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Okay, so it's ONLY the meniscus... - Page 3

post #61 of 82

Heal well Cirque, so you can go back to Alpine Meadows and make that run your bitch!

post #62 of 82
Thread Starter 

As I understand it, the recovery is very quick once things are cleaned up.  I would have done this in April, but the insurance is all for the approach "let's wait and see".

post #63 of 82
Ain't insurance wonderful, Cirque?

My wife's two meniscus repairs (one on each side) both got to where she felt "good as new" after about a year.

I'm told I had meniscus trimming when they screwed the plate onto my tibia plateau. I have no idea what the recovery would be like, of course, because I was off the leg so long for bone mending. My leg pain today mostly is related to the muscle cut off to gain access to the bone for the repair.
post #64 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post

As I understand it, the recovery is very quick once things are cleaned up.  I would have done this in April, but the insurance is all for the approach "let's wait and see".

That may depend on what else they find. I had arthroscopic surgery done 6 weeks ago. They removed some torn cartilege (meniscus). removed some scar tissue, shaved some cartilege and did a lateral release (to allow the kneecap to move back into position), also cut something called the Plica.. Evidently an MRI does not necessarily provide an accurate picture of things. Once into the knee they can get a better idea of what needs to be done. I had been told, based on my MRI, that I had no cartilege remaining under my kneecap  but that turned out not to be the case. However a small hole in the cartilege elsewhere lead to the surgeon doing a microfracture on the tibial plateau to stimulate new growth there.  As a result I've been on crutches for the last 6 weeks. I started physical therapy three weeks ago and expect to be off crutches early next week but I haven't been able to get an answer as to whether I'll be able to ski this winter. I suppose I could have instructed the surgeon to restrict the operation to the meniscus but I asked them to do what will best insure that I can continue to lead an active life. It seems like a shame to not do everything you can while they are in there looking at your knee. I also played the "wait and see" game for awhile and passed on a chance to have the operation early this past summer but it clearly was not going to go away and, based upon where the damaged material actually was, could have lead to further damage so I finally relented to having the operation in mid September.

 

Other than the nuisance of having to keep weight off the leg and having to be on crutches it has been fine so far, very little pain, if any, just swelling and stiffness. I never even had to use pain medication after the anesthesia wore off. We shall see what its like to be off the crutches. I have a feeling its going to be awhile before I can be really active again.

 

The surgery really is amazing. They actually place a tourniquet on your leg so the operation has to be done in a pretty brief time frame. The whole thing, I think, was about a half an hour. The two incisions are tiny, leaving almost no sign that surgery had been done.

 

I think if the operation is restricted to the meniscus you could be up and walking in a couple days, based upon what I've been told.

 

Good luck if you decide to do it.

post #65 of 82
Thread Starter 

The diagnostic on the MRI included every possibility under the sun for things like micro-fractures, "menisectomy", and tendon damage or detachments.  While I think the procedure will be minimal, they clearly want to make decisions once the injury is in view, and clear up any issues that contribute to the catching, popping and pain.  I feel pretty good on the leg.  It's been 8-months and most days it seems I could live with it until I stress it, or immobilize the knee for a period of time. Then it catches, pops or just gets spontaneously painful.  Over the summer, motorcycle riding was one place I felt it, because the knee is bent over 90 degrees for sustained periods, and rising on the pegs was difficult.  But even swimming would cause a twinge when my legs crossed during the breathing stroke and hyper-extended on the meniscus.

 

It would be easy to ignore this if I wasn't active.  Thanks for the good wishes.  I'm all set to go for it.

post #66 of 82

I tore my meniscus two years ago, and sat around waiting for it to heal. Doesn't sound like its nearly as bad as yours though, mine is just a click when I straighten it, soreness with weather changes, and some weakness when the knee is at 90 degrees, no locking. I found that lowering my bike seat works the muscles in my knees much better and really helps build the knee up, but that's not physician based... so ignore that statement. 

Also my 48 year old mother tore her acl two years ago... and it only took her 5 1/2 months to get back to 100%. Healing time all depends on the individual. 

Best of luck with surgery and recovery, hope you can get out and make some turns!

post #67 of 82
Thread Starter 

Leaving for surgery right now. 

 

Please don't spam the forum while I'm gone, wink.gif

post #68 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post

Leaving for surgery right now. 

 

Please don't spam the forum while I'm gone, wink.gif

We'll put Terry on the spam catcher duty. biggrin.gif

 

Good luck, and heal well!

post #69 of 82
Thread Starter 

I'm back enjoying the miracle of modern drugs and arthroscopic surgery.   There were a couple grade II tears in the lateral meniscus, a pretty good set of microfractures and arthritic changes on the back of the patella.  All in all I'm feeling pretty good, and am already weight-bearing and doing flexibility exercises.

post #70 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post

I'm back enjoying the miracle of modern drugs and arthroscopic surgery.   There were a couple grade II tears in the lateral meniscus, a pretty good set of microfractures and arthritic changes on the back of the patella.  All in all I'm feeling pretty good, and am already weight-bearing and doing flexibility exercises.

Glad it's going well!

post #71 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post

I'm back enjoying the miracle of modern drugs and arthroscopic surgery.   There were a couple grade II tears in the lateral meniscus, a pretty good set of microfractures and arthritic changes on the back of the patella.  All in all I'm feeling pretty good, and am already weight-bearing and doing flexibility exercises.

beercheer.gif

post #72 of 82

I just had Arthroscopic surgery on my lateral meniscus last week.  Really easy procedure, I was walking the day of the surgery and am feeling way better a week after the surgery than what I was feeling prior.  I should be on the snow in 2 or 3 weeks.  Gotta love modern medicine.

post #73 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by eastskier44 View Post

I just had Arthroscopic surgery on my lateral meniscus last week.  Really easy procedure, I was walking the day of the surgery and am feeling way better a week after the surgery than what I was feeling prior.  I should be on the snow in 2 or 3 weeks.  Gotta love modern medicine.

You're fortunate. I had arthroscopic surgery on the menisci back in September. They've had me on crutches for almost 7 weeks. I am just getting off the crutches now. They can't tell me if I'll be able to ski this winter. It wasn't the surgery on the meniscus though but the other stuff (chondroplasty, lysis of adhesions, excision of plica, lateral release and microfracture) that had me on crutches. I think they must have done everything to me that they could bill the insurance company for. The whole thing though is an outpatient procedure over very quickly with little pain. I could walk immediately after surgery but they did not want any weightbearing on the affected  knee in order to give the microfracture clot time to form. For what it's worth I read recently that Bode Miller also had microfracture done on his knee recently and that it might keep him off the World Cup circuit this winter so I guess it isn't only broken down old geezers who are affected.

post #74 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post

I'm back enjoying the miracle of modern drugs and arthroscopic surgery.   There were a couple grade II tears in the lateral meniscus, a pretty good set of microfractures and arthritic changes on the back of the patella.  All in all I'm feeling pretty good, and am already weight-bearing and doing flexibility exercises.


beercheer.gif

Heal well Cirque, heal well!

post #75 of 82
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider View Post

I'm back enjoying the miracle of modern drugs and arthroscopic surgery.   There were a couple grade II tears in the lateral meniscus, a pretty good set of microfractures and arthritic changes on the back of the patella.  All in all I'm feeling pretty good, and am already weight-bearing and doing flexibility exercises.


Yaaaaayyyyyyy!!!!!
post #76 of 82
Thread Starter 

Thanks Kneale.  The hard part for me has actually been not over-stressing the knee too soon.  I've learned that payback is a bitch if you do.  Nice to see you getting an early start on your season.  Your recovery and determination are an inspiration.

post #77 of 82
Thread Starter 

One week post-op and I'm weight bearing, but excessive activity causes swelling an pain.  ROM is limited.  My first foll-up appointment is Monday.  I think it's safe to say the first half or more of ski season is out of the question.  The orthopedic suggested at least 3-months. th_dunno-1[1].gif

post #78 of 82
Until you get to full ROM with weight bearing that doesn't cause swelling, you probably should follow the doctor's suggestions. Are you seeing a therapist? Remember that you need to recoup the muscle strength that disappears with reduced activity. I've been skiing 90-120 minutes and stopping when the knee begins to complain, so I've had no significant swelling now, but I remember swelling occurring after most therapist manipulations for the three months post surgery. Of course, mine was a more invasive procedure and nearly a year ago.
post #79 of 82

Good luck with everything, Cirque.  Sounds like the procedure went well and you're on the road to recovery.  

 

Something I've learned (the hard way) over a number of foot and knee surgeries is that the doctors typically really do know what they're talking about.  Not only that, but sacrificing a few weeks of skiing THIS season may result in a lot more skiing during the rest of your lifetime.  These joints and ligaments and muscles and bones really do take time to heal.  

 

These discussions on the internet are a two-edged sword.  On the one hand, it's really great to hear from other people who have had similar ailments and repairs.  It helps you better understand what some of the solutions to common problems might be and what to expect in recovery from those solutions.  On the OTHER hand, it's awfully easy to fall into the trap of comparing your own procedure and recovery to others that you read about here and other places.  

 

We all hear about someone who has arthroscopy one week and goes out skiing two weeks later.  While it happens, it's not the norm and it's important to remember that every person is different, every joint problem has different elements to it, and the healing/recovery period is different for every procedure.  

 

Skiing will still be there whether you return to it the middle of February or the end of March (or even next season).  I know you know that, but I just think that some of these testimonials we see might make for unreasonable expectations and lead some people to going back out there sooner than is really healthy for them. 

post #80 of 82
Thread Starter 

Well, I didn't meet with the doctor after surgery, and won't have my first appointment until Monday.  The generic instructions I received didn't advise activity levels or recommend anything other than elevation and ice the first few days, and that bandaging could be removed after 3 days.

 

I over-did the activity and weigh bearing and paid with swelling and bruising in the upper leg.  So I AM taking it easier now, but it's not something that comes naturally.  I do wish I had received a clear instruction regarding the level of activity I can engage in, or should avoid. One thing I do know is my ROM is not sufficient to put my foot on the pegs of the motorcycle, so that is a notable impairment.  I had planned to ride to my first exam...redface.gif

post #81 of 82
Hi all this is Mega it's been many months since I checked in I am dictating this so it may not come out quite as good as if I typed it but my typing is awful I had my right sided complete quadricep tear April 16th 2015 so it's been just days past one year I can remember all the Milestones the first shower getting past 90 the first bicycle Revolution walking without crutches getting rid of the brace excetra you newbies will all get through all these things and reach the point where I'm at now one year later let me tell you what it's like my knee will never be the same but I can do almost anything I could do before I am a triathlete run bike swim row and a competitive bodybuilder even though I'm still 66 years old I have now developed the new training program where I use Nordic walking sticks in a 25 pound weight vest and do power walking which gives me a better workout than the people jogging that I'm only allowed to do because my leg still has a little wobble in it nevertheless all of you that are wondering if you'll ever get back to working out you will get there in a year will go by in a blink at least it does when your 66 I hope I never go through this again because it was one of the worst things that ever happened to me in my athletic training happy healing Mega
post #82 of 82

Always use surgery as a very last resort.  Proper stretching before and after prevents lots of injury.  Also proper diet.  Be sure to add protein.  If recommended calcium supplements.  Stay Well.

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