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Skiing with a Hydration Pack

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 

So I've not really skied with a Hydration pack. I usually drop into a lodge (Base , Mid or Top) for some water, both 'in' and 'out'... But some areas don;t really have convenient watering stops.

I mostly dislike having something on my back.

 

So I'm asking how people who ski with Hydration packs find them, deal with chair lifts, and the belting around the upper torso...

 

Have done the 'crushed water bottle partially filled' method and as with a water pouch, if it goes into a pocket or jacket sleeve, it always feels off-balance and pulls at the jacket ...

 

Course, suggestions for good, unobtrusive packs would be welcome...

post #2 of 25

I ski with one and don't even notice it for the most part.  The only time when I occasionally feel it is on lifts when I can't really sit up straight.  I've tried the bottle thing, but usually feel it the whole time and like you said feel off balance (not to a point where I feel like I'll crash, but I just feel it).  If you strap it nice and tight it should be no biggie while you are skiing.

post #3 of 25
You need to find pack that is comfortable to you. I.ve hiked hundreds of miles with the same backpack I ski witg so it has become second nature to have it. Mine is a light daypack with chest and waist straps, so it is fairly secur. On the chair you either need to be extra careful and just hook an arm across the back, ause the bar, or rotate your pack. Depends on the lift. Use common sense, and hopefully your paxk also manages loose straps well. There are also thinner/lighter packs geared towards skiing that you might like better.

I suppose it may also say something about your technique if you've reached the level where your torso stays relatively still while you are skiing
post #4 of 25

My wife picked up a small one (1Liter) for my birthday.  I skied with it under my jacket and never had a problem.  

post #5 of 25
post #6 of 25

I ski with an Osprey Kode 22 backpack which is really comfortable to ski with and a Source 3 litre hydration pack which I usually fill below half. It's extremely convenient and I can have a drink on a lift. On chairs I always flip it around to the front and carry it on one shoulder. I've done this ever since an unpleasant incident on an Italian rickety old chair many years ago I don't want to take the risk again. No problem when I'm skiing.

post #7 of 25
Dakine heli pro 20L with a 2L camelbak. Find a pack your comfortable with and get a hydration bladder for it. I've never been hooked on a chair lift, but I don't leave my straps dangling off my pack...
post #8 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by jimmy View Post

http://cascadedesigns.com/platypus/water-bottles/softbottle/product

 

.5L fits in goggle pocket very nicely.



My friend likes the 1L and just fills it halfway or less.  This is so he can fold it into a more squat shape than the .5L.

post #9 of 25

hmmm, I've got one of each, half a litre in the 1L probably would fit in a pocket better than a full .5L?

post #10 of 25

Dakine Heli, 11L, with 2L hydration bladder:

  • minimalist profile and no exposed straps on the back, I've not had a problem on chairs
  • there's just enough room for a spare layer and a pair of gloves, plus a separate, plush-lined goggle/glasses pocket
  • the chest strap is height adjustable... slide it up or down to where you want it
  • concealed mechanism for strapping skis on, makes for easier climbs in hike-to terrain
  • shovel pocket holds my Voile Mini
  • the bladder pulls out and reverses for cleaning/drying (2 liters is a lot of water, I fill it less than half full for a resort day; if it's cold I fill it with warm(ish) water to start)
  • the drinking tube runs down the INSIDE of the left shoulder strap, which keeps it invisible and helps stop it freezing; you access the nozzle via a zipper compartment on the front of the strap... geeky but it works

 

It has a lot of features for a really small pack.

 

post #11 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by DouglySkiRight View Post

Dakine Heli, 11L, with 2L hydration bladder:

  • minimalist profile and no exposed straps on the back, I've not had a problem on chairs
  • there's just enough room for a spare layer and a pair of gloves, plus a separate, plush-lined goggle/glasses pocket
  • the chest strap is height adjustable... slide it up or down to where you want it
  • concealed mechanism for strapping skis on, makes for easier climbs in hike-to terrain
  • shovel pocket holds my Voile Mini
  • the bladder pulls out and reverses for cleaning/drying (2 liters is a lot of water, I fill it less than half full for a resort day; if it's cold I fill it with warm(ish) water to start)
  • the drinking tube runs down the INSIDE of the left shoulder strap, which keeps it invisible and helps stop it freezing; you access the nozzle via a zipper compartment on the front of the strap... geeky but it works

 

It has a lot of features for a really small pack.

 

Pretty much my same setup. Always on unless I'm going to spend some time in the park. Really low profile. I use the an Osprey bladder that i find performs the best and stays flat on one side.
 

 

post #12 of 25

I like the Osprey Manta 30. Holds lots of gear, food, water and fits tight against the body.  Nothing gets caught up wearing this pack.  The Manta is my go to hydration pack for sure.  And if you have any issues with the pack, Osprey is a great company to work with.    

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post #13 of 25

If your only concern is hydration then I recommend going the Platypus collapsible bottle route.  Just get a small one and tuck it in the goggle pocket inside your jacket.  That's what I do and people don't even know it's there.

post #14 of 25

I've done the backpack/bladder thing and found it made me feel "soft."  I get that water is important and that it is worth some hassle but I've since found that taking a $0.99 water bottle from any given gas station or convenience store fits well into my ski pants pocket along side my knee.  No balance issues and I can refill it at lunch time or on any quick break at a water fountain or sink.

post #15 of 25

Noodler was that your bottle bumpfreaq ended up with?

post #16 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmourati View Post

I've done the backpack/bladder thing and found it made me feel "soft."  I get that water is important and that it is worth some hassle but I've since found that taking a $0.99 water bottle from any given gas station or convenience store fits well into my ski pants pocket along side my knee.  No balance issues and I can refill it at lunch time or on any quick break at a water fountain or sink.


What does feeling "soft" mean?  

 

post #17 of 25

I used to use a Camelbak MULE, but I wanted a little more storage for camera, camcorder and various other "dad" stuff.  I got the Dakine Heli, the small one, and I put a 70 oz. Camelbak bladder in it.  Works great.  I leave it on all the time, including on the chairlift.  It's thin enough that I still feel secure without the safety bar.  No problems to report.  The bonus is that I can use the diagonal carry mechanism to haul both kids' skis at the end of the day.

post #18 of 25

I use a Camelback Snowangel. Technically it's a women's pack, but the only difference I can figure is a little swirly graphic on it. It was $30 at a local shop, so I couldn't really beat it. The pack goes on under my shell jacket. On cold days (single digits or below), it goes under my soft shell. If I wear it on the outside, it will invariably freeze. Also, with it inside my jacket, I don't need to worry about stray straps or the pack catching on anything. I tuck the mouthpiece under the chest strap, so all I have to do is unzip my jacket a few inches, and pull the hose out. Makes for funny looks on the gondi when a hydration hose just seems to pop out of my chest, lol. I also always blow air back up the hose when I'm done drinking. The water in the hose will freeze before the water in the bladder, so I keep the hose as clear as possible. As far as convenience, it is very lightweight, and I hardly ever even notice it. In fact, when it is partially full, it makes a nice cushion against hard chairlift backs. The only time it bothers me is when its empty, then the base of the hose tends to dig into my back when I'm on a lift. But I don't wear it to keep it empty, so I try to keep it about half full.

post #19 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by raytseng View Post


What does feeling "soft" mean?  

 


Wimpy I guess.  Like I was geared up for something much gnarlier than a day at the resort.

post #20 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmourati View Post


Wimpy I guess.  Like I was geared up for something much gnarlier than a day at the resort.



Then you need to do more storm skiing where it's nice to have things like an extra set of gloves, goggles, and facemask. I also keep some snacks in mine to keep going when the weekend warriors decide they are ready to have their 50 dollar lunch.

post #21 of 25

I see a few options mentioned for the small Dakin Heli, which I own.  Any strong opinions on choosing one or the other for this pack?

post #22 of 25

I had a sandwich on the top of a mountain last weekend with a unobstructed panoramic view for miles.   

 

Yes, people were looking at me strange as I was sitting on my backpack on the side of a cattrack, but I for one enjoyed it better then crowding around the picnic tables at the lodge.

post #23 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by elduderino View Post

I see a few options mentioned for the small Dakin Heli, which I own.  Any strong opinions on choosing one or the other for this pack?



http://www.rei.com/product/796718/osprey-3l-hydraform-reservoir-100-fl-oz

post #24 of 25

I think everyone pretty much covered it.  I have a Camelbak ski backpack that's pretty similar to the Dakine Heli.  I like that better than a water bottle in my pocket because the weight's distributed better, and the pack's big enough for a spare layer, another set of gloves, another goggle lens, and even my SLR (although that starts to get a bit heavy).  If there isn't much in it, you hardly notice it's there.

 

The really slimline Camelbak (etc.) hydration packs will fit UNDER a ski jacket, but they only hold ~1L and don't have much if any storage space.

post #25 of 25

heli pro or osprey has some nice ones

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