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Monoskis - why bother? - Page 4

post #91 of 105

Guess it's pretty much the same as (two) skis: Different tools for different conditions; different strokes for different folks.

 

Came across this...

 

 

Straight out of Warren Miller Entertainment's new film Chasing Shadows, monoboarding is alive and well—contrary to popular belief.

 

http://www.skinet.com/ski/article/behind-scenes-monopalooza

post #92 of 105

Ha! I took my yellow banana Hammer down Outhouse my first year here and it was brutal. The worst thing about it was the flex underfoot. The moment it flexed too much I would pop out of my bindings like someone squeezing a deck of cards between their fingers and thumb. Two seasons ago I skied Outhouse with over a foot of fresh powder.  On a Mountain 177 the upper portion was maybe a half dozen turns. Felt like bouncing around on a lumpy cloud.

 

FWIW, regardless of your usage (or whether you're skiing on 2 planks or 1), this is how to get in shape for winter. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JXmCXaptR2Q

Though not nearly as inspiring as the woman in the video, anytime I have a free minute in my day I'm doing the exercises at :35 and :50 on my bosu ball mixed in with some mountain climbers. That and jumping rope to wake up those muscles that atrophy during cycling season.

post #93 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRusty View Post
 

If you grew up skiing when having your feet locked together was the ultimate expression of parallel skiing, the appeal of monoskiing is obvious. Using that technique, mono skis are a far better tool than modern skis.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by monoforever View Post
 

Monoski for ever in powder and soap snow

Monoski is the best engine for ride the forest and for take easy full speed in fresh snow

Monoski is just ski with better floataison
Try it and enjoy

 

Here monoski ride from Chamonix / France

www.tkbfilms.com

 

 

After seeing the segment in the Warren Miller 2015 film, Chasing Shadows, about the monoski gathering at Jackson Hole, Rusty's statement makes a lot of sense.  Some of those guys were carving like crazy!  In the video clip from France, definitely can see not just for groomers.

 

 

post #94 of 105

A Google search led me to this thread as I was trying to see what I could sell my monoski for.  After reading the posts and being reminded how awesome these things are, I decided to keep it.  I'm an older guy (45), have been skiing since I was 10 years old.  In my 20's I decided to give monoskiing a try and loved in.  Kept at it for 15 years before going back to skiing so I could teach my kids (I would never recommend monoskiing unless you are already a good skier).

 

Some observations...

 

Contrary to the belief of some in this thread.  Monoskiing doesn't create bad skiing habits.  If anything, it improves your skiing.  I cannot tell you how good your balance gets when you cannot pull your feet apart to catch yourself.  Monoskiing forces you to use more "angulation" (not sure if that is a real term, just what I use) in your hips/legs.  This is directly transferable to skis.  I was a good skier prior and could ski just about anything, but after being on a monoski for all those years, it only got better when I went back.  And the idea that you are all screwed up because you've been on a different edge- well that is ridiculous.  There is no adjustment process when back on two boards, it is automatic.

 

The only places that skis excel at (imo, of course) are on ice, occasionally a traverse, going uphill in deeper snow, or potentially getting yourself out of a tricky spot that you didn't intend to get into (oh sh** this cliff is bigger than I thought).  I've had my share of sketchy moments as I got in a potentially bad situation.  But that happens no matter what your a using to get down a hill.  Also be prepared to get an upper body workout as you have to push yourself around more with your poles as you can't simply walk or skate from point A to B.  These are easily overlooked once you realize how great they are in powder and bumps.  And my favorite, in tight trees with buried tree stumps launching you into each turn. 

 

One thing I didn't see mentioned is that when in very deep snow (waist high or so), you can better control your altitude.  You can do what I call "dolphin turns" where you use your tip to control your depth to pop out of the snow to make a turn.  You don't need to do this of course, but it is very fun.  Also, and this was important for me, since I used to spend my time in the Lake Tahoe hills... A monoski could care less if that deep snow is wet and heavy sierra cement.  It is just as effortless as dry powder.

 

 

 

So now I have a question for those on monoskis.  Where the heck can I get my old board re-mounted with new bindings around here?   I now live in the Portland area.

 

 

Thanks!

post #95 of 105

I saw 3 different people on Mono's at Alta on Saturday -  pretty solid!  - think that warren miller flick has created some stoke on these things - sure look like alot of fun.

 

I've seen want ads in the SLC area looking for these things as well.

post #96 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by lostinPNW View Post

A Google search led me to this thread as I was trying to see what I could sell my monoski for.  After reading the posts and being reminded how awesome these things are, I decided to keep it.  I'm an older guy (45), have been skiing since I was 10 years old.  In my 20's I decided to give monoskiing a try and loved in.  Kept at it for 15 years before going back to skiing so I could teach my kids (I would never recommend monoskiing unless you are already a good skier).

Some observations...

Contrary to the belief of some in this thread.  Monoskiing doesn't create bad skiing habits.  If anything, it improves your skiing.  I cannot tell you how good your balance gets when you cannot pull your feet apart to catch yourself.  Monoskiing forces you to use more "angulation" (not sure if that is a real term, just what I use) in your hips/legs.  This is directly transferable to skis.  I was a good skier prior and could ski just about anything, but after being on a monoski for all those years, it only got better when I went back.  And the idea that you are all screwed up because you've been on a different edge- well that is ridiculous.  There is no adjustment process when back on two boards, it is automatic.

The only places that skis excel at (imo, of course) are on ice, occasionally a traverse, going uphill in deeper snow, or potentially getting yourself out of a tricky spot that you didn't intend to get into (oh sh** this cliff is bigger than I thought).  I've had my share of sketchy moments as I got in a potentially bad situation.  But that happens no matter what your a using to get down a hill.  Also be prepared to get an upper body workout as you have to push yourself around more with your poles as you can't simply walk or skate from point A to B.  These are easily overlooked once you realize how great they are in powder and bumps.  And my favorite, in tight trees with buried tree stumps launching you into each turn. 

One thing I didn't see mentioned is that when in very deep snow (waist high or so), you can better control your altitude.  You can do what I call "dolphin turns" where you use your tip to control your depth to pop out of the snow to make a turn.  You don't need to do this of course, but it is very fun.  Also, and this was important for me, since I used to spend my time in the Lake Tahoe hills... A monoski could care less if that deep snow is wet and heavy sierra cement.  It is just as effortless as dry powder.



So now I have a question for those on monoskis.  Where the heck can I get my old board re-mounted with new bindings around here?   I now live in the Portland area.


Thanks!

Best bet is DIY. I wouldn't trust any shop to mount a monoski, even if they were willing to touch it (and they are not)
post #97 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldjeep View Post


Best bet is DIY. I wouldn't trust any shop to mount a monoski, even if they were willing to touch it (and they are not)

 

Oh man.  Sounds like a good way for me to mess up my board.  I was under the impression you needed a special jig to drill/mount them.  When I bought this thing years ago, it was a big deal to try and locate the jig and then have it shipped to my local shop so that they could mount it.  It was a huge pain. 

 

Thanks

post #98 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by lostinPNW View Post
 

 

Oh man.  Sounds like a good way for me to mess up my board.  I was under the impression you needed a special jig to drill/mount them.  When I bought this thing years ago, it was a big deal to try and locate the jig and then have it shipped to my local shop so that they could mount it.  It was a huge pain. 

 

Thanks


Here is the problem.  Pretty sure that nobody indemnifies their bindings for monoski use any more.  Salomon used to - maybe they still do.  I've always hated Solomans bindings and used to use ESS and now use Marker - basically something with a track that allows the bindings to float and get rid of the huge dead spot that fixed heel/toe setups create.  Never seen a jig for a monoski, I've always used the ref lines and binding paper templates to make a intermediary drilling guide out of plastic.  Its not rocket science.

post #99 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldjeep View Post
 


Here is the problem.  Pretty sure that nobody indemnifies their bindings for monoski use any more.  Salomon used to - maybe they still do.  I've always hated Solomans bindings and used to use ESS and now use Marker - basically something with a track that allows the bindings to float and get rid of the huge dead spot that fixed heel/toe setups create.  Never seen a jig for a monoski, I've always used the ref lines and binding paper templates to make a intermediary drilling guide out of plastic.  Its not rocket science.

 

Okay, maybe you've convinced me to try it.  Perhaps the newer track bindings are easier to mount than the old heel/toe system.

 

Thanks!

post #100 of 105

Try setting up the bindings on a piece of wood. Transfer the hole patterns from the bindings to the board with a punch/nail/something pointy. Drill the wood and mount to the wood. Put your boots in the bindings. Do they fit? Are they square? If so, drill all the way through the piece of wood and use it as a template on your mono-ski. If you have a template, the biggest worry is drilling through the ski. Use a 3.6 mm drill if the board doesn't have a metal top-sheet. Use a 4.1 mm drill and tap if your board has a metal top-sheet (or metal in the mounting area).

 

If you can't scrounge a drill bit from a shop, use some tape as a stop on the drill.

 

Questions? Give me a shout. I have done a few freehand mounts.

post #101 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by MastersRacer View Post
 

Try setting up the bindings on a piece of wood. Transfer the hole patterns from the bindings to the board with a punch/nail/something pointy. Drill the wood and mount to the wood. Put your boots in the bindings. Do they fit? Are they square? If so, drill all the way through the piece of wood and use it as a template on your mono-ski. If you have a template, the biggest worry is drilling through the ski. Use a 3.6 mm drill if the board doesn't have a metal top-sheet. Use a 4.1 mm drill and tap if your board has a metal top-sheet (or metal in the mounting area).

 

If you can't scrounge a drill bit from a shop, use some tape as a stop on the drill.

 

Questions? Give me a shout. I have done a few freehand mounts.


Awesome.  Thanks for the tips.  I'm pretty sure my board does not have a metal top sheet.  If it does, is this literally the top sheet or would it be a layer or two down?  I just looked at the board and there doesn't appear to be any metal layers in the mounting area.  However, I haven't taken the old bindings off to see what is underneath them. 

 

This no longer sounds that complex.  Practicing on some scrap wood would ease most concerns I have.  Thanks!

post #102 of 105

Metal sheets are usually visible in the sidewall if the skis are traditional laminate construction. Except for obvious metal on the top, most metal in skis are covered in plastic.  If you don't know for sure, drill the smaller size hole 3.6 or 3.5 mm. You'll see the metal bits in the debris if it has metal in it, also it will be harder to drill than without metal. If so, just redrill with the 4.1.

 

If you use the wood plank as a template, keep an eye on the size of the hole as it might grow drill.

 

You can also use the punch/sharp tool to make divots in the topsheet that will help the drill start without wandering. Obviously, you want to be as square to the topsheet as possible.

 

Ya. Practicing on a piece of wood or a 'don't care' ski makes working on your good gear a lot less stressful. YOu'll also have to watch out for conflicting hole placement from the old bindings to the new. You don't want new holes closer than a few milimeters from any old holes and you'll need to plug the old holes. 

 

Be sure to use a waterproof glue (I don't like epoxy; it's too permanent) when you plug the holes as well as when you screw in the new bindings.

post #103 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by pdiddy View Post

I spent a few seasons demoing monoski in colorado back in the 90's .   Probably have about 20 days on a monosk/ or monoboard and It was fun as hell in the powder, and soft bumps were a blast, trees were effortless.  I did pop a bunch of jumps and it was great but every time I nuked anything over 15 feet I would double release out of them, so,, either the bindings were just sub par rentals or I was doing something wrong.         As far as binding settings, you have to really crank them down because if you split your knees out,(cowboy) you will pop out.    nyways, really fun, but so is skiing and I did notice a few bad habits forming from using a monoski, like ridding the hell out of the uphill ski when I put on a pair of skis.  

I know Duret makes monoski's/monoboards and Snowshark too.  

Edit:  Add,   oh and the very first day I tried a mono ski it was a powder day and I spent the entire day skiing bumps at the Jane,  so the learning curve between ski's and a monoboard is just a few runs... 
I do that every year for the first few runs due to my snowboarding background.
post #104 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldjeep View Post


I've owned a snowshark tt hammer, decent hard snow ski. Coda is another us manufacturer.

The idea of non release bindings on a monoski scares the crap out of me. I'll stick with regular ski bindings.

 

Tuna pointed me to this manufacturer for their interesting skis, but they do have quite a few mono models...

 

https://www.codaboards.com/monoski_models.php

post #105 of 105

hi all

 

There is something new in the monoski : The monoski "monolith"

 

The firm Aluflex unveils his new monoski. It provides all the necessary information in this blog : http://francemonoski.blogspot.fr/2016/09/aluflex-monolith-2017.html

 

regards

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