EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Racing and Big Mountain Competitions › Newbie interested in racing Super G
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Newbie interested in racing Super G - Page 2

post #31 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rise To The Top View Post

Jay Peak is no where near a full DH. More like slower speed skiing. You actually have to turn when you get up to 80 in a full on DH. The only full on DH that you can get here in the East is with a FIS license at MSA, Sugarloaf, or Massif.
 


 

 

 

less turns but speed wise you can hit as fast there as any of them except perhaps Sugarloaf

 


Edited by ScotsSkier - 3/12/12 at 8:16pm
post #32 of 36

Sugar Mountain in NC typically has a 3-day race clinic in mid-Dec to kick off the season.  All ages from what I saw a couple years ago.  Cataloochee gave NASTAR a try this winter.  Meaning the course was set up for public runs for a small fee.

post #33 of 36

I've skied the Jay Peak Citizen's DH.  It seemed to me that terminal speed on that course wasn't as fast as just keeping my skis in the fall line at a number of other places.  (Mount Tremblant and Mt. Washington BC come to mind).  I will admit fast skiing is a lot safer on a closed course, and a lot easier too.

post #34 of 36

Loads of good advice here. The lucky guys(girls) are the ones who get to run more than one super g a season! With our Masters races here in Oz we get one and if the conditions arent conducive to speed and safety we may not even get that but the overiding feeling of all the racers, fast, slow, big, small is " Yee haa--I wannna do that again!" I ran my 1st s.g. on a pair of  193 Rossi Vipers and had a ball. Something that hasn't been mentioned so far is the difference between skiing this kind of course/terrain in regular ski gear compared to a speed suit. If you get to the point were you would like to "give it a go" in a speed suit don't be surprised at the jump in speed. The 1st time I wore a peed suit was in a fairly tame d.h. and I almost missed the 2nd corner it came at me so fast! I also get little time to train or practice so the progression goes something like this----1st traing run--"OOOH--that was a little sketchy--am I out of my depth?"  2nd run----"Hey, that felt way better". 3rd run---"ALL RIGHT!" I guess the old adage about walking before you can run is still apt but in the end, running is so much more fun and the more people we get running the better! 

post #35 of 36
There is a tremendous disparity here based on age of the participant. Normally speed events are part of the evolution of a junior racing career. The best ones may continue it into early adulthood briefly in college or a national ski team. To have adults coming to it in adulthood sounds sketchy at best and the older the person is when undertaking it the more foolhardy the mission. Probably best for non lifelong skiers without substantial racing experience in their youth to stick to Nastar or the occasional "town downhill". In the sixties in Sun Valley we had a progressive downhill race for silver, golden and diamond sun pendants. Each course was progressively harder and they were very much "real" downhills. The only helmets we wore were leather and you would actually train for the race as part of your ski school lesson. But that sort of high adrenaline, high risk organized activity has long ago been sued out of the culture. Masters speed skiing is pretty much confined to a small group of affluent people who live at major resorts in the Rockies and train full time as if they were kids. They are occasionally joined by former national class racers who are well familiar with the speed skiing environment. Definitely not a growth sport. In most parts of the country Masters racers who want to race speed race with the kids. I was just reading a ski review on here by a guy who thought he could race SG or DH on a pair of Stockli 162s! And this guy skis in the alps! There is just not a lot of comprehension about speed skiing out there. My advice would be to leave it to the kids. Dung
post #36 of 36

That was kind of my point, earlier. To an extent, you can try for anything you want, but you need to understand the steps you're going to have to take to get there.  And you're right about Masters speed events, because I'm one of that group...although I wouldn't exactly call us "affluent", we're just fully committed and don't mind spending disposable (and non-disposable) money on going too fast.

 

So if you want to race Super G, first make sure you're skiing is up to snuff, and then get into some tech events and get a feel for that before you really point 'em down. For example, in our Masters program this year, we had a newbie who's probably in her middle thirties. Hadn't skied in 13 years, but had pretty good basic skills.  Very fit...is a competitive 10K runner...and very focused. At the end of the season, she was poised to make a big move in Masters GS, and you can read her story here:

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/111959/back-to-basics

 

Next year or the year after, maybe, if she wants, she can start doing some free skiing on some big skis, maybe do some camps or training, maybe try one of the easier Masters SGs or DHs...although there really isn't such a thing, in Rocky Mountain Masters. But not before then...

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cascadung View Post

There is a tremendous disparity here based on age of the participant. Normally speed events are part of the evolution of a junior racing career. The best ones may continue it into early adulthood briefly in college or a national ski team. To have adults coming to it in adulthood sounds sketchy at best and the older the person is when undertaking it the more foolhardy the mission. Probably best for non lifelong skiers without substantial racing experience in their youth to stick to Nastar or the occasional "town downhill". In the sixties in Sun Valley we had a progressive downhill race for silver, golden and diamond sun pendants. Each course was progressively harder and they were very much "real" downhills. The only helmets we wore were leather and you would actually train for the race as part of your ski school lesson. But that sort of high adrenaline, high risk organized activity has long ago been sued out of the culture. Masters speed skiing is pretty much confined to a small group of affluent people who live at major resorts in the Rockies and train full time as if they were kids. They are occasionally joined by former national class racers who are well familiar with the speed skiing environment. Definitely not a growth sport. In most parts of the country Masters racers who want to race speed race with the kids. I was just reading a ski review on here by a guy who thought he could race SG or DH on a pair of Stockli 162s! And this guy skis in the alps! There is just not a lot of comprehension about speed skiing out there. My advice would be to leave it to the kids. Dung


 

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Racing and Big Mountain Competitions › Newbie interested in racing Super G