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Clean Tracks

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 

Why is it that when I get forward and feel my boots pressuring the tips my railroad-track-like tracks on hero snow are thicker and not as clean as the pencil thin Lines I leave when I'm slightly in the back seat.  Am I over-bending the ski tips?

Inquiring minds want to know.

 

(Hey, VS, I beat you to it!wink.gif)

post #2 of 7

Yes.

post #3 of 7

Picture 007.jpg

Photographic proof of said over-bending ski tip.

post #4 of 7

is the ski tip really over bent? 

 

honestly i watch my own tracks as well as the local racers and other high end ski teachers. Most people are bending the skis and making wider tracks. Id say I wouldnt be concerned with out slope drawing. 

post #5 of 7

Slider,

 

If you're going to put that much weight on your outside ski, you might as well just snowboard.

post #6 of 7

Probably not.  What's probably happening is that your engagement at the top isn't clean enough so, while your ski is bending a bit, you're displacing a bent ski through a curved path, rather than cutting an arc along the edge.  It's still fun to do that, but you give up a lot of ski performance, speed, and grip.  I think it's more fun to be in the front seat and cutting an arc personally, but I'm still working on doing it consistently on steeper slopes.  I find it gets a lot harder as things get steeper.

 

You don't see much of that on the mountain.  A low-point friend was helping me out with doing this better a couple weeks ago, and the only guys he saw on the hill doing it well were the national team guys who were there that day.  They were far from the only ones training..

post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

Why is it that when I get forward and feel my boots pressuring the tips my railroad-track-like tracks on hero snow are thicker and not as clean as the pencil thin Lines I leave when I'm slightly in the back seat.  Am I over-bending the ski tips?

I wouldn't call it "over-bending" if the track looks like slider's photo because there it looks like the ski isn't bending... rather the ski is displacing snow instead of bending. The snow is soft enough to push aside before the tip begins bending significantly. (It's a little like the shearing of layers that happens in avalanche situations.)

It looks like too much pressure and edge angle for the line chosen. Someone whose skiing regularly causes such snow-shearing might find something interesting in a ski that is softer longitudinally while keeping some good torsional stiffness. Or might just prefer to lighten up on the pressure, and change the timing of the pressure and the edge angle.

Anyway, I'm not sure everyone thinks of the very same thing when reading the phrases "get forward" or "back seat." They're relative terms. For a tailgunner, "getting forward" may mean simply approaching a centered stance! And for someone who is maybe too aggressively on the shovels, "back seat" may simply mean going to center!
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