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A snowboarder form Taiwan need some advice~~

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Hi, everyone.

This is the first time I post on this forum. I come from Taiwan, a snow-free island, that also means I don’t have enough time to increase mileage, and not easy to get advice. I was wondering would it be possible if someone can MA my riding.

Carving aggressively and short turn steady are my goal, any advice would be appreciated.

 

Here is my video, you may focuse on 00:08~01:05(carving turn) and 02:12~02:08(short turn)

 

 

This video was shot on intermediate course in Hakuba Happo one, Nagano, Japan. And last, but not least, I found out somehow I fall down easily on the third phase of heel-side turn, especially when the condition is bumpy. Can you see where the problem is?

post #2 of 9

Ni Hao Eric and welcome to Epic!

 

I love you carving turns! They have high edge angles and very little skidding. Can you see how your hands are on either side of the board and your shoulders are facing where you are going vs being lined up with the board? This creates "twist" pressure on the lower part of the body. If you let that pressure release, the board will want to turn left. If you don't let that pressure release, it's something you have to spend energy fighting. Many riders have a style of riding where there is some element of this in their riding, but the ideal position is to have the shoulders aligned with the board and the hands either over the toe side of the board or covering the nose and tail.

 

Just before your fall, you can see the back end of the board start to bounce. This happens in several of your heel side turns. It's happening because you are trying to increase the edge angle of the board after the half way point of the turn. Between that, loading up pressure on the front of your board and the release of the twist, the nose of your snowboard is trying to turn sharply. But because it is getting stuck as it tries to cross under your body, the only thing left at this point is for the tail of the board to let loose. Except it is locked in a carve. So it is going to try to violently break free.

 

eric1.jpg

See your front hand is a lot lower than your back hand? That's a sign that you are loading more weight on the front foot. At this point of the turn the board should be catching up to the body (i.e. back foot moving forward. See your tracks in the snow? There's a big gap where you change edges. There's also not a lot turn going on in the top half of the turn relative to the bottom half of the turn. If we can get more turn going on in the top half, we will need less in the bottom half. The first thing I want you to try is to finish your to turns more across the hill (i.e. so the tracks point more to the right). Also notice how your heel side tracks are thinner than your toe side tracks. Your toe side tracks have more skidding, but they are rounder. See how the heel side tracks are not a smooth carve? Giving the carving I wouldn't think that was possible. But it is because the board is still at a low angle because of the late start to the turn.

 

eric2.jpg

 

Can you see how your whole board is flat to the snow at the entry to your heel side turns? The second thing I want you to try is to start your turn by moving the front foot onto the heel first instead of moving both feet onto heel edge at the same time. 

post #3 of 9

I have been told by an instructor to not do that when carving.


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRusty View Post


The second thing I want you to try is to start your turn by moving the front foot onto the heel first instead of moving both feet onto heel edge at the same time. 



 

post #4 of 9

Eric,

 

For your short radius turns, we need to teach you about dynamic carving. In the bumps you are demonstrating an excellent nose roll technique for turn initiations. When the bumps get super steep, this is a great thing to help start your turns. Once you get the board pivoted onto the new edge, we'd like to see you carve across the bump instead of side slip down it. But this a phase that many riders who are new to the bumps go through. 

 

On the flatter terrain we can see the problem with this approach clearer.

eric4.jpg

This is you just before engaging your heel side edge.

eric3.jpg

This is you just after.

 

You get onto the new edge in your short radius turns by jamming your back foot out. Oh Lord if I could only have five cents for every turn made this way!  This technique is easy to learn and it works, but it is not very efficient and not high performance. You are doing all the work instead of letting the board help you (or you are turning the board versus the board turning you). 

 

In regular snowboard turns both feet go onto toe and heel side edge at mostly the same time and both legs bend and straighten at the same time and if a stick was dragged on the snow directly underneath your belly button, that line traced by the stick would stay pretty close to the tracks made by your board. The edging and flex/extend movements are mostly simultaneous (both feet/legs doing the same moves at the same time)

 

In dynamic turns, the path of the bell button takes much different path than the path of the board and the feet/leg movements are much more sequential  (doing things one at a time) than simultaneous. The after photo above is a good starting point for imagining a dynamic turn. Your back leg is straight and your front leg is bent. In a dynamic turn, the back leg would begin to pass underneath the body (and shorten) as the front leg would travel out to the other side (and get longer). As the front leg goes out to the other side it is going onto to toe edge. At the same time the back foot is going to flat. After the back foot passes underneath the body, the back leg lengthens and the back foot starts to go on toe edge. But at this point, the front foot is already starting to come back to the body and the front foot is starting to flatten.

 

This isn't easy to do. The first thing is that you have to get your hips lower to the ground in order for the legs/board to get way out from under your body and still maintain contact with the snow. Then you have to really bend your legs to get them to pass under the hips without raising them off the snow. The second thing is that you need to work your weight forward and back along the length of the board at exactly the right time.

 

My favorite way to teach dynamic carving is to teach the "opposite" of the technique you are using. Instead of starting your turns with kicking the back foot to the outside of the new turn, finish your old turn by kicking the back foot to the inside of the new turn. This will stall your old turn out as the back foot gets more down the hill than the front foot. To come out of the stall, you must shift your weight forward aggressively. As the nose of the board start to turn down the hill as a result of this movement, add a strong tilt of the front foot onto the new edge. From here, just let the back foot follow through the turn and your weight will naturally recenter to prepare for the next turn. When you kick the back foot out for the next turn, you are actually shifting your weight to the rear foot. This sets you up for the next forward move to come out of the stall again. This introduces you to the sequential movement patterns that enable dynamic carving. From here, it's just a matter of smoothing out the stall motion and starting to lower your hips to the snow more.

 

This said, I've never found anyone able to do these kinds of turns from reading the Internet. Like I said, this isn't easy. Most people need some coaching in order to "get it". But once you do these kinds of short radius turns on a groomed trail it becomes obvious how useful these turns are in the bumps. In the bumps, skiers use both legs at the same as shock absorbers. In the bumps, riders need to use one leg at a time to get the best shock absorber performance. Think of this way: as you travel over the top of a bump the front foot comes up the hip while the back foot extends down to the bottom of the trough, then back leg shrinks as it comes up to the top of the bump and the front leg lengthens as it goes down into the trough.

 

You've already got some of the moves to do this. As seen in the after picture above, you've got some of the sequential leg movements. And in the carving heel side turn you are getting your feet way out from underneath the body. Good luck in your quest for higher performance riding. I hope this helped.

post #5 of 9

Hi Rusty, My previous post did not come out right. I took a private lesson to learn carving before. The instructor told me to switch edge at the same time instead one at a time. I am just wondering why?

post #6 of 9

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by hellside View Post

I have been told by an instructor to not do that when carving.

 

So have I. I've been told by more instructors to do it.

 

Leaving the debate out of it, I offer this: If you can't use board twist to initiate your turns, then you can't make the choice whether to use it or not.

 

 

post #7 of 9

Ok. Is it easier to do it one way than the other? It seemed to help me at the time. It does not seem matter to me now but I have been wondering

Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRusty View Post

 

 

So have I. I've been told by more instructors to do it.

 

Leaving the debate out of it, I offer this: If you can't use board twist to initiate your turns, then you can't make the choice whether to use it or not.

 

 

 

 

post #8 of 9

Personally, I don't really notice much difference in larger radius turns and for very large turns I find it counter productive. I do notice a positive difference in short radius dynamic carved turns. If you're steering with your back foot, twist is a bad thing. It's harder to longitudinally twist the board than not twist the board. It's easier to learn the move in larger radius turns than smaller radius turns.

post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 

Thanks Rusty for MA my video, but I have to spend a little time to study your comment, 'cause I'm not a English native speaker.

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