my summer job to buy skis. And the under $10 I spend on food isn't that important to me.

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post #104 of 107

Ferrari353,

 

Reytseng is correct in the advice he is giving.  The $10 I spend on food is important to me and it is likely to most expensive portion of skiing as it give the least return (most of the food you get t the hill isn't that good for you).

 

Think of it this way 6 lunches = 1 more day skiing.

 

Spend the money were it counts.

 

Oldschoolskier

post #105 of 107
Thread Starter 

I'm getting a season pass anyway (which I was told is only $200 if you buy it extremely early before the season).  They have pretty good chili (and other soups) at the mountain I go to for like $6 or something so I just get that and I'm happy.  It tastes good and it keeps me warm...What more can I ask for? :)  If it starts getting too expensive, then I might start bringing a lunch though.

post #106 of 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ferrari353 View Post

I'm getting a season pass anyway (which I was told is only $200 if you buy it extremely early before the season).

You better keep your eyes open... Best deals on next season's pass should be available right now!

Most of the resort are selling their 2012/2013 passes around this timeframe late season/spring and the best deals are usually before the resorts close!
post #107 of 107

From TGR Gear swap- Dynastar Legend 4800s, 172 cm, w/ NX11 fluid bindings. One small core shot, otherwise 7.5/10. $125 + shipping.

 

Great less-than-uber gnar-gnar ski, should last you for a few seasons  - Look for "Rossi Turntable...." on the header line

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