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Diamond files' difference

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 

I have seen that there are 2 types of diamond files, I don't mean whether they are coarse, medium or fine.

One type has circular spots on the surface http://www.holmenkol.com/produkte/diamondfile-110mm-blue-coarse.html

 

and another type has a smoother surface http://www.holmenkol.com/produkte/diamant-world-cup-file-coarse-200-rd.html

 

What is the difference? Which type should I use?

 

Thanks

post #2 of 18

There are way more then 2 types.

 

But the consensus seems to be moonflex. It is hwta I use after trying the DMT's

 

http://www.racewax.com/product/PA-1700/Diaface-Moonflex-Diamond-Stones-100-mm-Full-Set-of-Five.html

 

Get them here. he part of the gang at Epic

post #3 of 18

I like the Moonflex as well. I bought the Sun Valley at first and it was the only one of their products I din't like.

post #4 of 18

Funny thing...  I have some DMT and Moonflex.  I actually prefer the DMT for day-to-day tuning precisely because it cuts less effectively.  I guess I could get a finer Moonflex, but I already own what I own and it works for me.

 

By the way, I'm comparing DMT black with Moonflex red.

post #5 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xela View Post

 

 

By the way, I'm comparing DMT black with Moonflex red.


 

I'm surprised that the DMT black gets enough use for a comparison to be worthwhile?     

 

For hardening-removal the DMT blue grit works fine, and for large-scale metal removal a file works /so/ much better than the DMT black?

 

post #6 of 18
They serve the same purpose, to give the removed metal somewhere to go, doesn't really matter which you use.
post #7 of 18

Diamond files don't cut they polish. Simply, they smooth out striations from the previous coarser grit tool.


 

I always make a couple of passes with a Black Moonflex before filing to soften any work hardened areas of the edge.

 

Then use a progression of stones final polsihing with a a surgical stone or true hardstone.

 

I canned the DMT's years ago. Worthless IMHO!

 

As far as cleaing and lubricating. I use 50% water/50% denatured alcohol, and use a totthbrush to clean.

 

 

Someone in a post recently said they use solution for filing. That's news to me and something I am not interested in doing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Xela View Post

Funny thing...  I have some DMT and Moonflex.  I actually prefer the DMT for day-to-day tuning precisely because it cuts less effectively.  I guess I could get a finer Moonflex, but I already own what I own and it works for me.

 

By the way, I'm comparing DMT black with Moonflex red.



 

post #8 of 18

I started with the Swix version of DMT and they quickly failed. Maybe I didn't keep them clean and lubed enough. Either way, I went with Moonflex and they are perfect and last. When I do a full cycle of Moonflex followed by polishing stones from Reliable, I get a mirror finish. And the edge seems to hold. The only drag is that I now religiously clean both the Moonflex and the stones and it is a lot of work to keep them reasonably clean and smooth. I also use denatured alcohol when using all of them.

post #9 of 18

Word. Moonstone rock. Don't waste time on others.

post #10 of 18
I use oil to lube my diamond stones, even the cheap no name ones does just fine on skis, and they wipe clean after use.
post #11 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by jzmtl View Post

I use oil to lube my diamond stones, even the cheap no name ones does just fine on skis, and they wipe clean after use.


nothing wrong with using oil but water works just as well and is a lot less messy, and you don't have an oily rag to start a fire.  My background in sharpening is woodworking--I can shave hair off my arm with a chisel after I've sharpened it--try that with a ski edge (I guess that wouldn't be very practical but you get the point.)  I do use oil stones for wood tools in Truckee in my unheated garage so I don't have a stone bath to freeze.  BTW maybe some engineer can tell me why some stones--Arkansas for instance--use oil, and some, like Japanese waterstones use water (duh). Is there a structural difference between the stones that mandates oil or water, or is it just tradition? (Hope I haven't offended anyone with the use of the word "mandate".)

post #12 of 18

I would not use oil on my skis.

 

1/2 water and 1/2 denatured alcohol works great. Plenty of lubrication and nice evaporation. 

 

Do you really want oil on your ski bases getting mixed in when you wax. Seems unecessarily messy.

 

Of course when I file side edges I always use base tape and leave it on when I switch to diamonds but still don't want oil on or even near my skis.

 

post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post

I would not use oil on my skis.

 

1/2 water and 1/2 denatured alcohol works great. Plenty of lubrication and nice evaporation. 

 

Do you really want oil on your ski bases getting mixed in when you wax. Seems unecessarily messy.

 

Of course when I file side edges I always use base tape and leave it on when I switch to diamonds but still don't want oil on or even near my skis.

 

 yup, best way to do it.  I keep a spray bottle on the bench and keep it well (over?) lubricated.  Probably spray the diamond 2 or 3 times each edge.

 

I have also started using disposable gloves to try to stop my hands drying out so much
 

 

post #14 of 18


Spray bottle sitting on my bench too and a paint brush to is great to sweep off any metal bits after each pass with a file!
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ScotsSkier View Post

 yup, best way to do it.  I keep a spray bottle on the bench and keep it well (over?) lubricated.  Probably spray the diamond 2 or 3 times each edge.

 

I have also started using disposable gloves to try to stop my hands drying out so much
 

 



 

post #15 of 18

Judging by the number of posts about bad shop work some people apparently don't realize that the alcohol is for the stone.

post #16 of 18

Apparently, the alcohol is for the stoner.

post #17 of 18

I wish it were alcohol use.  There is a remedy for that!

 

Ya can't fix stooooopid!biggrin.gif

 

 

Actually.....................................ignorance!eek.gif

 

post #18 of 18
If you get oil on your base you are using too much. I use it because it's less messy, since I don't have a dedicated tuning station I don't want my basement floor wet or smells like alochol.
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post


nothing wrong with using oil but water works just as well and is a lot less messy, and you don't have an oily rag to start a fire.  My background in sharpening is woodworking--I can shave hair off my arm with a chisel after I've sharpened it--try that with a ski edge (I guess that wouldn't be very practical but you get the point.)  I do use oil stones for wood tools in Truckee in my unheated garage so I don't have a stone bath to freeze.  BTW maybe some engineer can tell me why some stones--Arkansas for instance--use oil, and some, like Japanese waterstones use water (duh). Is there a structural difference between the stones that mandates oil or water, or is it just tradition? (Hope I haven't offended anyone with the use of the word "mandate".)

You can use arkansas (and synthetic) stone with water or dry just fine, as long as you clean all the oil out of it, it's just there to prevent clogging of the stone. Waterstone needs water to form the slurry on top, the bond among particles are such that they break easily if you use it dry you'll wear it out too quick.
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