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Crashed Into Much......? - Page 4

post #91 of 101

Yes, but the air horn is more fun than a mere verbal warning.

post #92 of 101

It won't seem like so much fun if you blow it at me. Unless you'd like it down your throat. smile.gif

 

post #93 of 101


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post

It won't seem like so much fun if you blow it at me. Unless you'd like it down your throat. smile.gif

 



Fortunately for DesiredUserName he's on the West Coast and you're on the East. And I think he's joking.  

post #94 of 101

Where's the smilie?

post #95 of 101


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post

If you can't safely pass without issuing a verbal warning that your potential victim can hear, you're doing it wrong. Do I need to wear a bright orange vest with "DEAF SKIER" on it?


Well, as an admitted Cat-Track Hack, I concede you may well be right, which is all the more reason to have a cheat on hand!

 

Don't fret, though; if I come upon you wearing a "Deaf Skier" vest, I won't use the CTCD (Cat-Track Clearing Device). 

I'll simply curse you from behind believing you can't hear me anyway.

 

(I cannot use any smiley-cons, as my lame, hand-cranked backwoods internet won't pull up the smiley-con page)  :-(

 

post #96 of 101

BV2.jpg

post #97 of 101

I'll bite.

 

One of the local hills I ski, has a conjested slow down area which no one especially those that have no control seem to do (snowboards and punk skiers alike).  My solutions is I ski with the pointy ends of the ski poles pointed in the uphill  direction, and when stop off to the side and out of the way, leave at least one pole point in the uphill direction.  Anyone I ski with is made aware of this technique and after one or two near misses uses it.

 

Right of way, and accident avoidance all of a sudden becomes an utmost importance to those that normally don't care.  It appears that these individuals are aware of the surroundings and only choose to practice safe skiing/boarding when it involves avoiding to run into sharp point things to avoid injury to themselves.  So self centered of them nonono2.gif takes the fun out of have sharp point poles (BTW how do I sharpen my carbide tips on the end of my poles special tools available, or is that a new thread)

 

Touche duel.gif.

 

 

 

post #98 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post

Where's the smilie?



Here goes.....biggrin.gif

 

 

 

post #99 of 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matthias99 View Post

On the flip side of this, one of my biggest concerns while teaching is people who overtake without giving enough clearance.  If you have given someone a "reasonable" margin while passing them, they should not be able to cut in front of you no matter what they do.  If you can't overtake them without risking them cutting you off, you are way too close to them and/or moving way too fast relative to them.

 

I agree that's 100% true for 99.99% of skiable terrain. There's no reason some wingnut needs to be on your tail on even a medium-sized trail. 

 

The point of contention for most people is usually cattracks. On Blackcomb, one particular cattrack (crystal traverse off the glacier chair) is maybe six feet wide and winds around a mountainside with a cliff on the other side. Beginners and intermediates freak out when straightlining it, and revert to a braking wedge, often using the entire width of the (not wide) run. The rest of skiers will almost always straightline.  Once the cattrack gets crowded, it can be an ugly scene when a beginner wedge turns their way, comes to a stop, etc. 

 

I see this sort of situation (overly crowded cattrack down a moderately steep pitch with no bailout options) as a big gray area. Would the "uphill" skier be at fault for colliding with the "downhill" skier? Yes, of course. Is it wise for a novice skier be on this cattrack? No, as they're becoming a significant obstacle for everyone else. Should Whistler intervene? Yes, they really should dig out a wider cattrack. 

 

But just because something's legal or "right" doesn't mean it's smart or the best choice. 

post #100 of 101

Cat-tracks can definitely be very dangerous when overcrowded.  I saw a startled kid turn to dodge someone and go right over the edge in Switzerland -- a fairly steep drop (they needed help to get hauled back up), but fortunately into soft snow and they didn't hit a tree.

 

Quote:
Is it wise for a novice skier be on this cattrack? No, as they're becoming a significant obstacle for everyone else.

 

Yeah, but if they get onto it and then realize it's not a good place to be, trying to blow past them unsafely isn't helping.

 

Sounds like they need to change the traffic pattern there.

post #101 of 101

  He's an idiot, patrol doesn't care , the resort certainly doesn't care unless their getting sued and banned? forget it... don't ski with people that are stupid is my advice, I'd be pissed too, and I never hold back on letting someone know it.

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