or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

BOOTS

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 

I need some new boots, and after experiencing major heel lift with laced boots, I was looking at speed lace or BOA. Celsius was having a sale on the Cirrus speed lace and the CLS speed lace. I can also get a pretty deal on Northwave legend speed lace. Anything like these click system or snap system boots and in the 130 and under price neighborhood... Any suggestions?

post #2 of 17

Spend the money, get a good set of boots. I know all the best boarders locally swear by Thirty-Two boots, they are comfy, perform well, and are durable. Speed lace is nice, BOA isn't. Laced boots still give the best, most precise fit.

post #3 of 17

^^^Please don't listen to that advice.

 

32 boots, last 32 days before they blow out.  Seriously one of the poorest made boots out there.  Only DC is worse.

 

All that said, find the boot that fits your foot.  The best made boot in the world is the biggest piece of crap if it doesn't fit.  I'd go with a pair of great fitting 32 boots over a poorly fitting pair of Salomons.  Even with my previous statement. 

 

The BOA system is pretty great, but only if you go with the Dual system.  It locks in and is easy to adjust.  Laces aren't and they stretch.  Most of the quick lace systems are pretty nice out there too and give you a nice fit.  Some people like the single BOA, but I do find it problematic getting the fit I want.  Nice thing with BOA boots is that you put them on ride, get the boot to pack out, and then take 2 seconds to re-tighten the fit to where you want. 

 

The only nice thing about laces is that they are fairly easy to find replacements for.  BOA is easy to replace, but you have to have the cable and that isn't always as available as snowboard laces are.  Quick lace systems tend to be a pain to replace and break slightly less more than traditional laces.  I am averaging about one BOA cable a season I have to replace.  If you do go BOA make sure you tighten up the cables after you take the boot off.  Leaving them loose makes it easier to kink them, therefore fraying and failure.  It also takes me about as long to replace a BOA cable as it does to replace laces.  So it is pretty quick to do. I wouldn't want to do it on the slope though. 

 

Celsius makes great boots and the Cirrus double BOA is a solid boot.  If it fits your foot.  Ride and K2 have really upped the game too. 

 

I have no idea on the quality of Northwave these days.  They used to be a top tier boot maker, but really fell off at the turn of the century.  Seems that they are trying to make a come back, not sure if they are. My gut feeling is that I would pass of NW for now.  You'll have to be the judge if you think their quality is decent or not. 

 

post #4 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by killclimbz View Post

 

Find the boot that fits your foot.  The best made boot in the world is the biggest piece of crap if it doesn't fit. 



/\/\ This! Who cares how cheap or expensive the boots are if they don't fit you right. Holding your heel down is part of the fit issue. Buying boots without trying them on is completely foolish.

 

I like my Malamutes. They fit me well. YMMV.

post #5 of 17
Thread Starter 

I live in ocean city MD so going somewhere to try on boots is 3hrs, and for a place that actually has a good selection, about 5hrs, so I was just wondering how true to size celsius is. Northwave I have tried and fits well, but not sure about quality. I have ruled out laces because of the major heel lift I have previously experienced. If I am going to buy the boa, it will be on sale because to start with they are more than speed lace, so if anyone knows of any actually good boa boots on sale, please tell me because spring break is approaching and I don't want to be stuck buying boots on the mountain.

post #6 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by killclimbz View Post

^^^Please don't listen to that advice.

 

32 boots, last 32 days before they blow out.  Seriously one of the poorest made boots out there.  Only DC is worse.


Really? I don't claim to know much about snowboard boots, but when our best boarders, the guys landing doubles in the park, get 5 years out of a pair of 32s and then buy another pair, that tells me that they are great quality. They claim they are the best made boots out there.

 

post #7 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by killclimbz View Post

^^^Please don't listen to that advice.

 

32 boots, last 32 days before they blow out.  Seriously one of the poorest made boots out there.  Only DC is worse.

 

All that said, find the boot that fits your foot.  The best made boot in the world is the biggest piece of crap if it doesn't fit.  I'd go with a pair of great fitting 32 boots over a poorly fitting pair of Salomons.  Even with my previous statement. 

 

 

I'm sure the low end boots from any manufacturer is going to fall apart quicker than the higher end boots.  I have a pair of high end DC boots and they're holding up as well or better than other brands I've ridden (Vans, K2).  DC makes boots for wider feet, and these boots are comfy once I have them laced up properly.  A few google searches should tell you in general which manufacturers will fit your foot type, then you can buy from backcountry.com or REI since that unlimited lifetime warranty will have you covered, and the sales are starting to get pretty good about now.

 

 

post #8 of 17

The Allegiance was their high end boot and quality wise it was a huge piece of crap.  Went through three pairs with less than 20 days on each.  The stitching was crap and the side walls would blow out.  DC has never been known for quality though.  Sorry, but that is not their strong point.  Either end of spectrum for them. 

 

32 is the second worst.  We got more guys landing doubles and triples on real man jumps than I care to count.  They could pull that off with crappy boots or great boots.  Really doesn't matter.  They mostly rock who ever is giving them free flow.  So what is your point?  32 is not known for durability.

 

Unfortunately as a whole, snowboard boots are not made as durable as they were in the 90's, so maybe I have no point anyway on that subject matter anyway...

post #9 of 17
Thread Starter 

Thank you guys but I found the Ride Insanos for about $150, which is like half off, and i had already sold my lace boots for about $50, so I am putting about $100 into $300 boots. My original plan was to get BOA boots but the price was over budget, so this was too good to pass. Thank you for suggestions and I guess I will stay away from 32 and DC in the future!

post #10 of 17

Ride Insanos are one of the better boots out there if they fit you.  Not a freestyler's boot though.  Things are very stiff.  I'd call them damn stiff.  The next step up is a ski boot. 

 

Overall though, it is a great free ride boot.  One of the lightest out there and the Intuition liner is nice. 

 

Hope it is a good choice for you.

post #11 of 17

what about nitro boots?

post #12 of 17

I have had very good luck with the DC Judge. The lower end DC boots could be lesser quality, but the Judge model has held up and treated me very well. They have no heel lift. The liners dont pack out much. They seem durable and well made. My feet stay warm and comfortable. They are on the stiffer side, but after 10 days or so they soften up. You can find last years model for 160 maybe less online.

 

Different brands will fit differently. I have wider feet with skinny ankles and calves, and of all the boots ive tried on over the years the Judge fits my foot/ankle the best.

 

One of the features you should look for reguardless of brand is a liner/ankle harness that is integrated to the shell of the boot. Higher end boots have this. In my opinion it makes a huge difference for heel lift as it gives a solid connection between your heel/liner/shell.

 

I am partial towards the dual zone boa boots. They are super easy to get on and off. They are easy to get as tight as you wish and they stay tight. They dont loosen throughout the day like lace boots (this has been my experience, but I havent used laced boots in 10 years). One potential downside to the dual zone boa boots is that most are on the stiffer side as KillClimbz mentioned with the insano.

post #13 of 17

I rode DC for 4 years. All high end: Judge, Allegiance and maybe one other early on. Every pair of boots had stitching or sole glue failure. They all fell apart! I however did like the performance of the boot before they failed. I am a fan of the dual boa. I like the ability to independently tighten the foot and leg. The heel hold in the "pump up" Bravo liner was the best I've ever experienced.

My present ride is Deeluxe Spark XV. I am early on days in the boot with only about 40 logged. The heel lift is nil. They tighten with quick pull laces and have independent foot and leg laces. They are warm and comfortable. I teach and ride all mountain. I am not a park rider. I have never met any one who truly rides and has owned the same boots for 5 years.

post #14 of 17

Riding the XV at the area?  I hope you are doing some splitting too.  That is a lot of boot for just at the ski area.  

post #15 of 17

No split board. In fact a torn ACL has me down right now. I am in management and spend a lot of time in my boots just walking. Well... I did until the ACL.

post #16 of 17
An year old post--fairly new... How come I haven't heard of any of these boots mentioned here except the Salomons. A whole different world here.
post #17 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bryan Davis View Post
 

No split board. In fact a torn ACL has me down right now. I am in management and spend a lot of time in my boots just walking. Well... I did until the ACL.

Lame.  Take care of that knee.  Sorry to hear that.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav: