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Getting my ski boots to fit on a pair of used skis

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 

I scooped an older pair of Rossignol Dualtec Generation 9X with Solomon 997 Equipe Drivers, ( both skis and bindings are yellow and black). My old Nordica boots are just a tad too long, so I need to adjust the bindings.

 

The heel section appears to sit on aluminum tracks or slides and are held in place by a pair of impossible to reach Phillips screws.  I'd rather not remount the whole binding.  If I'm wrong about these screws allowing the heel to move back, does anyone have an idea of how to move the heels back?  And if I'm correct that these are the screws I need to move to slide the heel back, does anyone have an idea how to access them.  When I try to put a screwdriver to 'em the entire heel piece is in the way.  Hmmn...

post #2 of 22

Take it to a ski shop.

post #3 of 22

Spend the twenty bucks and save a trip to the hospital.

post #4 of 22

I don't have that binding, but most bindings have a track with slots in it and a spring that clicks a tab into the slots on the track, allowing some fore-aft movement without the need for a re-mount.  Finish the adjustment by adjusting forward pressure.

 

Be patient, someone with more 997 knowledge should chime in soon.

 

How far back from the mounting line will the longer boots put you?

post #5 of 22
Thread Starter 

Thanks for your response.

Overall the heel would move back perhaps 1/8 or 3/16s at the most.  Not sure about the mounting line distance but I am only travelling back a bit on the tracks.

post #6 of 22
Thread Starter 

You're probably right, thanks.

post #7 of 22
Thread Starter 

Yeah, I'm sure you are right, too.  Thanks for your reply.

post #8 of 22

A shop won't touch those I think but it's a good binding unless you want to be able to sue someone. There is either a tab as mentioned or a large slotted screw about the size of a nickle (worm screw) at the back to adjust. You adjust the binding so that the little arrow lines up somewhere inside the index box at the heel base when your boot is in. You also need to adjust the toe wings (is there a slotted screw on both sides or only one side?) and toe height for you boot. It's not rocket science but you need to know what you doing. What is the max DIN on the binding?

 

You can cruise though this and learn

 

http://www.tetongravity.com/forums/showthread.php/82360-Sally-997-977-916-920-900s-912-914-etc-thread-all-u-ever-wanted-to-know?highlight=salomon

 

 

post #9 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post

I don't have that binding, but most bindings have a track with slots in it and a spring that clicks a tab into the slots on the track, allowing some fore-aft movement without the need for a re-mount.  Finish the adjustment by adjusting forward pressure.

Here is my question: How do rental shops do it? Are rental bindings any different, or is it just left alone?

post #10 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by flatlandr View Post

Here is my question: How do rental shops do it? Are rental bindings any different, or is it just left alone?



Yes, many rental bindings have a slide at the heel to fit a larger range of boot sizes. Having your boot mounted "spot on" the correct point on the ski only matters if you are an expert skier IMO. Then you are probably not renting skis. Or you are a better than expert like Glen Plake and could ski on barrel staves with leather straps and make most of us look like a gapper.


Edited by wooley12 - 3/4/12 at 6:35pm
post #11 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by flatlandr View Post

Here is my question: How do rental shops do it? Are rental bindings any different, or is it just left alone?


You work at a ski area. Go into the rental shop and find out what they do. It's important for an instructor to know this stuff. Learn it.

post #12 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post


You work at a ski area. Go into the rental shop and find out what they do. It's important for an instructor to know this stuff. Learn it.



Better yet, ski rentals for a day so you know what most of your students are dealing with.

post #13 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by wooley12 View Post



Yes, many rental bindings have a slide at the heel to fit a larger range of boot sizes. Having your boot mounted "spot on" the correct point on the ski only maters if you are an expert skier IMO. Then you are probably not renting skis. Or you are a better than expert like Glen Plake and could ski on barrel staves with leather straps and make most of us look like a gapper.


I meant forward pressure adjustment, not the sliding heel & toe. I've worked a couple times in rentals when others were sick, nobody seems to pay any attention to it. Then again, what you say about renters is true. I don't even pay much attention to forward pressure on MY bindings. It just makes me wonder if an improper forward pressure adjustment could lead to injury...

 

post #14 of 22

Skiing may lead to injury  smile.gif

 

I've watched rental shops set up a ski and 1st they adjust the heel to fit the boot sole length and then check the forward pressure and micro adjust to make that is in the acceptable range. If they are doing it correctly. Good call for an instructor to know the whole scene so he's not yelling technique when it is an equipment issue.

 

Right now I'm bouncing back and forth from here to my basement shop where I'm mounting some  some 15 y o Fischer Alltrax Expeditions and Look P10's with a template I made for a fling at the local knob tomorrow.

 

If the forward pressure is off so is the stated DIN.


Edited by wooley12 - 3/4/12 at 6:47pm
post #15 of 22

Back to the OP. If you're only off by 3/16", it could be your toe is not adjusted to the boot. The toe of your boot should touch the little white pad on the binding toe piece. If it's not, the wings are too tight.

 

Edited because the gawdam keyboard is acting up.

post #16 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by flatlandr View Post


I meant forward pressure adjustment, not the sliding heel & toe. I've worked a couple times in rentals when others were sick, nobody seems to pay any attention to it. Then again, what you say about renters is true. I don't even pay much attention to forward pressure on MY bindings. It just makes me wonder if an improper forward pressure adjustment could lead to injury...

 

Where do you work?
 

 

post #17 of 22

Most 'normal' rental shops are using a system of boots, skis and bindings that are from the same manufacturer, they are designed to be incredibly easy to work with quickly. The boots and the bindings are coded so the tech sees, say, the color purple and 'D' so they know to set the toe at the purple line and the heel at 'D' then they set the DIN. Forward pressure is going to be correct without micro adjustment because the binding and boots are set-up to interface.

post #18 of 22
Thread Starter 

Hey Wooley12,

 

Thanks for the response.  I do have the large worm screw, though I've found it unmovable so far - I need to trek out to the barn to find a really big screwdriver.  And the toe piece has screws on either side of the wings.  The DIN appears to be 14, as that is the highest number I can read on both heel and toe bindings.  I agree that it isn't rocket science, but depite having skiied for more years than I care to count, I've always bought or used skiis that required no adjustments - this is new territory and I don't want to muck it up because a) there's no one to sue, and b) more seriously - I don't want to break a leg or kill myself.  People are killing themselves around here skiiing this year.  Two I think, nearby.  I'm in Ontario and the hills are just hills,not mountains.  Anyway, I am rambling.  Off work with a sick kiddie.  Excellent, really. 

post #19 of 22

Make sure that the toe wings are open enough so they are not touching the boot. Then loosen the large screw on top of the toe. Put a piece of paper under your boot toe. Tighten the big toe screw down until you feel some resistance when you tug on the paper. Then tighten the toe wings down just enough to touch the sides of the boot toe. They strip fairly easy.  Gotta go skiing now on some skis I mounted last night.

 

Hope the kid feels better soon.

 

 

post #20 of 22
Thread Starter 

Hey Wooley12

 

Thanks for the intel; I'll try this out and let you know if it all worked.  Hope skiiing the knob worked out today on the old Fischers.  My first skis were Fischer ALU steel - had to be 35 - 40 years ago.  Possibly with Look Nevada bindings.  Takes me way way back. They were probably 210s - fast as spit.

 

.

post #21 of 22

Just checked at work. The boots, skis and bindings are system, forward pressure is pre-adjusted for each shell size indicated on the binding. Makes sense actually. Good to see that we aren't doing something terribly wrong.

post #22 of 22

I'm back with all my limbs, tissue and tendons in working order. 1/2 day with the Look/Fischer's and 1/2 with a Megaride/Dynafit/Shuksan for comfort and slow cruising.

They were testing instructors today. Watching them come down enmasse reminded me of a school of fish. Wish I could ski that pretty.

 

Here's a link to the manual for some info

 

http://www.salomoncertification.com/manuals/SPM_07_ENvCD.pdf

 

More here

 

http://www.tetongravity.com/forums/showthread.php/62509-Setting-997-equipe-forward-pressure

 

Use at your own discretion. While I've bought and resold a number of those worm screw Salomons but never mounted any for myself. I ski at a 5.5 DIN.


Edited by wooley12 - 3/6/12 at 2:55pm
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