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Smith I/O Sensor Lens Fogging - Page 2

post #31 of 40

I don't think they're going to work especially well on something that is already wet.  Boot dryers are going to do a much better job, or even the poor man's way of using a hair dryers.  Silica gel is better for just keeping things that are already pretty dry that way-since they just removing moisture from the air, but don't do anything to promote changing the liquid water in the fabric into vapor (needs heat energy). If you are able to get your boots mostly dry  then stick these in, it may help more.

 

If you're going to use them to try to dry out boots in a locker, you'll probably need to stuff 2 if not more right into each boot to see any effect.  OR get silica gel in bulk and make your own packets with coffee filters or a sock or something.  The biggest effect is that while it may still remain damp, stuff in your locker might not get as smelly.

 

The other problem, is they are not going to be effective for multiple drying sessions, you're going to need to recharge them frequently, and also have a ziplock bag to stick them in to keep their remaining drying power.

post #32 of 40

I'm happy to report that a more dedicated attempt to dry out my frames and lenses resulted in zero fogging on my next day up on the slopes.

post #33 of 40

Silica gel is a waste of time and money and a whole separate subject.

 

Any goggle will fog if you get it wet and don't dry it out.  Having skied a fair amount in the rain and snow storms (wet or dryer snow) as a patroller, I know this first hand.  I think the lenses actually will absorb water if it's exposed to a lot of liquid water.  I've had them get wet, fog up and don't get unfogged until I've dried them out over night in a dry area (i.e. take them out of your ski bag and expose them to dry inside air).  If I ski in the rain or snow, I dry my goggles with the same attention I dry my boots and gloves.  My standard day equipment load out also has two pairs of goggles for exactly this reason.

 

So, I'd agree that you don't put your goggles up on wet helmet.  As soon as you introduce a lot of liquid moisture into the sealed space by your face, as soon as it goes into water vapor (i.e. you're heating up from working hard) it will condense on any surface that is colder than the dew point.  That's basic physics and no goggle mfg is going to be able to change that.  But if you are careful, you'll be able to get a pair of goggles through an entire day in the rain.

 

Incidentally, it's not related to any particular brand.  I've had the exact same thing happen with Smith, Scott, Zeal and Bolle and it's completely predictable.  Make sure you dry them out overnight before you go out and make sure you keep liquid water from getting inside.

 

J.

post #34 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by raytseng View Post

I don't think they're going to work especially well on something that is already wet.  Boot dryers are going to do a much better job, or even the poor man's way of using a hair dryers.  Silica gel is better for just keeping things that are already pretty dry that way-since they just removing moisture from the air, but don't do anything to promote changing the liquid water in the fabric into vapor (needs heat energy). If you are able to get your boots mostly dry  then stick these in, it may help more.

 

If you're going to use them to try to dry out boots in a locker, you'll probably need to stuff 2 if not more right into each boot to see any effect.  OR get silica gel in bulk and make your own packets with coffee filters or a sock or something.  The biggest effect is that while it may still remain damp, stuff in your locker might not get as smelly.

 

The other problem, is they are not going to be effective for multiple drying sessions, you're going to need to recharge them frequently, and also have a ziplock bag to stick them in to keep their remaining drying power.

 

I think I have some other use for it. The only down side is that the amount of time required to reactivate it. Thanks for the info.

post #35 of 40

Silica gel is a laughable waste of time.  The only way it would have *some* benefit is if you put lots of it AND your stuff into an airtight container in dry air.  You'd also have to have kept the silica gel in a watertight/airtight sealed container that you got from the factory or it's completely depleted by the time you really want to use it.

 

Silica gel can hold a tiny amount of water.  Where it's mostly used is in controlled humidity factories and then packaged with the product in airtight packaging to prevent condensation while shipping.

 

If you handle the stuff out in the free air, it's busy absorbing the humidity in the air which is essentially an endless supply of moisture.  You're just as well letting your stuff dry out in a dry and warm environment.

 

J.

post #36 of 40

Here's my thread on the subject:

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/120173/is-everyones-goggle-basically-a-blurry-mess-anyone-else-get-moisture-stuck-in-between-their-smith-lenses

 

Even if you get out the moisture, the inside surfaces of the lens that you can't get to may have water marks left over and even little pits that severely decrease visual acuity.

post #37 of 40


I had the same exact thing happen to me yesterday.  I did put them away in a bag after a day of riding.  They weren't extremely wet when stored away.  A little sweat probably.  Were you able to solve the problem by completely drying them out?  I'd rather not send them in for replacement; too long to wait without my favorite goggles.

post #38 of 40

Just leaving the out on a table or somthing(Out of the google bag) overnight is enough to dry them out well after most days. On a particularly wet day you want to take the lens out. The porex is very good at removing moisture, and If you have fogging problems on dry days than it may be an issue with the seal, but usually the goggles aren't dry. People tend to leave them in the goggle bag in their boot/ski bag which will not let the goggles dry or out of the boot/ski bag but still in the goggle bag. This was a big point from Oakley, I have a feeling it drives goggle companies insane when they get lenses back that werent dried well.

post #39 of 40


I have a feeling they weren't dried out on when I had a fogging issue on a dry day. I accidentally left them in the goggle bag after a day of hiking/skiing. Smith customer service didn't give me any solutions as far as drying them out, just that would gladly take them back. I'm going to dry them out and give it another go before I return the lens. I'm not knocking Smith's CS; that's probably their best response to a constant complaint. Thanks for the great info!

post #40 of 40
Thread Starter 

Funny to see this old thread I started get revived.  In recent years I've been using the Anon M2's with magnetic lens retention.  So much better not just for swapping lenses but also taking the time to remove them quickly at the end of the day to ensure they dry out.

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