EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › DPS Wailer 112 RP for Resort Use
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

DPS Wailer 112 RP for Resort Use

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 

I spoted a pair of very slightly used DPS Wailer 112 RP hybrid skis with Marker F12 touring bindings for sale in my area.  I ski Western Canada resorts: Sunshine, Lake Louise, Fernie B.C.  I don't have the flexibility to hit up the good powder days, so I am mostly skiing in tracked up powder, packed powder and western hardpack conditions.  I would maybe do a handful of sidecountry/backcountry days a year with this type of setup.

 

The question is: Is this type of setup a good ski for 95% resort use in mixed/variable snow conditions in western Canada, or is setup overkill for this type of skiing?

post #2 of 25

That's what RP stands for: Resort Powder. These rule resort conditions.

post #3 of 25
Thread Starter 

I have read a lot of good things about this ski, but I am still a little skeptical on how well it performs on packed powder and hardpack type of conditions being 112mm underfoot.

post #4 of 25

Welcome to Epic. I'd suggest a search. There's a whole long thread on this ski, as well as an even longer thread over at TGR. More generally, you may be asking the wrong question. No 112 mm ski, especially one this lively and light, is going to excel on hardpack and ice. So the short answer is no, it won't be all that amazing on boilerplate. It bites in, because it's fairly stiff laterally, but it's too jouncy to feel like a wide carver. If that's important for you in a powder ski - some care more don't - then strongly suggest reading some reviews in our Gear Reviews Forum, such as Dawgcatching's thread on skis wider than 100 mm. Different skis have different strengths and weaknesses. Just like people...

post #5 of 25

After reading your description:

 

Quote:

 

I don't have the flexibility to hit up the good powder days, so I am mostly skiing in tracked up powder, packed powder and western hardpack conditions.  I would maybe do a handful of sidecountry/backcountry days a year with this type of setup.

 

I would say the RP112 might be a good choice.  I have a pair of Hybrid RP112s, and they are really fun and easy in the tracked-up powder and packed powder.  They will have no problem with :"western hardpack" ( I'm in Vermont, so my idea of hardpack is much different than the western folks ), but like Beyond says, the DPS RP112 is not a hardpack race carver, but it sounds like you want to mostly hit the softer and cut-up materials.  I don't think you would regret the RP112, and if, for some reason, you didn't like them, you could sell them again in a blink of an eye. They are an in-demand item.  I love mine to what is probably an unhealthy degree (you will find pictures of people sleeping with their DPS skis in bed in uncountable website forums and photo posts for a reason....try them and you might find out why...).  There are lots of other options out there, but if you find a pair of DPS RP112s gently used, you will find lots of days to like 'em.

 

post #6 of 25
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the feedback.

I realize that this isn't going to carve like a race ski.  I have read a ton of reviews and threads, and it does sound like it is quite capable on hardpack for a soft snow/powder oriented ski.  I do have a front side oriented ski sitting in the garage that I could keep around for crap snow days.  If I can get a good deal on them I might scoop them up.

Thanks again.

post #7 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post

Welcome to Epic. I'd suggest a search. There's a whole long thread on this ski, as well as an even longer thread over at TGR. More generally, you may be asking the wrong question. No 112 mm ski, especially one this lively and light, is going to excel on hardpack and ice. So the short answer is no, it won't be all that amazing on boilerplate. It bites in, because it's fairly stiff laterally, but it's too jouncy to feel like a wide carver. If that's important for you in a powder ski - some care more don't - then strongly suggest reading some reviews in our Gear Reviews Forum, such as Dawgcatching's thread on skis wider than 100 mm. Different skis have different strengths and weaknesses. Just like people...



+1

I have the Yvette and love it for my powder days but don't really consider it for my "resort" days unless we have fresh snow. 

 

post #8 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bird1807 View Post

I spotted a pair of very slightly used DPS Wailer 112 RP hybrid skis with Marker F12 touring bindings for sale in my area.

 

The question is: Is this type of setup a good ski for 95% resort use in mixed/variable snow conditions in western Canada, or is setup overkill for this type of skiing?


You folks that replied to this missed an important part of the question, it's not just the SKI, it's the SKI and BINDING SYSTEM. The Marker F12 Tour makes this system a BAD choice for what you are looking for.

 

 

post #9 of 25

What Whiteroom said.  If you're not planning to tour with these, swap the bindings.  On the plus side, the bindings are probably worth $150-200 if they're in decent shape.

post #10 of 25
I like my 112RP after finally getting them out for a couple of days. They are light and surfy, and as long as you drive them with good light touch and don't oversteer, they will reward you. I would not use them as a daily driver unless skiing soft 3D snow is what you live for and you cannot afford another ski. Do read dawgcatching's reviews, but beware that he is a lighter guy, so his impressions of the ski may not fully apply to you. I have him by 35 lb and often have different impressions from the demos.
I would replace the Tour with a more appropriate alpine binding.
post #11 of 25
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the feedback on the bindings - that was one of my concerns.  Based on more thought and feedback I decided not to buy this package.

I'm going to hijack my own post now and ask for feedback on what would be a good "one ski quiver" for resort use and maybe the odd sidecountry stint.  I am leaning towards more of a soft snow ski.  I am 5'11" and 155 lbs; I am more of a finesse skier than a hard charger.  I think I want more of a softer "playful" ski that likes to make tighter, quicker turns.  As mentioned, I ski Western Canada resorts.  I try not to spend a ton of time on groomers, but I like to do a little of everything: ski the edges of the runs, do some bumps, some tree skiing and get a little air off of small features.  I do have a 77 mm waist ski that I could hold onto for truely hardpack conditions. 

Any feedback would be appreciated.

post #12 of 25

Something like the Moment PB&J might fit the bill, playful, light and poppy bit stiff enough to hold an edge. If you want more surface area, PM Bros 179 Fats (110 mm) will have more of a traditional feel, but very light, rocker, great all-arounder. The K2 Obsethed is a classic freestyle pow ski, pretty soft, very versatile, not super light, but very friendly, likely to be cheaper right now than the first two. 

post #13 of 25

Bird - I'm thinking maybe something like the Blizzard The One.  You should be able to find a great deal on these and they are a very versatile ski.  They also are a ski that pulls off a nice trick - they're forgiving for "not so accomplished" skiers while also capable of really rewarding more talented pilots.  Everyone that rides The One always seem to come away smiling.

post #14 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noodler View Post

Bird - I'm thinking maybe something like the Blizzard The One.  You should be able to find a great deal on these and they are a very versatile ski.  They also are a ski that pulls off a nice trick - they're forgiving for "not so accomplished" skiers while also capable of really rewarding more talented pilots.  Everyone that rides The One always seem to come away smiling.



This is true, but I'll come at it from a slightly different angle ... we are often that same skier, from day to day (or morning to afternoon). It's nice to have a ski that won't kick your ass when you are taking it easy, but will keep up with you when you are on your game. And you mentioned possibly touring: it has a slider plate where you can mount different bindings on the same ski without drilling. 

post #15 of 25

Agree about the One, good luck finding any. Also agree with segbrown that our own skiing probably has more variance within a single day - or from one day to the next - than we realize. Some of it is fatigue, some is having to ease back (think skiing with family or friends who meander), some is changing up our own game for variety on a smaller mountain, some is shifting from one kind of terrain, say trees, to another, say icy groomers, just because that's what's out there. So a ski that's always wanting your A game can be as limiting as one that only needs a C game. 

post #16 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post


You folks that replied to this missed an important part of the question, it's not just the SKI, it's the SKI and BINDING SYSTEM. The Marker F12 Tour makes this system a BAD choice for what you are looking for.

 

 


Actually, because this ski is fairly stiff at the waist, putting a duke/baron/tour on them doesn't affect it to much. Of course, there's always going to be some tradeoffs with a frame binding, but on stiff skis it isn't as noticeable. Anyways, that's the way I'm going, and from the research I've done, I think it should be fine. Over on TGR, marshalolson has a few posts concerning this.

 

post #17 of 25

But if you're not touring, there's no reason to use a touring binding.

post #18 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheDad View Post

But if you're not touring, there's no reason to use a touring binding.


yes, definately. I'd still keep them on the ski, however, to do some sidecountry, but of course, if you're sure you won't be doing that, might as well stick with resort bindings, they will be better in a lot of ways.

 

post #19 of 25

I believe that was the point, not anything about inherent compatibility with the ski.

post #20 of 25

The Tour 12 is a very different little critter than the Duke. Marker is pretty clear in saying "this is for touring, not for resort use". That was my point. If you ski 90% inbounds and a ski has a binding that the manufacturer says isn't designed to take that abuse, then it is not compatible with your needs. Simple.

post #21 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

The Tour 12 is a very different little critter than the Duke. Marker is pretty clear in saying "this is for touring, not for resort use". That was my point. If you ski 90% inbounds and a ski has a binding that the manufacturer says isn't designed to take that abuse, then it is not compatible with your needs. Simple.



not trying to be annoying or anything, but actually many people are using the F12s as a resort binding. They tend to hold up better to resort abuse than touring itself, at least the first 10/11 iteration. There are people using them for 90% resort skiing, and they're holding up just fine, even though maybe that is a bit much. Anyway, just sayin.

post #22 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sigurd View Post



not trying to be annoying or anything, but actually many people are using the F12s as a resort binding. They tend to hold up better to resort abuse than touring itself, at least the first 10/11 iteration. There are people using them for 90% resort skiing, and they're holding up just fine, even though maybe that is a bit much. Anyway, just sayin.



It can be used but its not ideal, and if you know you're going to be doing that much resort skiing its better to go with something engineered for it. You're right though, they're not that brittle that its impossible to do or anything, I'd just rather use something beefier.

post #23 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by iKabrex View Post



It can be used but its not ideal, and if you know you're going to be doing that much resort skiing its better to go with something engineered for it. You're right though, they're not that brittle that its impossible to do or anything, I'd just rather use something beefier.


Yes, exactly. That's how I take it as well. It must be because you're from Canadawink.gif

 

post #24 of 25

 

Warning: Spoiler! (Click to show)

 

 

Quote:
I am 5'11" and 155 lbs; I am more of a finesse skier than a hard charger.

 

This also totally qualifies him to use the F12s, at least IMO.

post #25 of 25

^^^sorry about the spoiler^^^, don't know how to delete it after accidently inserting itredface.gif

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › DPS Wailer 112 RP for Resort Use