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AHA moment in bumps?

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 

I may have encountered an "AHA" moment skiing bumps recently and would appreciate any comments.  I'm advanced, PSIA Level II wannabe (getting close), skiing on new Rossi Avenger 82TIs.  As a bump skier, I am, let's say, a work in progress.

 

But skiing last week in bumps in new broken snow, I found myself every 3rd turn or so pressuring almost 100% on the downhill ski at turn initiation and finding that the snap in the Rossis took me into the next turn with practically no effort.

 

I've always been told in bumps to keep my upper body facing downhill and to get out over the downhill ski at turn initiation.  I've worked on this but I kind of accidently found the other day that when I consciously "stood on" the downhill ski at that point (zero pressure on the uphill ski just for that instant), I got significant improvement in control and the confidence to go assertively into the next turn as opposed to being thrown into it.  I found that, in these instances (there weren't a lot of them and it happened near last chair so I didn't have the time or energy to work on it further), I also had greatly improved awareness of where my next turn was going to happen as opposed to just trying to manage the bump I was on at the moment.

 

So that's a longwinded lead-in to my question:  Did I experience an authentic AHA moment? i.e., did I dumb luck "back into" a tactic that I should consciously work into my bump development or would that be going down an alley that doesn't get me anywhere?

 

Thanks for any and all comments.

JoeB

post #2 of 27

New downhill ski, or moving over old downhill ski? Are you talking about early engagement/tipping of what will be the new downhill ski? 

 

 

post #3 of 27

I'm confused too... the ski that's "downhill" in the top half of a turn becomes "uphill" in the bottom half. Those terms always made skiing descriptions difficult for me to visualize.

 

Referring to the "inside" or "outside"ski is usually clearer. In any given turn, the same ski remains inside or outside throughout... much easier to understand, at least for me!

 

words.gif

 

Anyhoo, IF you're describing early engagement of the new inside ski, then yes, that's a useful skill. Active weighting/edging/steering of the inside ski isn't essential on groomed terrain. You can get away with standing on an edged outside ski and just letting an unweighted inside ski follow along passively. But in the bumps a passive inside ski will get tossed around and you'll be scrambling.

 

Actively weighting and pressuring the inside edge of the new inside ski gets your skis turning together and more quickly, which keeps you in contol of where they're going instead of being controlled. It's also impossible to do if you're in the back seat, so if you are doing it you're naturally centered or forward, which is where you want to be.

 

post #4 of 27

Joe,

 

Hard to tell for sure. Hopefully you'll get a guess here that fits your experience. I can think of two possibles off the bat:

1) you hit on retraction turns

2) you stopped standing on the new outside ski for turn initiation

 

Retraction turns  are the "big secret" for skiing well in the bumps. If you're starting your turns with your weight on your new inside ski, you could do be doing this with a down move instead of an extension move.

 

If your old go to move for turn initation was to extend off the new outside foot, this stepping move would be a real hindrance for performance in the bumps where we want both feet to work together more than to have a one-two move common to the stepping move.

post #5 of 27

Take my advice with a grain of salt, as I suck at bump skiing.  Nevertheless, I noticed yesterday while trying to regain some lost skills in some bumpy trees, after the foot of snow we had the day before, that I have come to believe two things when it comes to skiing in interesting terrain.

1) The outside ski needs to be commanded aggressively and gotten to the proper position and pressured to do the job.  Focus on this, yes.

2) Like a best supporting actor in a good movie, the inside ski must be there right along with the outside ski, lest 1) leads you into stemming your turns.

 

When alternating quick turns in succession, it often seems easier to get the skis into position; it's like one turn propels you to the next.

 

That is all.

post #6 of 27

90% of learning to ski bumps is skiing them in the first place and going in again.  Many wanna be bump skiers never get past the barrage of conflicting advice.  They are like oreo cookies,  you have to eat more than a few to get the full benefit. Keeping that thought in mind leads me to my next statement.

 

In the real world learning bumps is as much about experimentation as anything else.   If you bumped onto something that makes things easier and above all changes your perspective of the tactics, then I fail to see how that could be anything but positive.  Go with it next time you are out there.  You will figure out whether you need to add something else to make it work or take something away.

post #7 of 27

I'm not sure how you pressure the inside edge of the new inside ski?

 

IMO you want to be transferring weight/pressure from outside ski to outside ski through the turns....  To do this smoothly, you need to start transferring pressure early from old outside ski to new outside ski before the old turn has ended.  Getting the pressure to the new outside ski early really juices the top of the turn.  I can really feel the pressure progressively rolling from the little toe to the big toe on the new outside foot in the top of the turn.  It also feels more dynamic as the outside leg extends and the inside leg seems to naturally flex.  IMO this dynamic works well with both extension and retraction turns.  The primary difference between the two is where and when the edge change happens.  That was the point of the PSIA video that was being discussed in one of the other threads.

 

Starting the new turn with all of the weight on the old outside ski like it sounds like the OP is describing can make it hard for some people to release that ski.  It is the one that is supporting you and some people won't let that edge go.  When the new outside edge is released before the new inside edge, a wedge tends to open up and you get the 1 - 2 move that Rusty mentioned.  If the new inside ski is 100% weighted at initiation and that edge is released, you get a Whitepass type turn.  IMO a release of the new inside edge slightly before or simultaneous to the new outside edge combined with early weight transfer to the new outside ski gives you early pressure at the top of the turn and avoids the push off move Rusty is talking about.  
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DouglySkiRight View Post

I'm confused too... the ski that's "downhill" in the top half of a turn becomes "uphill" in the bottom half. Those terms always made skiing descriptions difficult for me to visualize.

 

Referring to the "inside" or "outside"ski is usually clearer. In any given turn, the same ski remains inside or outside throughout... much easier to understand, at least for me!

 

words.gif

 

Anyhoo, IF you're describing early engagement of the new inside ski, then yes, that's a useful skill. Active weighting/edging/steering of the inside ski isn't essential on groomed terrain. You can get away with standing on an edged outside ski and just letting an unweighted inside ski follow along passively. But in the bumps a passive inside ski will get tossed around and you'll be scrambling.

 

Actively weighting and pressuring the inside edge of the new inside ski gets your skis turning together and more quickly, which keeps you in contol of where they're going instead of being controlled. It's also impossible to do if you're in the back seat, so if you are doing it you're naturally centered or forward, which is where you want to be.

 



 

post #8 of 27

Hi JoeB.  Sounds like for you it was an "aha moment.  I'm pretty sure I understand what you are saying and employ a similar strategy for skiing the valleys in bumps - except, I set both ski's edges, not just the downhill one, (although the downhill one will have more pressure on it).  I find I enter bumps pointing straight down the fall line and like to stay that way, no meandering off to turn at every second bump (unless I cock it up of course!)  Hands held high and wide and just a small assertive move of the pole down onto the top of each bump for timing.  (Visualise the top of each bump as a ballon which you are going to pop with each pole plant). Knees and feet pretty close together, knees well bent and with a visual image of my knees being like pistons, rhythmically extending and retracting (watching an Olympic Moguls skier and visualising their leg movements is a good idea).  Initially, hold your hands at an exaggerated height and width and also really exaggerate the extension retraction of your legs - you can bring them to a more natural position later after you've got the hang of it. As my skis have a  20 metre turn radius I don't attempt to carve my way down.  It goes like this: set my inside edges to check speed and form a platform for the next turn - flatten ski - swivel and tip the knees into the turn - set inside edges - flatten ski - swivel and tip knees, etc, etc down the hill.  How much angle I use when I edge set at turn initiation is dependent on how steep the pitch is, the amount of rebound in the particular ski I'm on, and how fast or slow I want to go.  If you find your speed getting out of control it's because you aren't setting your edges hard enough at each turn initiation.

 

Good body angulation and a "quiet" upper body facing down the fall line are essential - it should all be happening from the hips down.  As the surface rises under your feet, retract your legs, but be sure to extend them again as the surface falls away at the back of the bump. (You can practice this by skiing at a shallow angle across a bumps slope several times in each direction.  As you get better at it steepen the angle across the slope and increase your speed.  Another good practice for bumps is getting a feel for your edges by skiing at a shallow angle across a pisted slope, alternately sliding sideways down the hill then setting your edges for a ski length or two then sliding sideways again - do it until you can get a rhythm going both ways and you feel confident with your edge set.)

 

So, thats just how I do it and it works for me.  Maybe others will shoot this process down or have better/different ways of attacking bumps. I'd like to hear how others manage this difficult but immensely rewarding part of skiing.  

 

 

post #9 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pierre View Post

90% of learning to ski bumps is skiing them in the first place and going in again.  


Pretty good bit of wisdom there, seems to me. True for learning lots of stuff - guitar, juggling, tennis. Ben Hogan said "dig it out of the dirt".

 

Dig it...out of...the snow.

 

Dig it?

post #10 of 27

Skiing bumps is more one footed than people think and the best advice I got came from my own experience of skiing with friends and other good bump skiers, not ski instructors. Ski instructors ski bumps like ski instructors not bump skiers. Chuck Martin, a championship bump skier, has a drill that uses an outside ski one footed dominance in moguls. You can find it on youtube. Go with your instincts and listen to what Pierre just said. I agree with him.

 

I really doubt that you were completely 100% on the downhill ski though, sure you weren't 75-25% ? Skiing bumps on one ski isn't fun.

post #11 of 27



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tetonpwdrjunkie View Post

I'm not sure how you pressure the inside edge of the new inside ski?

 

IMO you want to be transferring weight/pressure from outside ski to outside ski through the turns....  To do this smoothly, you need to start transferring pressure early from old outside ski to new outside ski before the old turn has ended.  Getting the pressure to the new outside ski early really juices the top of the turn.  I can really feel the pressure progressively rolling from the little toe to the big toe on the new outside foot in the top of the turn.  It also feels more dynamic as the outside leg extends and the inside leg seems to naturally flex.  IMO this dynamic works well with both extension and retraction turns.  The primary difference between the two is where and when the edge change happens.  That was the point of the PSIA video that was being discussed in one of the other threads.

 

Starting the new turn with all of the weight on the old outside ski like it sounds like the OP is describing can make it hard for some people to release that ski.  It is the one that is supporting you and some people won't let that edge go.  When the new outside edge is released before the new inside edge, a wedge tends to open up and you get the 1 - 2 move that Rusty mentioned.  If the new inside ski is 100% weighted at initiation and that edge is released, you get a Whitepass type turn.  IMO a release of the new inside edge slightly before or simultaneous to the new outside edge combined with early weight transfer to the new outside ski gives you early pressure at the top of the turn and avoids the push off move Rusty is talking about.  
 



 


tpj,

 

I dont' think we have any disagreement, because I agree with everything you posted. We may have different perceptions of where the OP is in his skill development.

 

I'm 100% with you on early engagement of the inside edge of the new outside ski. That's how I first moved into parallel ~25 years ago, under the tutelage of Lito Tejada-Flores' book 'Breakthrough on Skis'. That move was his mantra for skiers trying to break out of the intermediate rut of pre-stemmed, skid-and-match turns, and of course it works.

 

However, as as others on this thread have noted, focusing exclusively on that move can eventually lead some skiers to inside ski passivity and a sequential turn initiation. That's too slow for bump skiing. My sense was that the OP might have been in that phase but just discovered a new move that let him take inside ski awareness and control to the level needed for bump skiing.

 

Do you agree that 100% outside ski dominance, while viable on flat terrain, does not always work well in bumps, crud, powder, etc.?  Western skiers tend not to fall into this trap because they frequently encounter conditions requiring some degree of two-footed skiing. Eastern skiers, OTOH, can and often do get away with pure one-footed skiing for years and in fact often benefit from it, since it's easier to carve and hold on ice using one firmly pressured edge.

 

As to "how you pressure the inside edge of the new inside ski", you said it yourself: done as a pure exercise it leads to a White Pass. That's not a bad exercise for someone who's been over-reliant on the outside ski, which I thought the OP might be. In bumps, engaging the inside edge of the new inside ski simultaneously with the inside edge of the new outside ski requires total commitment to the new turn from the very beginning... just what we want.


 

 

post #12 of 27

Engaging the inside edge of the new inside ski simultanioulsy with the inside edge of the new outside ski will lead to a wedge or a crash.  I think what you mean to say is engage the outside edge of the new inside ski....  IE the LTE

post #13 of 27

Confused. th_dunno-1[1].gif

 

If I simultaneously roll both skis onto their new, inside edges, how will that lead to a wedge or crash?  When I do it it leads to a parallel turn with active (though not necessarily equal) edging, pressuring and steering of both skis.

 

This is what I think the OP may have discovered: early and active weighting, edging and steering of his inside as well as his outside ski. Previously, like many Eastern skiers (including me for many years), I believe he may have relied exclusively on early and active edging, pressuring and steering of his outside ski only, with his inside ski just meandering along for the ride.  That works on the groomed, not in the bumps.

 

Don't know what "LTE" is, sorry.

 

 

post #14 of 27

Um, OK, I think we have terminology issues again.

 

Can I use Little Toe Edge (LTE) and Big Toe Edge (BTE)?

 

So...I finish a turn (wherever "finish" might be, depending on bump shape, speed, intent, etc.) on the BTE of my old outside (downhill at the end of the turn) ski and the LTE of my old inside ski.

 

I release. I roll the skis toward their new edges. In bumps, generally the tips are allowed to drop downhill toward the fall line as soon as release is achieved, before the new edges are engaged. This is a pivot turn entry. If you don't like it, fine, but skiing bumps without the pivot entry, while certainly possible, generally requires more skill.

 

At any rate, as the tips drop downhill, the new inside foot (old outside foot) must remain active so that it steers as quickly as the new outside foot and the skis remain parallel. I suspect this is what the OP may have discovered. Or not.

 

It is not necessary to unweight the new inside foot instantly in many cases. It is quite possible, and may flow better, to allow the turn to pull you into your new outside foot as the turn develops. With that said, though, bump shape and the resulting tactics or intent may dictate a more rapid, but still progressive, pressuring of the new outside foot. For some cases, you may even want to be more on your new outside foot immediately upon release. It is a matter of intent, and every bump is different.

 

Release is achievable with both feet weighted. Or with either foot weighted. Unweighting is not necessary, although it can be fun and add to the dynamics of the turn. It is desirable for both skis to release at more-or-less the same time, and it is desirable for both new edges (inside edges in the new turn) to engage at the same time. It requires moving hips and knees down the hill to achieve simultaneous release of both skis. And it does require engagement of the LTE of the new inside ski when the new edges are engaged.

 

Depending on intent, tactics, etc., you (or I) may engage the new edges almost immediately at the very top of the turn, or you may add more steering before allowing the edges to engage. You may engage the edges solidly and obtain a near carve, or you may engage the edges more softly to allow yourself to smear the turn. Or anything in between. Every bump is a little different. That's what makes them so interesting.

 

Be wary of the firm edge set at the end of the turn. Although it may be useful, fun and dynamic, many people take this opportunity to stop their flow down the hill, and they may even push themselves uphill a little. This is a defensive move. Instead, use the edge set (if you're going to use it) to allow your upper body, knees and hips to move over the skis down the fall line so that you achieve release and flow easily into the next turn without a lot of effort or a defensive move.

 

I am strictly a recreational skier, not a competitive one. I don't do bumps in any kind of competitive style, usually. But the bumps are always fun and educational.

 

So have fun with them!

post #15 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lars View Post

Skiing bumps is more one footed than people think and the best advice I got came from my own experience of skiing with friends and other good bump skiers, not ski instructors. Ski instructors ski bumps like ski instructors not bump skiers. Chuck Martin, a championship bump skier, has a drill that uses an outside ski one footed dominance in moguls. You can find it on youtube. Go with your instincts and listen to what Pierre just said. I agree with him.

 

I really doubt that you were completely 100% on the downhill ski though, sure you weren't 75-25% ? Skiing bumps on one ski isn't fun.



 

 

Two things.

1. There are as many (if not more) ways to ski bumps as there are to ski any other part of the hill. Good skiers (including good ski instructors) can and do ski the bumps in a variety of ways depending on the desired outcome.

2. It seems to me that skiing bumps in the way pro bumpers do is fairly two footed in nature. I tried to find the Chuck Martin drill but couldn't. I'd love to see it. Watching video of Chuck Martin skiing he has a very narrow stance (as most zipper line skiers do), again suggesting significant two footed skiing. I would also suggest that there is more work going on rotating the skis than edging them to turn. (This may be a little off topic but it just got me thinking)

To the OP: I think any moment in your skiing where movements become easier and you are able to tackle terrain more confidently is certainly an "AHA" moment. These are the moments in my own progress that I savor. The question becomes what movements are you actually making that made this "AHA" moment possible.

Clearly it is hard to tell from description what is actually going on. I think a lot of what has been said makes sense depending on what line your are skiing through the bumps. It may also be that by pressuring the downhill ski you have actually moved out over it, which would make moving into the next turn much easier and put you more in balance for the next movements. Most important is to enjoy and build on that moment where you say "wow that was cool!"

post #16 of 27

In a parallel turn you are on one inside and one outside edge.  In a wedge turn you are on two inside edges.  In PSIA terms it's called opposing/inside edges and corresponding/inside outside edge.  I actually don't use these types of terms except when talking with my peers.  Students on snow don't need to be confused by jargon.  It's far more effective to demonstrate than to talk.  

 

I wouldn't disagree with the OP...  If he found something that he likes and it works for him, he should do it until he finds something better.  I'm always suspicious when I hear the certain words or terms used to describe skiing movements like... always, exclusively, or 100%.  I would also observe that the OP is a self described PSIA level 2 wannabe.  IMO he might be interested in what a fellow ski instructor has to say on the issue and should be on board with the language that's used among peers to describe skiing movements.  BTW LTE and BTE, ILS and others are not PSIA terms, although PSIA seems to get blamed for them and the confusion they cause here.  These are terms/abbreviations that I have only ever seen used on this board, where they seem to be used quite a lot.  Sorry for the confusion.

 

BTW..  Just passed PSIA level 2 Telemark today.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DouglySkiRight View Post

Confused. th_dunno-1[1].gif

 

If I simultaneously roll both skis onto their new, inside edges, how will that lead to a wedge or crash?  When I do it it leads to a parallel turn with active (though not necessarily equal) edging, pressuring and steering of both skis.

 

This is what I think the OP may have discovered: early and active weighting, edging and steering of his inside as well as his outside ski. Previously, like many Eastern skiers (including me for many years), I believe he may have relied exclusively on early and active edging, pressuring and steering of his outside ski only, with his inside ski just meandering along for the ride.  That works on the groomed, not in the bumps.

 

Don't know what "LTE" is, sorry.

 

 



 

post #17 of 27

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by tetonpwdrjunkie View Post

In a parallel turn you are on one inside and one outside edge.  In a wedge turn you are on two inside edges.  In PSIA terms it's called opposing/inside edges and corresponding/inside outside edge.  I actually don't use these types of terms except when talking with my peers.  Students on snow don't need to be confused by jargon.  It's far more effective to demonstrate than to talk.  

 

I wouldn't disagree with the OP...  If he found something that he likes and it works for him, he should do it until he finds something better.  I'm always suspicious when I hear the certain words or terms used to describe skiing movements like... always, exclusively, or 100%.  I would also observe that the OP is a self described PSIA level 2 wannabe.  IMO he might be interested in what a fellow ski instructor has to say on the issue and should be on board with the language that's used among peers to describe skiing movements.  BTW LTE and BTE, ILS and others are not PSIA terms, although PSIA seems to get blamed for them and the confusion they cause here.  These are terms/abbreviations that I have only ever seen used on this board, where they seem to be used quite a lot.  Sorry for the confusion.

 

BTW..  Just passed PSIA level 2 Telemark today.
 



 


Congrats on passing your L2 Tele!!

 

I'm clear on the terminology now, thanks. We were saying the same things (just differently). By "inside edge" you meant the BTE, regardless of which way we're turning, while I meant the edge that's on the inside of the turn, which is the LTE of the inside ski. Just garbled definitions.

 

Your usage is clearer and LTE/BTE seems clearer yet once the acronym's understood. Sorry for the confusion.

 

**

Totally agree that any AHA! moment should be pursued, not only to enjoy but to learn whatever we can from it.

 

 

 

post #18 of 27

Personally, skiing bumps is blend of aha moments followed very quickly by an aw sh** moments. The goal is to have more aha moments in a given run. This is what makes bump skiing fun.

post #19 of 27

^^^Like that!  icon14.gif

 

Skiing bumps, (skiing in general, but bumps in particular), also reminds me of the old bit of boxing wisdom...

 

Everybody's got a plan, until they get hit!

 

When you first start skiing bumps, even if you've read and/or been told/shown some things, it all comes at you very, very fast, and you get popped real quick!

 

OK, here I go. Gonna stay tall and forward, keep my upper body quiet and pointing down the hill, turn my skis under me, flex and absorb as I make contact with the front side of the bump, then let my skis...AW SH*T!!

 

So you find a hill that will play nice, one that will let you spar with it trying to utilize all the tips and tactics you've come across. And you still get smacked around, but not too badly, and you make some progress. Time slows down a bit - you start to see and feel the hill before it's by you completely. You're starting to put it all together (a little), so you hop up a weight class, and...AW SH*IT!

 

But you keep coming back for more...and ain't that what it's all about?  ;-)

post #20 of 27

The comments are all good.    I have never met a bump I did not like although in my older age I have shopped a few runs beercheer.gif

post #21 of 27

A Ha moments in bump skiing--

--Get the body squared facing downhill before the skis reach the fall line.

--Have the pole ready to plant by the time the skis reach the fall line.  You can plant and turn where ever looks good without wasting time to prepare.  Keep the pole tip a coupl'a inches off the snow down the fall line from your boot ready to plant.

--Look one or two bumps ahead of the one you're on to pick each short section of a line.

--Pull both feet strongly back as you crest over a bump:  rule of thumb...if your ski tips are off the snow, you have no control.  Pull the skis back to get the tips down for control.

--Do these and you crash:

----Rotate the arms & shoulders around in the direction of the turn.icon13.gif

----Sit back on your heels.icon13.gif

----Lean back toward the hill.icon13.gif

post #22 of 27


OK my bump skiing sucks too but now it sucks a little less:
 

Quote:

--Look one or two bumps ahead of the one you're on to pick each short section of a line.

 


This was a recent aha moment for me. I'd been told this for years, but I just couldn't seem to look beyond the very next bump. Like hiking over rocky terrain but not looking down at your feet. But recently, I somehow forced myself to and WOW everything went into a kind of perceptual slow motion. And because of that it was much smoother and there weren't any Oh $h1t moments (or fewer anyhow). It takes discipline because when I do it i'm so damn proud of myself, I forget to look at the next two or so turns. You have to keep forcing those eyes down hill.

 

And, the beauty of this is it works no matter what other technique you want to employ.

 

enjoy...
 

 

post #23 of 27

Way to go Mom! Soon you'll be seeing them in sets (groups of bumps or 3-4 turns as a single path/line) instead of twos. At that point you won't have to force yourself to look ahead.

 

One element of my bump teaching is skiing "on automatic" through the set while focusing on a problem at the end of the set. then you ski on automatic through the problem while finding the next set. The first step is being able to see the set of "easy" turns. The next step is recognizing the different types of problem bumps. The final step is developing a bag of tricks to deal with each type of problem. When you can approach a problem bump thinking of a choice between plan a, plan b or plan c, then you can execute getting over the problem bump "on automatic". Then you will have time to spot the next set while getting over the problem. When every (other) bump is a problem, you don't have time to plan ahead and you won't have time to see the "line" or "next set". Seeing two bumps is a step in the right direction. Don't worry about remembering to look ahead. Just try to see 3 instead of 2.

post #24 of 27

Quote:

Originally Posted by DouglySkiRight View Post

I'm clear on the terminology now, thanks. We were saying the same things (just differently). By "inside edge" you meant the BTE, regardless of which way we're turning, while I meant the edge that's on the inside of the turn, which is the LTE of the inside ski. Just garbled definitions.

 

Your usage is clearer and LTE/BTE seems clearer yet once the acronym's understood. Sorry for the confusion.

 

The easiest way to think about inside/outside feet versus edges: 

 

inside/outside feet and skis are relative to the turn. (the outside foot/ski is always farthest outside the arc.)

 

inside/outside edges are relative to your body. (the inside edges are always under your arches. Outsides are always at your little toes.) 

 

This same language applies in skiing, ice skating, inline skating, etc. (it tends to be a source of confusion in each sport for the uninitiated. Just posting this for other people who may have been similarly confused. I recognize you're clear personally tho.)

post #25 of 27

So now that the whole inside verse outside thing is settled I will try to get back to JoeB and hopefully some more AHA moments.

 

As other people have mentioned there are many effective styles to ski bumps. You mentioned (JoeB) you are actively seeking your next level with P.S.I.A.. I would suggest you remain focused on the approach the P.S.I.A. is going but remain open to other concepts. Remember on you next set of exams the examiners will want you to ski the way they see it.

 

It's hard for me to visualize what the heck you were doing within your skiing in your first posting. One note of caution though. You not not want to get caught with you balance too far inside. Recovery is a bitch and your timing for the next bump could be compromised. Playing catchup creates desperation and takes away from balanced performance.

 

Here are some Tactics that hopefully can set you up for some more AHA's.

 

- Spend sometime improving short turns on groomed slopes. Ski it moderate and super steep terrain on piste.

- Set yourself a goal at the beginning of each run. Example- I going to ski this bump run on a smooth path down a narrow corridor.

  I can achieve this by How?  Remain active with my lower body or looking ahead or a solid pole plant or whatever you feel you need.

- Ski the bumps with your piers. Session lots.

- Ski the crap. Ice bumps, slush, dust on crust and adapt to the terrain conditions.

- Skid some turns and carve others.

- Use the whole bump, Front, sides and back.

- Start your run skiing slowly. Once you feel more balanced and some rhythm amp it up and let er rip.

 

There are more ideas but I will leave you with these ones for now. Cheers and have fun!!!!!!

 

Tek Head

 

 

post #26 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek Head View Post

 

- Ski the bumps with your piers.


I dunno, I usually leave piers in the lake with boats tied to them... biggrin.gif  Sorry, couldn't resist.

 

Now, back when I skied at Mary Jane, I skied bumps with my peers quite a bit. I also skied bumps with people who were much, much better than I ever will be. I would encourage you to do the same. Be careful about who you think is "better," though. Some may look good to you, but may be "one trick ponies" or have various technique issues that are not evident to you.
 

 

post #27 of 27



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek Head View Post

- Spend sometime improving short turns on groomed slopes. Ski it moderate and super steep terrain on piste. My typical first run warmup: find a long, steep groomer and whip smooth, continuous, short-radius turns all the way down. Gets the blood AND the rhythm flowing.

 

- Set yourself a goal at the beginning of each run. Example- I going to ski this bump run on a smooth path down a narrow corridor.

  I can achieve this by How?  Remain active with my lower body or looking ahead or a solid pole plant or whatever you feel you need. Agree. If you ski with nothing particular in mind, nothing particular will improve.

 

- Ski the bumps with your piers. Session lots. LOL, what jhcooley said ^^^.

 

- Ski the crap. Ice bumps, slush, dust on crust and adapt to the terrain conditions. Yup. I've always enjoyed skiing crap, funky or even barely existent snow. It fills your bag of tricks and prevents panic when conditions turn crazy. This is why Eastern skiers adapt quickly to Western conditions while Western skiers whine if they have to ski anything less than a foot of fresh. I've lost count of how many times I've heard Western locals complaining about what they call "ice", ROFL.

duck.gif

 

- Skid some turns and carve others. The more arrows in your quiver, the more targets you can hit.

 

- Use the whole bump, Front, sides and back. Over, under, around and through - having choices is good for you!

 

- Start your run skiing slowly. Once you feel more balanced and some rhythm amp it up and let er rip. AGREED. Unless you're a competition bumper, launching into a difficult line at full speed risks getting behind and out of control. It's much easier to ramp it up from a controlled pace than to dial it back and regain composure after losing it. (Note: "slow", "fast", "full speed", etc. mean whatever FEELS slow, fast or full speed to you.)

 


Good tips. Here's one more (credit to Dory/Ellen Degeneres, from 'Finding Nemo'):

 

  - Once you have a good vibe going and the turns are flowing, ski like Dory - just keep swimming, swimming, swimming... smile.gif

 

Don't stop to pick a turn, to admire the view or because your quads hurt - JUST KEEP SKIING. A good vibe will pick the turns for you, there's no better view than the line you just ripped and you can rest your poor quads on the chair.

 

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