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base gouges...do they matter?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

this winter in Tahoe has not been kind to the bases of my skis. rocks, tree stumps, small animals, all have caused a few gouges of different depths and lengths in the base of my skis. question is, does it really matter?  does it affect the performance of the ski and if so how?  

 

do you fill/fix gouges in your skies or leave them?

post #2 of 9
If you are asking, you don't feel them, the scratches don't mean a thing! If you figure out how to keep a P-tex fill in a gouge, let me know, they all fall out for me ;) Tune and wax, and everything is hunky dory!
post #3 of 9

I was going along great until last week when I got a good gouge on a pair of race ski I was training on. I will be getting a new grind this summer to get rid of it. They bother me even if they you could in theory keep using it. For a race ski, it has to affect performance/speed. For a non-race ski, I don't imagine it would be as big a deal to me.

post #4 of 9

Gouges add friction to the base, thus slow you down, they also mean "pivoting" the ski or "schmearing" will be more difficult. 

post #5 of 9

That's what "Real Skiers" call STRUCTURE!

post #6 of 9

After a week in Utah early this season two pair of my skis were gouged up and needed some work.  If you are someone who tunes alot, add Ptex once the wax is run out of your base.  Depending on the conditions, this could be after a day of skiing groomers or cold conditions.  Once the Ptex cools for a couple hours, scrape and then wax.  You will find that the Ptex will come out in some areas, but stay on top of it.  Just keep adding throughout the season.  Eventually you will be able to fill in even the shallowest of gouges.  When followed up by a good wax and brush, your bases will improve though never perfect.

post #7 of 9

1. In most cases, the damage is a mental issue. Even deep, long gauges have little effect on the performance.  Numerous, deep gauges may have enough effect to affect the performance.  Personally, I never got there.  The scratches will bug me even before I can notice the difference.

 

2. If you're going to fix it, do a good job.  Specifically, make sure to remove any base wax, using a solvent.  Ideally, the base in the scratch area should be grey (looking like a base-burn) before you apply the p-tex.  This will ensure good adhesion.  Dripping candles, or using a base welder, on a shiny p-tex base will not yield good results.

 

3. I tend to ignore minor scratches, and fix major scratches throughout the season, and get a base grind at the end of the season.

 

post #8 of 9

Not sure if this is stupid or not, but I use a corner of my metal scraper to lightly scrape the surfaces of the gouge, then swab JUST the gouge with some 100% isopropyl alcohol briefly, and dry (to prevent spreading into the surrounding base area). 

 

Then I drip a ptex candle into the gouge-- making sure to burn only blue flames, no yellow/orange. 

 

Then I wait a few minutes (not hours) and scrape. 

 

Then I wax. 

 

My repairs don't fall out. Though some of the repairs in certain shaped gouges (mainly those that are very narrow but deeper, and perhaps at an angle) have cracked a bit visually, but remain solid... and take up plenty of wax! 

 

I can't say what the measurement is, but I avoid filing really shallow gouges of any length-- those that, subjectively, seem more like structure than "gouges." I base that on feel and visual inspection, figuring if it's too shallow, the repair won't hold since there's basically no material to grip on the sides of the repair. 

 

At the end of the season I'll get a grind/structure on the bases, and I won't do that again until the end of the following season. 

post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by justruss View Post

Not sure if this is stupid or not, but I use a corner of my metal scraper to lightly scrape the surfaces of the gouge, then swab JUST the gouge with some 100% isopropyl alcohol briefly, and dry (to prevent spreading into the surrounding base area). 

 

Then I drip a ptex candle into the gouge-- making sure to burn only blue flames, no yellow/orange. 

 

Then I wait a few minutes (not hours) and scrape. 

 

Then I wax. 

 

My repairs don't fall out. Though some of the repairs in certain shaped gouges (mainly those that are very narrow but deeper, and perhaps at an angle) have cracked a bit visually, but remain solid... and take up plenty of wax! 

 

I can't say what the measurement is, but I avoid filing really shallow gouges of any length-- those that, subjectively, seem more like structure than "gouges." I base that on feel and visual inspection, figuring if it's too shallow, the repair won't hold since there's basically no material to grip on the sides of the repair. 

 

At the end of the season I'll get a grind/structure on the bases, and I won't do that again until the end of the following season. 



Well said icon14.gif
Only things I do different are to press the flat of the cold metal scraper on the ptex immediately after dripping, and "shave" off the repair very gently using many passes with the sharp steel scraper after it cools to level it with the base.

 

 

 

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