or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Beginner Zone › Video critique please!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Video critique please!

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

so this is my first season and I feel like I have hit a plateau.  I want to continue improving and maybe this video will help you guys diagnose what I can do to improve my parallel turns.

 

I feel like I can stay leaning forward with good form (relative smile.gif) on groomed runs but if there is choppy snow that isn't groomed (or fresh pow that's been run through a bunch), I find myself putting pressure on the back of my boots despite my efforts.  

 

I also find that often times my downhill leg is straight when completing my turns.  This may or may not be related to my downhill ski chattering sometimes as I finish my turns.

 

In one of my lessons, we talked about your body being in a C-shape with the three points of alignment.  I can't figure it out! 

 

I hope this video can help you guys see what I'm doing wrong!

 

post #2 of 16

Hello Cmick and welcome to EPIC SKI,

youve come to the right place for info and guidence everyone is very helpful and welcoming, I'm no ski coach so im not in any position to tell you anything but i can see clearly your sat toooooo far back and hands/arms are not in good form,

post #3 of 16

Cmick, good for you for your 1st season, looking at the video you should try to keep your feet under your upper body more by either pulling the feet back or getting the butt over your feet more. You need more ankle flex and less knee flex. The stiff downhill leg you mention is a cause of the lack of movement in your ankles, putting you in the "back seat". Also uneven variable snow will push your calves into the back of the boot. There is always a constant adjustment process going on to stay in the sweet spot of the skis, beginners use macro adjustments mostly upper body hands shoulders, spine. As you proceed along the learning curve you start to learn to keep in balance ( micro adjustments) with the lower extremities, hip, knee, ankle and toes.

One thing that you can do is to get on level to very shallow angle terrain and try skating, the flexing and extending you need to do in order to skate will help  you develop a feel for the boot and get you in the right spot, you will soon realize you will not be able to skate at least anywhere efficiently if you feel pressure in the calf on the back of the boot. Take that flexing and extending feeling into skiing and see how it feels while making turns. Play with variations of skating, down hill. up hill across the hill. Try using all 4 edges while skating, you will really develop a feel for the boot/ski/edge/snow interaction with skating. Have fun and keep at it.

post #4 of 16

Hi Cmick. First of all don't worry too much about plateaux. They're necessary stages to consolidate skills and prepare you for the next progression.

Without going into massive detail which I don't think would be terrribly helpful for you, there are 2 things I think will help with your progress. Firstly and the most common problem for novice skiers is your stance on your skis. At 21 seconds you can see your ankles have no flex pushing the hips back. It is worth going into some really easy terrain where straight line speed is not an issue and do some work initially in a straight line to help you get balanced and centred over your skis. Before you slide make sure you are balanced. Ankles, knees and hips flexed, hands forward. Feel where your balance point is on the base of your foot. You should feel it through the arch just behid the balls of your feet. Now do some sliding. Bend and stretch as you slide and maintain this balanced stance as you flex and extend your joints equally. Progress the flexing and extending to make some little hops, landing softly and balanced. Now maintaining this balanced stance, alternately lift either ski off the snow. This may seem like you are going back in your progression but these and other similar exercises are good for any skier. The great Georges Joubert whilst conceding it to be commercial suicide for ski schools, maintained that several days spent doing these kind of things would ultimately accelerate the learning of skiers.

Now take this new found balance and make some easy turns on the same easy terrain. Pay particular attention to your arms. Don't allow them to drop back. Think about making the turning effort come from your legs. This is the 2nd fault in your skiing and linked in no small way to the first. If you look at the first turns you can see in the video, there is a lot of rotation in the upper body. Your hips and shoulders are swinging and muscling the skis round the turn. Whilst the upper body has the biggeest part of your body mass and therefore making getting the skis round easy, turning like this is very detremental to your effectiveness. You end up out of balance and unable to use the skis properly.

With a good stance it becomes much easier to rotate the femur in the hip socket and turn the skis with the legs. When you make your turns make sure to keep your inside arm and shoulder from dropping into the turn. Keep them up. Keep your your core strong and allow your legs to turn underneath you.

Take your time building a solid foundation for your technique. As I say plateaux should not be viewed negatively. You are early in your development and doing really well. Watch good skiers. Talk to them. Read lots and take lessons from good instructors.

Good luck.

post #5 of 16
You are finding out that skiing can become addictive, Cmick. I got hooked in 1945 and still can't get enough.

What I see in your video is a number of movements very typical for new skiers who have gotten past the initial hesitations of sliding and are starting to "go or it".

You are beginning turns by stepping onto the new outside ski (left ski in a right turn) and swinging your outside arm and shoulder toward the turn direction. That means you mostly are skiing from the top down. More experience and instruction should lead you to beginning turns by releasing the edges and combining tipping and steering to complete them--skiing from the bottom up.

The "C" you heard about is a body position in which the pelvis is more inside the turn than the feet and shoulders. It's called angulation and it's a way of increasing your edging after establishing initial edging by tipping your feet.

It's a fun journey that is best taken with some professional guidance.
post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 

This is great guys. Thanks for the tips. I will need to read over these a bunch to soak everything in. I can't wait to go practice on Monday!

post #7 of 16
Thread Starter 

This is great guys. Thanks for the tips. I will need to read over these a bunch to soak everything in. I can't wait to go practice on Monday!

post #8 of 16
Thread Starter 

In my skiing class, my instructor never taught me much about hand/arm position.  I see people do the pole plant and I try to copy them.

post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cmick View Post

In my skiing class, my instructor never taught me much about hand/arm position.  I see people do the pole plant and I try to copy them.



very important to keep arms up and use wrists to plant the pole, helps keep in ballance

 

post #10 of 16

It's good to see renewed activity here in the Beginners boards. This thread interests me, too, because I'm a first-year skier who has become quite comfortable on groomed runs and totally miserable in heavy, cut up snow. I have a really hard time getting my skis to turn in the heavy stuff, and the inconsistent surfaces make it quite a struggle to stay in control.  Cmick's video reminds me of myself (I'm worse though, I'm sure) so I think these tips will help me, too. So thank you.

post #11 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by slipshod View Post

It's good to see renewed activity here in the Beginners boards. This thread interests me, too, because I'm a first-year skier who has become quite comfortable on groomed runs and totally miserable in heavy, cut up snow. I have a really hard time getting my skis to turn in the heavy stuff, and the inconsistent surfaces make it quite a struggle to stay in control.  Cmick's video reminds me of myself (I'm worse though, I'm sure) so I think these tips will help me, too. So thank you.


Try to tip onto your edges and slice through that stuff rather than turn/ twist skis. Tip 1st then turn/twist as needed to change your line. Skating helps you feel where your ski edges engage the snow and how much you have to tip your legs in order to engage the edges.

 

post #12 of 16

Yes, you are pulling yourself around with the new outside hand...swinging the right hand around to make a left turn.  Bad news.  At this point in your skiing, you want to do nothing with your upper body except balance.

 

You need to learn to ski with your feet.  Right now you're kicking your heels out and bracing yourself on the downhill ski while you're leaning back toward the hill heavy on your uphill ski.

 

Try this on green terrain that is easy for you---preparing for a right turn, hold your self stationary, balance over the ball of your left foot, lift the tail of your right ski (tail only) off the snow an inch or two, keep the ski tips even.  You'll find that a stance width equal to your hip width works well.  Next, aim a bit downhill, do exactly the same thing, and turn your feet to the right to make your skis turn right.  Just balance with your upper body while your zipper continues to face downhill (never in the direction you're turning).  Ski in a curve to the right until you stop.  Do it again at a slightly steeper angle.  And again.  And again.  When you run out of hill, do several to the left.  You are learning these very important things--balance of the ball of the outside foot, stay very light on the inside foot, make round turns, turn with your feet, not your arms & shoulders.  Continue these past the point where you're totally bored.  Now, on very easy terrain, link these turns.  Be sure to lighten the downhill foot at the end of one turn and the first thing at the beginning of the next turn.  This is the first movement to start the turn--switch your weight from the old outside foot to the uphill foot which in a moment will become your new outside foot.  As soon as you're lightened the old outside foot and balanced over the ball of your new outside foot, turn that foot under your body without cranking around your arms & shoulders.  As you're ending a right turn, now balanced over your left ball of the foot, move your balance to the ball of the right foot, lift the tail-only of the left foot an inch off the snow, and turn your right foot under your body to make a left turn.  Continue balancing on the ball of your right foot through the left turn.  Continue this drill until you are past totally bored, then gradually increase the difficulty of the terrain.  If you revert to your old habits, deduct one beer from your end-of-day allowance and return to easier terrain.

 

When skiing for real, we do not lift the ski but we do want to lighten it by shifting our weight.

 

 

Slipshod

In deeper snow, we do not want to rely on twisting the feet around to turn the skis.  A more advanced movement, but not contradictory to what I listed above, is to roll your skis on edge, especially the inside ski, so the edged skis bank around the turn in the snow (not on the snow) and the skis turn you.  You don't turn your skis.  Also, if you aren't skiing on a firm base, you want equal weight on both feet.  Cmick isn't yet ready for this stage, but when he gets balanced over his skis and no longer pulls himself around with his arm & shoulder, he will be ready. 

post #13 of 16

Thanks, snowbowler and tiredknees. I'm at the stage where I turn parallel, but I'd hardly call it carving. I balance almost entirely on the outside ski and just let the inside ski follow along with very little weight on it. I gather the inside ski should play a greater role in heavier or deeper snow, but at this stage all it does is try to trip me if I put significant weight on it. I know I need another lesson to get past this stage, but it may have to wait until next season. Yesterday the hill was half slush, and we're looking at 70 degrees and rain today and summer weather for the rest of the week. frown.gif

post #14 of 16

slipshod with that type of condition you are describing you would be better off to wait until next year. This is the condition on the east coast now and in this stuff you really want to be able to slice thru not twist and push snow. That skiing can lead to shredded knees. Next year will get better snow in the east it has to right? Good luck to you.

post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowbowler View Post

slipshod with that type of condition you are describing you would be better off to wait until next year. This is the condition on the east coast now and in this stuff you really want to be able to slice thru not twist and push snow. That skiing can lead to shredded knees. Next year will get better snow in the east it has to right? Good luck to you.


Bummer that spring arrived so abruptly this year. I only started skiing last year in the spring, and it was wonderful for a beginner. The warmer weather came on slowly and good conditions lingered on with beautifully groomed, firm and consistent granular snow and nearly deserted slopes. I got hooked on the sport right then. I had a great winter this year, but we were really looking forward to more spring skiing. No such luck, it seems.

Anyway, thanks for the freely offered advice and encouragement. And here's to a longer season next year.

 

post #16 of 16

Hey Cmick. Hope your summer went well. This years season is just around the corner eh?!

 

I watched your video from last spring and you got some good feed back.

Back seat- YES

Upper body rotation-Yes

Stiff legs-Yes

Let us not focus on the bad but rather get you going in a positive direction.

 

- Body position, think knees over the toes and shoulders over the knees. Bend and unbend your ankles, knees and hips evenly.      Hop turns could help you here.

.

-Turning of the legs, the turning effort should begin from the feet up. Allow the femur to rotate in the hip socket. Your legs turn but your body remains a more open to the down slope.

Practice this movement in a wedge turn(snow plow) stay foreword. Back bad.... watch the video below 

www.youtube.com/embed/384sDq2fAuy Ski Tips- wedge stop with Steve A.

 

- Balance on you down hill ski at the end of your turn.

By picking up the up hill ski at the end of the turn you will have no choice but to stand on the down hill one. Try it one turn at a time and find the happy balance spot. When you do you will know it.

www.youtube.com/embed/kXurUynaOgy Ski Tips - Tight Core with Steve A.

 

Best of luck and have a great season

Cheersbeercheer.gif

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Beginner Zone
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Beginner Zone › Video critique please!