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Childrens eye protection and helmets

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 

 

When I was a kid my parents never let me ski without eye protection in the form of sunglasses or goggles with good UV rating, and helmets were never a consideration. Nowdays it seems all kids have helmets but many have no form of eye protection or goggles flopping loose all over their little faces. 
 
Having suffered a moderate snow blindness in my late teens from half a day climbing above the snow line I really appreciate my parents for their attention to eye protection.
 
So it amazes and terrifies me that so many kids are on the slpes with helmets but ill fitting eyewear or none at all. On a sunny day on snow with kids sensitive eyes the chance of some sort of eye damage must be 100%. 
 
It seems to me that the issue is that the bulbous helmets little kids seem to wear are completely incompatible with the small flimsy goggles or sunglasses for kids. 
 
With my son at 2 years old now and thinking about getting him kitted out for the snow I am thinking if I have to decide between effective eye protection or a helmet I will go for eye protection only. Of course the ideal situation is a helmet which works well with childrens goggles but I have never seen such a thing. Does this really exist?
 
post #2 of 8

Yes, you can use both! Get the helmet first, then shop for goggles with the helmet on to check for fit. Sometimes the problem comes when the kids take the goggles off and then try to put them back on. OR the parents put the helmet on like the kid in the background, too far back, and then the goggles don't have a chance. An ill-fitting pair is still better than none, I say.

 

I also found a few pair of kids sunglasses at REI that work with the helmet.

 

IMG_0188.JPG

post #3 of 8

Off topic I know, but what good is a sign that says "unload here" on a magic carpet intended for kids, most of whom can't read? 

post #4 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post

Off topic I know, but what good is a sign that says "unload here" on a magic carpet intended for kids, most of whom can't read? 

 

Assume much?  A lot of the little ones can read.  Especially among the 1% who have the funds to take their kids skiing, there are a lot of precocious ones.

 Even if they can't read it, it's a big attention sign that they learn means do something here, after being instructed on the very first go.

At the lowest level, it's for the parents/instructor so they can interpret what the sign means to the little one.


I suppose in Europe where mulitple languages are more prevelant, then you'd have some weird iconography instead of words.

 

post #5 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by raytseng View Post

 

Assume much?  A lot of the little ones can read.  Especially among the 1% who have the funds to take their kids skiing, there are a lot of precocious ones.

 Even if they can't read it, it's a big attention sign that they learn means do something here, after being instructed on the very first go.

At the lowest level, it's for the parents/instructor so they can interpret what the sign means to the little one.


I suppose in Europe where mulitple languages are more prevelant, then you'd have some weird iconography instead of words.

 


Just proof that on this forum even the most innocuous, tongue in cheek remark will start an argument.  But yeah, around here there are cutouts of clowns and the like at the unloading spots and the instructor can tell the kid to get off at the clown. 

 

post #6 of 8

My kids have Smith helmets that are made to be compatible with Smith goggles.  They have a very nice fit.  http://www.smithoptics.com/products/#/Helmets/Junior+Helmets/

 

...and they could read before they could ski, ha.

 

post #7 of 8

I haven't observed this problem.  My kids both started skiing at age 3.  The older one is now 8.  I've seen an awful lot of little kids skiing over the years.  The worst things I've seen are:

 

1. helmet on backwards (rarely)

2. helmet not strapped (well, maybe not so rare)

3. raging gaper gap (my younger one for sure)

 

My two kids have very differently shaped heads.  Both do OK with the Giro Slingshot and the Smith Sundance.  Probably these are discontinued now.

post #8 of 8

The issue isn't any incompatibility between helmet and goggle. It has a lot more to do with the operator. Many little kids don't like the feeling of their goggles on their faces, so they tend to pull their goggles off. Also, it can be surprisingly difficult to seat a child's goggles properly on their face. Keep in mind, this is typically done on a lift, with one gloved adult hand. My first year instructing, there were a number of unfortunate eye pokes and noses inside the goggle frame incidents. This results in many kids skiing around with their goggles hanging off the back of their helmets. Especially the beginner ones, who aren't going fast enough yet to be bothered by slipstream. In the end, I wouldn't sweat it too much. Typically on really bright days, kids end up asking to have their goggles down. Kids are smart enough to know when it's too bright.

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