New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Skiing & College - Page 2

post #31 of 55

This is my plan: Go to university (possibly the new whistler university), and get a tourism management degree. Then, move to whistler, and get a job in the sales/ marketing department. Then you get a free pass, and live in whistler, and marketing makes some decent money from what I hear. Basically, be a sophisticated ski bum. smile.gif

post #32 of 55

Im also a mechanical engineering student right now.  My advice would be to just study what you enjoy.  If your into skiing that much youll find the time to do it no matter what you study.  You can always take a year or two off after you graduate and ski bum for a while.

 

You can definitely ski a ton and not get behind in your classes.  Just load up on classes in the fall semester and work your ass off. Then take less classes in the spring semester and make your schedule based around skiing. I made it so I got out by 1030 three times a week.  Made one or two of those work days and headed to the mountain the others.
 

post #33 of 55

You have tons of free time in college. I waste most of it and still ski 60 days a year at a mountain that's a 5 hour drive from school (plus I didn't even have a car the first two years). If you want to go skiing and are within driving distance, you'll be able to do so plenty.

post #34 of 55

Duke - Congratulations on your decision.  I think it is a good choice. There is plenty of time to go to a "more prestigious" institution later.  I took the scholarship route as an undergrad, worked hard because I liked it (and played plenty too), then went to a fancier institution for grad school without having to pay.  The higher level studies are where the schools distinguish themselves anyway. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Duke2320 View Post

 

Rolfe, trying to earn as much money to save while still single and living pretty inexpensively in order to build up a good amount of money to invest and live mainly off of the interest from that sounds like a pretty good plan to me.  What kind of investments?

 

 

 

I wish there were a simple answer, I'd be doing it myself.  At least there are a few simple things to remember

 

  1. Don't get yourself financially trapped.  As NaySayer pointed out, this is easy to do.  Big student loans are a great way to start and excess consumption (nice car, big house, etc.) will pound the nails in the coffin.  Save, don't spend.  This doesn't mean you're pining away for retirement.  Most of the world lives on far less than we do, and we don't have a monopoly on happiness.  
  2. Don't invest in anything until you have a solid cushion of cash. 6 months living expenses is reasonable.  If you work in some industries you may want more.
  3. There is no free lunch.  If someone offers you one, run.
  4. Don't invest in anything you don't understand.  That will keep you away from those free lunches too.
  5. Minimize fees of any sort.  Return on investment is fickle, but fees are a guaranteed loss.

 

Learn about the different investment options out there -- stocks, bonds, ETFs, CDs, futures, options, and more -- but don't put money in everything you read about.  Futures and options can wipe you out fast (and are often sold to you as an easy path to riches). I usually stick to stocks, but I'm always shopping for alternatives.

 

Good luck, and enjoy WWU!

post #35 of 55

I was as unsure of my true calling as the OP when I was 16, and end up doing a a degree that I don't use any more.

 

Instead, I'm now in a career I absolutely LOVE. And it just happens to have a huge amount of flexibility. Oh yes, it pays pretty well too. :)

 

The key, when I look back, was the transition being absolutely painless. After all, my education was not wasted. It was a very broad based education, the sort of education that broadens one's mind and lays the foundation for whatever career one later embark on.

 

Our world is a fast changing one. What's a good career today may or may not be the same by the time you graduate, or before your retirement. And there will be new career that doesn't exist today yet.

 

So, whatever major you decide on, try to get as broad an education as you can. It may come in handy later in your life.

 

 

post #36 of 55

ive not read the posts of any one else, but i wish before i started working i took the time out to ski a whole season bar job sort of thing and bumming it, once you get older the chance never comes back. bills morgages family commitments,

post #37 of 55

Agree with rossymcg. One year off would not change anything. You don't realize how valuable time is until it becomes very limited. I still make it sking quite a bit, but fantasize about having a period of months to do what I want. For many, having a period of time like that is possible when young and then not again until retirement.   

post #38 of 55

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Duke2320 View Post

I have made my decision! I will be attending Western Washington University next year, and I will also be participating in their Honors program. The student body there seems to have similar interests to me, and the smaller class sizes will also suit me better than UW. I'm exited to see what next year brings, I know it's going to be a great experience!

DouglySkiRight- Thank you for the words of encouragement! I'm going to be keeping an open mind in all my classes to see what I enjoy, I think that that will give me a better sense of what I want to do. I am however thinking that a more linguistic career may be what I will eventually end up doing as I do feel like I am more suited for that kind of work, and I like it more in general.

 

Woo-hoo! ... echoing your enthusiasm. Small classes are GREAT. My average class size in college was 15-20... real teaching, real learning.

 

Like mustski I also changed career tracks... at 50! After college I spent 25 years in business roles that emphasized quantitative thinking. Purchasing, Sourcing, Inventory Management, Asset Management, D-base development, etc.... all very numbers-driven. I'm fully competent at that (taught myself statistics and calculus at 30 because I needed it for work) but I don't LOVE it.

 

What I do love is reading and writing (thus the endless blahblahblah here and elsewhere, lol). Finding myself merged out of a job at 50 I looked around and, partly by planning, partly by luck, found a position as a Legal Contracts Specialist. Yes, I read, write, edit and negotiate that fine print most people hate and never read. I live in it and love it. I'm negotiating multi-million dollar contracts for a multi-national, earning twice what I did in roles I enjoyed less... and enjoy going to work in the morning. I'd have done far better if I'd figured it out at 30 and gone to law school, oh well.

 

I have no magic formula for finding what YOU love (obviously, it took me a long time) but I do know how important it is not to get stuck in a rut.

 

Have a blast, and ski a little too. :)

 

post #39 of 55

Here is a WWU skier hint.  Schedule as many of your classes in the afternoon as possible.  I see lots of students at Mt. Baker for the first hour or two of the day on weekdays slaying the powder and then they disappear.  I've heard them mention about how they need to get back to town to catch some class or other.

 

Welcome to Western.  As an alum and a local resident that lives a block from the university, I can tell you that it's a great school in an even better place.

post #40 of 55

i'd like to go back to my advice I gave way back when, which is once you get there, find the Ski/Outdoors Club.  

They'll be your best source for advice.

 

 

post #41 of 55

Hmmm, careers that pay well and allow you to ski a lot???????????/

I can't speak to this from personal experience, not having made such great choices myself (the only time I ever found ample time to ski was as a ski instructor during the 4 years that I was more or less unemployed in the architectural profession due to recession) but I recall a skiing companion from the Air Force who used his Air Force flight training to move into a job as an air line pilot for Delta which allowed him to set himself up at Park City and concentrate on slalom racing. So I don't know if airline pilots are paid as well anymore, I suspect maybe not, but the pay has been traditionally pretty good and the number of hours allowed to actually fly amazingly low. I'm sure someone will step up and blow this rainbow away but it did sound like a good deal to me.

post #42 of 55
Thread Starter 
rossymcg and Maui Steve, I would love to be a ski bum for a season or something, but my parents unfortunately aren't too interested in that idea. I just sent in my final confirmation to Western, so I will definitely be attending there next year! Don't tempt me too much biggrin.gif

Thanks DouglySkiRight, I am definitely looking forward to smaller class sizes and finding what I love to do smile.gif

Posuane, good point about the schedule. I was also going to see if maybe I could work my classes around so most of the harder ones are in Fall/Spring quarters instead of Winter. Thanks for the welcome! We should get together and ski sometime next year.

raytseng, becoming a member of all skiing and outdoors clubs is one of the first things that I am going to look into. Western also has a program where groups of students go off somewhere outdoors for a week before school starts that I'm going to do to meet some people.

oison, an uncle of mine is a pilot. He does seem to have some good time off, but he often seems pretty tired when he does get home and definitely needs the rest.
post #43 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Duke2320 View Post

rossymcg and Maui Steve, I would love to be a ski bum for a season or something, but my parents unfortunately aren't too interested in that idea. I just sent in my final confirmation to Western, so I will definitely be attending there next year! Don't tempt me too much biggrin.gif

Exactly what my dad said to me "get yourself to work lad" which I did while a large group of friends went to oz for a year, now some 15 years later because I stayed in home and worked I'm no better off, in fact I'm worse because I never had that year living the dream that they did, we're now all doing well for ourselfs own business or working for ourselfs, I've missed my chance I'll encourage my kids to have a year or so out of the rat race to full fill their short lives with fun packed memories,
post #44 of 55

Finish your undergrad degree first.  Then consider taking the "ski bum" year.  Once you get started on your career, taking time off becomes very difficult. Unless you are offered an amazing job right out of university, there will be "no harm, no foul" in waiting a year to start your career.  I had plans for a ski bum year in Whistler with some friends.  Unfortunately a series of small disasters caused all three of them to bail on me.  I still regret that I just didn't go by myself.  I was too chicken!

post #45 of 55

I'm just about to end my first year of university and this has been a very informative read, particularly with regards to most of you being so damn cheerful about what you do, which has somehow soothed my cynical outlook on my own future. 

...just need to figure out how to emigrate to Canada... 

post #46 of 55

Most people who can afford the time to view a ski website are self-selected people who have a hobby that makes them happy.  

Unhappy people, skiers or otherwise, usually are not going to bother posting to a forum.  They're visiting/reading self-help/lifecoaching etc websites and books.  

There are plenty of people who are not exactly where they want to be; and there's a huge industry related to life and future; you aren't alone.

post #47 of 55

my brother thought skiing came first- took him 10 years to get his degree- he couldn't figure out why he couldn't get a good job- hum

post #48 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lukas View Post

I'm just about to end my first year of university and this has been a very informative read, particularly with regards to most of you being so damn cheerful about what you do, which has somehow soothed my cynical outlook on my own future. 

...just need to figure out how to emigrate to Canada... 

 

Marry a Canadian.

post #49 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by raytseng View Post

Most people who can afford the time to view a ski website are self-selected people who have a hobby that makes them happy.  

Unhappy people, skiers or otherwise, usually are not going to bother posting to a forum.  They're visiting/reading self-help/lifecoaching etc websites and books.  

 

 

or...

 

post #50 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by shadowdyn View Post

my brother thought skiing came first- took him 10 years to get his degree- he couldn't figure out why he couldn't get a good job- hum

bet he had a good 10 years though, 10 years of pure pleasure and fun

post #51 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by raytseng View Post

Most people who can afford the time to view a ski website are self-selected people who have a hobby that makes them happy.  

Unhappy people, skiers or otherwise, usually are not going to bother posting to a forum.  They're visiting/reading self-help/lifecoaching etc websites and books.  

There are plenty of people who are not exactly where they want to be; and there's a huge industry related to life and future; you aren't alone.

 

If I came across as depressed in any way that would be incorrect, I just have a "expect the worst and there's no way you can ever be sad" approach to many things. Works particularly well with skiing I find, lets you add 'not dying' to how well the day went ;) .



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DesiredUsername View Post

 

Marry a Canadian.


Epic could do with a forum dedicated to green card marriages into ski regions.


Actually, it turns out that doing a PHD (which I intend to do as anything besides academia would actually result in me having to work... with people!)  in Canada is one of the easier ways of attaining citizenship, might actually work. 



I can't see anything wrong with re-enacting platoon scenes with Mr. Sheen...

post #52 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by rossymcg View Post

bet he had a good 10 years though, 10 years of pure pleasure and fun

long ways coming and going from N Minn to Vail- seems he was in College forever- heading to become a teacher- was broke most of the time-

way it sometimes went is- I'm out here- can someone come and get me-

 

I went out a few times- back in those days it wasn't to hard to get work enough to ski and eat-

 

life just seemed a bit more important than ski bumming-

 

but yes- he did it his way- and to hear him tell- it was the best of times

 

course he did ring up quite a college bill- still paying the loans

post #53 of 55

Lots of useful advice here.  On the job front -- you can make time to ski no matter what you want to do for work.  You may have to give up other things, though.

 

To ski a lot you'll either need to live near the mountains, make boatloads of money (without having to work 24/7), or have enough flexibility to take weeks or months off at a time in the winter.  (Barry, the aforementioned underwater photographer who lives in Florida, has lots of scheduling flexibility.  That lets him go spend a month in CO when he wants to.)  Living near the mountains requires either a job you can do mostly remotely, or working in the ski industry, or being less choosy about employers/jobs, or luck.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cal22 View Post

Im also a mechanical engineering student right now.  My advice would be to just study what you enjoy.  If your into skiing that much youll find the time to do it no matter what you study.  You can always take a year or two off after you graduate and ski bum for a while.

 

You can definitely ski a ton and not get behind in your classes.  Just load up on classes in the fall semester and work your ass off. Then take less classes in the spring semester and make your schedule based around skiing. I made it so I got out by 1030 three times a week.  Made one or two of those work days and headed to the mountain the others.
 

 

Seems like pretty solid advice to me.  Taking a year off after graduation is a lot easier than trying to do the same 5 or 10 years down the road, as I'm finding out firsthand.

 

re: class scheduling, you may even be able to arrange for some weekdays completely free, depending on how you can line things up.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rolfe Schmidt View Post

(re: investing)

 

I wish there were a simple answer, I'd be doing it myself.  At least there are a few simple things to remember

 

  1. Don't get yourself financially trapped.  As NaySayer pointed out, this is easy to do.  Big student loans are a great way to start and excess consumption (nice car, big house, etc.) will pound the nails in the coffin.  Save, don't spend.  This doesn't mean you're pining away for retirement.  Most of the world lives on far less than we do, and we don't have a monopoly on happiness.  
  2. Don't invest in anything until you have a solid cushion of cash. 6 months living expenses is reasonable.  If you work in some industries you may want more.
  3. There is no free lunch.  If someone offers you one, run.
  4. Don't invest in anything you don't understand.  That will keep you away from those free lunches too.
  5. Minimize fees of any sort.  Return on investment is fickle, but fees are a guaranteed loss.

 

That's all very solid advice, especially #3 and #4 in terms of avoiding scams.  Anything financial that sounds too good to be true -- it is.  (There is no way to make a lot of money very quickly with no risk.)  If the person trying to sell you on something can't or won't explain how it works and what the risks are in a way that you understand, or says there are no risks, they're either incompetent or trying to scam you.

 

For long-term investing IMO it's hard to argue against low-cost broad-market stock and bond index funds.  If you're really looking into living off savings for a long time you probably want to look at some kind of annuities, but they can be complicated and you should talk to an actual financial planner if you're thinking about this.

 

OP, if you're still looking for ski/boot advice, you should create a separate thread in the gear discussion forum, or do some searching there.

post #54 of 55

For financial advice, there is tons of info out there and the basics are free, you do not need to pay someone to learn the basics (whether directly or hidden through fees on your investments)

 

Too much to think that you can write up in a single forum post, and whole other websites forums geared towards specfic things.

 

If you are interested Suggest you can put in "basics of investing" or "investing guide" into google and read through a few guides from reputable sources that you've heard of like smartmoney and forbes or other things with a magazine or other presence.   

 

Or as mentioned before, check out amazon for a "for dummies" book on investing/personal finance or borrow for free your library.  Or even Suze Orman who is often criticized for being too basic, is still good baseline information to absorb.

 

If you have no assets though  investing is not something you need to worry about; although there are other aspects of Personal Finance you may need to consider.   

Still it is useful to learn these things as just trying things out to wing it can result in very costly lessons.

post #55 of 55

The basics of financial security (not necessarily becoming uber wealthy) are pretty simple:

 

1) Consistently spend less than you make and save the difference.  The more 'disposable' income you have, the more you should be saving.

 

2) As a corollary to 1), stay out of debt (except maybe home loans and student loans, within reason).

 

3) Don't do anything really dumb that wipes out your savings.  (See points above about not falling for financial scams.)

 

If you can do those you're probably ahead of about 90% of the field.

 

Unless you already have a ton of money, or you make EXTREMELY bad investment choices, following those rules will matter a lot more over the long haul than if you are paying an extra 1%/year in fees somewhere.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion