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Moving to Utah

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 

I'm moving to Utah and the Park City area.  What are the most versatile type of ski should a weekender invest in for those conditions out there.  I'm and inter to advanced that's looking forward to getting into some deeper stuff, but also spending time working in the piste with my 6 year old that's just getting started. We do plan on making Alta our home base.

 

Do you think that the Volkl Mantra is a good starting place to start comparing different brands?

 

Any advise will be apprciated.

post #2 of 26

Mid 90's at the waist seems to be the sweet spot for all mountain.  Personally, I think you'd be better served by two pair at 80ish and 110+?

Lot's of hard goods going on sale right now!

post #3 of 26
Thread Starter 

so possibly on pair at the mid 80 cent and a second pair at 100 cent?

 

Thanks for the advise: any advise on bindings?

 

I'll be out west in a month or so and plan on making those purchases then.

 

Tim

post #4 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pingi3 View Post

so possibly on pair at the mid 80 cent and a second pair at 100 cent?

 

Thanks for the advise: any advise on bindings?

 

I'll be out west in a month or so and plan on making those purchases then.

 

Tim


Don't over think the bindings. Everything is pretty good these days, and they don't know if you're skiing out east or out west. Personal prefer speaking only for myself is either Look/Rossignol/Dynastar or Tyrolia/Head. 

 

post #5 of 26
Thread Starter 

thanks!

post #6 of 26

I have skied Alta a lot over the years and have also owned two pr. of Mantras. For my tastes, that ski is not a good fit for deepish Utah snow. The reason is that it is very stiff (stiffest in it's width class) and thus it does not bend well in 3-D snow. The ~~ 94-100mm width class is a reasonable choice for a one ski quiver and there are many great ones. Given your skill level, I'd probably suggest staying away from some of the stiffer skis in that class (Mantra, Rossi Ex98, Salomon Sentinel) and concentrate on some skis with a more "medium flex". A few that come to mind are the Dynastar Legend 94, Blizzard Bonafide, Line Prophet 98 among others.

 

However, the suggestion of two pairs is very valid if you could swing it. Then you could get better conditions coverage for the days when it dumps big and also those days when it doesn't.

 

SJ

post #7 of 26
Thread Starter 

Again thanks for the advise, I really appreciate it.

 

Tim

post #8 of 26

I feel well qualified to answer this question since I live in Utah, ski the majority of my days on weekends, and have spent a lot of time over the last 8 years or so skiing with my kids.  As a bonus, I play with a set of Ping I3s during the golf season. 

 

I think the above advise is good in that the low to upper 90s is probably the current sweet spot for a one ski quiver in Utah.  I have a pair of Bonafides (98s) I picked up earlier this year that work really well.  In addition to those mentioned by Sierra Jim, some others to consider might be the Nordica Enforcer or Hell and Back, or the Head Rock and Roll (really good deals on this ski right now).  These types of skis are slightly biased to 3D snow use and tend to be less fun (but still very competent) on 2D snow than narrower, more piste oriented skis.

 

If you are going with more than one ski (and most of the people on this forum would suggest this route), you may want to consider a combination of a narrower, carving oriented ski with all mountain capability and a slightly fatter powder ski.  This disappointing snow year has reminded a lot of people of the utility of a ski that is more exciting on 2D snow.  If you were to combine that with a good, undemanding powder ski (like an S7 or a softer traditionally shaped ski with early rise) I think you would be pretty happy. 

 

If you are going to focus on Alta, the need for a harder snow capabilities is lessened.  If you are going to venture outside the Cottonwoods (ie. Park City areas, Snowbasin etc), harder snow capabilities become more important. 

 

Also, you didn't give your weight which, I believe, is pretty important in ski selection.  To a 250lb guy a Mantra may ski like a softer ski does fora 150lb guy.

post #9 of 26
Thread Starter 

Wow what good info.  205 Lbs working towards the 190 goal.

 

You picked up on the tag: I'm now hitting a Callaway X Forged and carry a 1.1 index if you ever need a partner :)  I'm sure that will go up in the next year or so.  Depending on the budget for the skis will determine the two ski route.  Maybe you can show me the  terrain when I get out there....

 

I'm trying to sell my motorcycle before the move so that I can completely outfit the family soup to nuts.  We have all the clothing it's just the hardware that's needed.

post #10 of 26
Thread Starter 

man i hate to sound like a total novice, but 2D/3D?  is that depth/weight?

 

thanks

 

Tim

post #11 of 26


3D = skiing in different snow depts ie powder skis move back forth side to side and up and down in deep snow,

2D= skking on packed snow back and forth side to side always on the same level
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pingi3 View Post

man i hate to sound like a total novice, but 2D/3D?  is that depth/weight?

 

thanks

 

Tim



 

post #12 of 26
Thread Starter 

ok dimensional.

 

got it...

post #13 of 26

 

Quote:

205 Lbs working towards the 190 goal

 

OK. I am 215 trying to get down to 200-205 so our weight is probably similar enough to compare.  I haven't skied the new Mantra with early rise but, based on reputation, I would think it may be a little stiffer than optimal for an Alta based skier at your stated skill level.  However, you see a lot of people on Mantras around here so I wouldn't discount the idea entirely.  I think all the other recommendations are still solid except the Super 7 may be preferable to the regular S7.

 

 

Quote:
 carry a 1.1 index if you ever need a partner :) 

 

Playing with me would only frustrate you.  I have not kept an index for the last few years and have cut my golfing time basically in half.  I was playing to about a 9 but it is at least several strokes (or more) worse now.

 

 

post #14 of 26
Thread Starter 

I play with double digit handicaps all the time.  golf is to have fun, I'm past my prime in that and I'm excited about getting to the mountains.  We live in Florida now and I've accepted a position that covers Utah, Idaho and Wyoming.

 

The Line Prophet 98s look promising as an option.

 

By the way what is the golfing "season" in Salt Lake and what type of putting surfaces are prevelant: Bent, poeanna, blue grass?

 

Tim

 

 

post #15 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pingi3 View Post

I play with double digit handicaps all the time.  golf is to have fun, I'm past my prime in that and I'm excited about getting to the mountains.  We live in Florida now and I've accepted a position that covers Utah, Idaho and Wyoming.

 

The Line Prophet 98s look promising as an option.

 

By the way what is the golfing "season" in Salt Lake and what type of putting surfaces are prevelant: Bent, poeanna, blue grass?

 

Tim

 

 

I know this is going off thread but have you ever played links golf in the uk?
post #16 of 26
Thread Starter 

It's my thread so it's ok with me.

 

I have never been to Europe so no.  I wish.

 

I've never skied Utah either, but that's going to change for sure.

post #17 of 26

 

Quote:

By the way what is the golfing "season" in Salt Lake and what type of putting surfaces are prevelant: Bent, poeanna, blue grass?

The golfing season in Salt Lake should start in a few weeks and last until late October to mid November.  Figure on about a month less on both ends in the mountains.  Almost all of our courses are bent grass.

 

I haven't skied the Prophet 98 but I like the Line skis I have tried and the 98 has a good reputation.

post #18 of 26

I am a pretty similar skier to you skill wise, and I have a pair of Atomic Accesses (100mm underfoot) that I absolutely love. Enough rocker up front to provide some float, enough camber underfoot to handle the groomers decently. I am 5'10' & I have skied both the 181 & 191. The 181 is more playful, the 191 a little more stable at higher speeds on groomers. It was one of the testers favorites in Skiing magazines 2011 gear guide. You can also find quite a few reviews about it online, I have never heard anyone give it a negative review. A good one ski quiver for out west in my opinion, with a great price (around $400 flat this time of year)

 

Here is what Atomic has to say about it.

Designed to introduce resort skiers to the benefits of rocker in soft and variable snow, the Access is predictable, versatile, and very easy to ski on anything from groomers to chopped-up powder. A generously rockered tip planes over powder and chunks, while underfoot camber and a GS-style turn radius give it hardpack-carving chops. Moderate flex is suitable for intermediates and casual experts looking to tackle deep snow and rugged terrain. And the Access’s light weight makes it ideal for uphill travel in the backcountry.

post #19 of 26

Here is an overview from Powder Magazine. Being a groomer oreinted Midwesterner, this is an easy wider ski to transtion into.

 

http://www.powdermag.com/buyers-guide-2011/2011-atomic-access-skis/

 

post #20 of 26

When you get out here check out 2nd Tracks .  It is a consignment  gear shop and they have good deals on lightly used gear.  usually high end stuff but also lots of kid/youth stuff.  this should make it easier to go the multi ski quiver route.

 

 

 

I do not work for them But I do sell gear there from time to time.smile.gif

 

Royal

post #21 of 26

I demo my skis a good 5-6 times trying

before I buy em.

But this year you should be getting a deal right?

 

post #22 of 26
Thread Starter 
Im going to Snowbird this weekend and staying near the airport because of work on Friday and Monday. Does anyone have a suggestion where I could demo skis this weekend with a possibility of purchasing a few sets (for the family) this summer near downtown that would be convenient to return sunday evening or first thing Monday morning?

What about discount lift tickets are their such a thing?

Thanks,

Tim
Pingi3
post #23 of 26

I demo the atomic access at snowbird late last year and loved them on powder (not so much on packed).  I asked when they will sell the old demo and was told that it would be late this season so you might want to check it out.

post #24 of 26
Thread Starter 

Everyone,

 

I really appreciate the advise this week.  I'm heading out tomorrow with a goal to learn about the area, because that is the reason for the visit.  Find our new home.

 

Secondly, have some fun learning about the mountains and the equipment.  I've learned a lot this week and now I need to find out what outfit/shop will let me demo one set of these skiis.

 

I'm going to ask the shop to demo any of these:

 

Dynastar Ledgend 94 

Blizzard Bonafide

Line Prophet 98

Nordica Endorcer or Hell and Back

Head- Rock and Roll

Atomic Access

 

Jim I'll catch up with you early next season on the Viice brand for my second set in my "quiver".

 

My question is who do any of you know who has these in a demo set potentially in the 181 length?

 

Thanks for the advice everyone.  If you want to PM me and reach out to me feel free, I'll be in town all weekend.

 

Tim

post #25 of 26

I'm pretty sure the Alta ski shop has the dynastar stuff. 

 

Royal

post #26 of 26

Your original post said Park City Area -- so you might want to check out the demo sales going on at the major rental shops up here as well.  And, off-topic, if you do end up settling in Park City or Jeremy Ranch, check out Park City Newcomer's Club http://www.parkcitynewcomers.org/ .

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