EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Ski Poles, a valuable device, or unnecessary?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Ski Poles, a valuable device, or unnecessary? - Page 6

post #151 of 166

I was always taught that the hand slips in from the bottom of the strap, and then grasps the strap and the grip.  This allows for support of the hand with the strap and at the same time if you let go lets the hand can be pulled thru.  Secondly if you have the pole yanked out, thumb tucks in and poles slips off.

 

Been skiing that way for over 40 years and have yet to have skiers thumb.  Bent bones, cut face (safety strap days), cracked vertebrae (oops, that one hurt, still does occasionally, play hard, pay hard), tweaked elbows, shoulders, knees, ankles (falls), but never a thumb.

 

 

 

 

 

post #152 of 166

Trekking-Pole-Straps.jpg

 

And yes, having detachable/breakaway straps is highly recommended.

post #153 of 166

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschoolskier View Post

Been skiing that way for over 40 years and have yet to have skiers thumb.  Bent bones, cut face (safety strap days), cracked vertebrae (oops, that one hurt, still does occasionally, play hard, pay hard), tweaked elbows, shoulders, knees, ankles (falls), but never a thumb.

 

 

 

I broke my thumb twice in one season using the old Scott strapless grips like Rossi Smash's here.  My thumb would get kinda sheared off when I touch down because with thumb on top exposed it is more vulnerable than it is balled up with the fingers around the pole instead.

Scott Grip.jpg

 

 

I changed to strapless Allsop Shocks where the thumb goes around instead of on top and didn't have any more problems.

 

post #154 of 166

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

Trekking-Pole-Straps.jpg

 

And yes, having detachable/breakaway straps is highly recommended.

 

Exactly, yes my straps are breakaway, never have had the strap breakaway though (have to find a piece of wood) smile.gif

post #155 of 166

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschoolskier View Post

I was always taught that the hand slips in from the bottom of the strap, and then grasps the strap and the grip.  This allows for support of the hand with the strap and at the same time if you let go lets the hand can be pulled thru.  Secondly if you have the pole yanked out, thumb tucks in and poles slips off.

 

Been skiing that way for over 40 years and have yet to have skiers thumb.  Bent bones, cut face (safety strap days), cracked vertebrae (oops, that one hurt, still does occasionally, play hard, pay hard), tweaked elbows, shoulders, knees, ankles (falls), but never a thumb.

 

 

 

 

 

 

You do that in the bush and you'll find the strap grabs your wrist and pulls you as hard as it is stuck.  Not a good option for staying healthy.  On piste I used to do this but went to the Leki system pole grips and trigger system. I lost my gloves a second time with my straps on it and just used them sans straps for the last three years only losing them occasionally when they would grab a tree with the larger baskets I use.

 

My worst hand injury was when I got hit from behind by an out of control skier and I was knocked over just as I was committing to the turn. I had no time to plan the fall and landed on my hand held in straps just as you suggest. My thumb joint moved in an unusual range of movement sideways and I can still feel it 6 years later though it seems to function ok. The pain was long lasting and made being a carpenter a job of hell until i could use my favored hand.

 

There's no easy solution here. I think segbrown has invented a bit of a way to use straps more safely and other than that I would recommend the Leki system poles or others as they become available. I have released mine  but prefer to not replace the gloved straps. i may get a set of conventional straps that click in to the release mechanism and try segbrowns' method as an experiemnt. It's just too simple and may work fine. 

 

 

post #156 of 166

I don't use the pole straps.  I still managed to injury my thumb a couple of years ago. I was, on another occasion, however, able to throw away a pole when I realized it was somehow crossed up and braking my ribs during an unpleasant high-speed crash. 

post #157 of 166
The pole strap method described by OldSchoolSkier and illustrated by Crgildart has a number of advantages, and I strongly recommend it. It is the traditional way of using pole straps, which aren't just there to keep you from losing your poles when you fall. Worn as in Crgildart's illustration, the pole straps give your hand support, so can push on them and use them to propel yourself forward as in cross-country skiing, without having to hold them with a death grip. For safety, although any non-releasable pole strap can entangle you and injure your arm, shoulder, or wrist, they can actually pull off fairly easily when worn properly. Worn that way, when the pole pulls hard against you, it tends to pull your wrist straight, where it can slip off--invariably taking your glove with it. It's easy to demonstrate, and it has happened to me when my pole has gotten caught in branches. The alternative--putting your hand down through the loop, with the strap over the top of your glove--tends to bend your wrist down when pulled hard, virtually locking itself on.

Still better not to have them on at all when they get caught, and I usually do remove my straps when I'm skiing in trees.

Here's another look at the "proper" technique for pole straps:

Best regards,
Bob
post #158 of 166

I know this is a given, but be sure to NOT have your straps around your wrist when you venture into the BC, or when ave danger is high.     My straps go round my fingers, just a habit now...   Although if I am skating in the BC or stuck in a long flat spot at a resort,  I will wrap them, only if it's a long trek.  

post #159 of 166

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post

Trekking-Pole-Straps.jpg

 

And yes, having detachable/breakaway straps is highly recommended.

 

Having detachable thumb would help too...

 

post #160 of 166

I no longer use my pole straps because my son cut them off when he was working patrol and I loaned them to him. 

To Buttinski--are you one of those folks who herringbones and snowplows into other people's skis in non level lift lines and loading ramps? 

post #161 of 166
I remember another pole related injury I had, fell in a mogul field and somehow my index finger got crushed when I landed on my pole and sandwiched my finger in between them. I now have a big bump on my finger tip that never went away. I think it's some sort of lump that grew on the bone. Damn poles caused me more injuries than my skis ever have .....
post #162 of 166
Thread Starter 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post

I no longer use my pole straps because my son cut them off when he was working patrol and I loaned them to him. 

To Buttinski--are you one of those folks who herringbones and snowplows into other people's skis in non level lift lines and loading ramps? 

 

Only when said person deserves it!biggrin.gif

post #163 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by VinceK View Post

I think the pole plant is more critical the shorter the turn becomes.  Because it is not only used as a balance tool, but also a turning force.  Now I don't mean poles help you turn, I mean they force you to turn; just like a tree doesn't help you turn, but it forces you to turn.  And with a shorter the turn there is more need to make quick turns, so you get the strong almost blocking pole plant.

 

Take this guy as an example:

 

As you can see in his medium and long radius turns he has just a small pole touch.  However, when he is making short radius turns his pole plants are really planted in the snow to allow that extra turning force.

 

And that is why a strong pole plant is critical in mogul skiing... I could go on, but I will let Micheal Rogan tell you why.

 

sure enjoyed watching this- like looking all the reason why

I've skied without poles- with one ski- while fun and different- just can't see any reason to not have poles

 

been a really good read and chuckles every now and then at this whole first read of you folks

 

Buttinski- post #3- "knowing my hill" just about sums up all your coments

post #164 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by shadowdyn View Post... while fun and different- just can't see any reason to not have poles...

Having fun and being different are two reasons that come to mind...

 

Unless you prefer boredom and conformity...

 

Welcome to Epicski!

post #165 of 166

thanks-

back in the day- never saw any of you folks-

 

I'm amazed at what you can do- while you might not be real aggressive in the moguls- I've had to stop and watch every time- smoothe- you folks are something else

 

hats off to you- you are in a class of your own

post #166 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post

Unless you prefer boredom and conformity...

 

I thrive on 'em!!!  icon14.gif

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Ski Poles, a valuable device, or unnecessary?