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Would Rossi S7s be a good ski for me to learn to ski fresh snow/powder/crud?

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

 

Hi.  Would S7s be a good ski for me to learn to ski fresh snow/powder/crud?  Until now I've mostly stuck to front-side groomers. 

 

On 3/19 I demo'd S7s on a fresh snow day at Deer Valley on runs/conditions I would never attempt with my front-side carvers - and I had fun!  I want to learn how to ski pow, fresh snow, and skied-out crud.

 

Would S7s be a good ski on which I could learn?  I'm a pure novice in these conditions -- I've spent my ski career on front side groomers.  I've never demo'd a fat ski other than the S7s.  From my limited experience, I think they would be a good ski for me -- but should I consider something else as a learning ski?

 

OH -- what would be a good binding for this type of ski in these conditions -- how about a Rossi FKS?

 

Thanks for any thoughts.

 

BACKGROUND

 

Me: 55 years old. Since 2000, I skied 5-10 days/year in the west -- then I retired, and now live in Park City UT.  

 

During 2010-11, I skied about 50 days.  So far during 2011-12 I've skied 65 days.  My plan is to continue skiing until they stick me in an old-folks home.

 

Almost all of the above slope time is on front-side groomers.  To be honest, I've been afraid of lack of control in deeper snow, which of course is a function of training & equipment & practice.

 

SO... step one is equipment.  Hence my S7 question.  Prior to buying them, I thought I'd ask the collective wisdom to see if this is a reasonable ski for me to use to learn.

 

I am not a "powerful" skier with tons of leg strength.  On groomers, if the lines are clear & runs are not crowded, I'll go quite fast - but I am clearly no racer.  My fear is a mismatch of velocity between me and a slower, unpredictable skier or snowboarder who might just "change lanes" - so to prevent an accident I'll slow down when I approach other slower skiers and pass in control (or sometimes I'll decide I just don't want to pass because the other skier/boarder is unpredictable).  I'll ski black runs (non-bump only) by skiing down with only a handful of turns assuming the way is clear.   I'm not afraid of velocity on groomers.

 

In fresh snow  - say boot high or above, I am an absolute novice -- meek and frankly fearful of velocity & losing control & eating it.  I understand from reading other threads here that velocity is your friend on a fresh snow or powder run - but I need the right equipment & training & experience to overcome my fear of losing control. Ditto on bump runs.

 

 

Any equipment thoughts would be appreciated.

 

(OH -- any thoughts on instructors for dump days would also be appreciated!)

post #2 of 6

I don't own the S7, but have tried it, so take my comment with a grain of salt.

 

The general wisdom seems to be that the S7 is a great "do it all" ski which especially shines in soft snow.  Due to conditions, I wasn't able to test that theory, but they did fine on the groomers while skiing with my wife.  

 

The ski is pretty soft, so definitely not for someone super aggressive or a charger.  Based on your description, you are neither, so I think the S7 might be about as good as it gets for a FAT ski that will take you far into advanced territory.

 

There might be others that would be better suited (Armada JJ, etc), but I am not the best equipped person to answer those questions.  I have a similar post on here asking about "better" alternatives to the S7, which got a myriad answers in the replies.

 

As always, your best bet is to try out and demo various skis to get a better idea of what you like.

post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 

Thanks - I'm reading your thread now.

post #4 of 6

You don't mention what you're currently skiing, which might be useful information.  It's possible that you're "psyched" yourself into believing that you can't possibly ski any amount of powder on your current skis.  That might be true but maybe not.  If you're on a pair of skinny waist carving skis it will be much easier for you if you got some fatter skis but if you're currently on some mid fats you don't really need a different ski, you need lessons.

 

FWIW, I tried some S7s last season and unfortunately it was late in the season and no fresh snow at all so I could only try them on groomed runs.  I'm 67, 5'8", 145 pounds, ski everything at my home mountain and I hated them.  I never felt like I was in control and they seemed "floppy."  I think the issue was that I don't really like full rocker, but I do like early rise and want it with a bit of camber.  Think about what you want a new ski to do that your current ski won't do and also think about what properties your current ski has that you would like to have in your next ski.  Then find some skis that have those things you want and demo them.

post #5 of 6
Thread Starter 

I'm currently on K2 Apache Recons, which have served me well on the frontside.  Separately, I think I will be looking for a more advanced frontside ski.

post #6 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by SportyandMisty View Post

 

Hi.  Would S7s be a good ski for me to learn to ski fresh snow/powder/crud?  Until now I've mostly stuck to front-side groomers. 

 

On 3/19 I demo'd S7s on a fresh snow day at Deer Valley on runs/conditions I would never attempt with my front-side carvers - and I had fun!  I want to learn how to ski pow, fresh snow, and skied-out crud.

 

Would S7s be a good ski on which I could learn?  I'm a pure novice in these conditions -- I've spent my ski career on front side groomers.  I've never demo'd a fat ski other than the S7s.  From my limited experience, I think they would be a good ski for me -- but should I consider something else as a learning ski?

 

OH -- what would be a good binding for this type of ski in these conditions -- how about a Rossi FKS?

 

Thanks for any thoughts.

 

BACKGROUND

 

Me: 55 years old. Since 2000, I skied 5-10 days/year in the west -- then I retired, and now live in Park City UT.  

 

During 2010-11, I skied about 50 days.  So far during 2011-12 I've skied 65 days.  My plan is to continue skiing until they stick me in an old-folks home.

 

Almost all of the above slope time is on front-side groomers.  To be honest, I've been afraid of lack of control in deeper snow, which of course is a function of training & equipment & practice.

 

SO... step one is equipment.  Hence my S7 question.  Prior to buying them, I thought I'd ask the collective wisdom to see if this is a reasonable ski for me to use to learn.

 

I am not a "powerful" skier with tons of leg strength.  On groomers, if the lines are clear & runs are not crowded, I'll go quite fast - but I am clearly no racer.  My fear is a mismatch of velocity between me and a slower, unpredictable skier or snowboarder who might just "change lanes" - so to prevent an accident I'll slow down when I approach other slower skiers and pass in control (or sometimes I'll decide I just don't want to pass because the other skier/boarder is unpredictable).  I'll ski black runs (non-bump only) by skiing down with only a handful of turns assuming the way is clear.   I'm not afraid of velocity on groomers.

 

In fresh snow  - say boot high or above, I am an absolute novice -- meek and frankly fearful of velocity & losing control & eating it.  I understand from reading other threads here that velocity is your friend on a fresh snow or powder run - but I need the right equipment & training & experience to overcome my fear of losing control. Ditto on bump runs.

 

 

Any equipment thoughts would be appreciated.

 

(OH -- any thoughts on instructors for dump days would also be appreciated!)


You "had fun."  I think that you answered your own question.

 

I think that you are on the right track on finding an instructor.  Contact the ski school of your choice and ask for recommendations on who may be the best instructor for you.

 

Dennis

 

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