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Quiver Overlap - a better solution.

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Many of us here are well aquainted with the benefits of having a quiver of skis.  We have skis for hard-pack, skis for powder, etcetera.  We all know very well that even if you only ski boiler plate, you still need a short radius ski, a gs ski and a speed ski. 

 

However, some of us have made purchases to fill gaps in our quivers when we came across a good deal.  For example, we may have bought a gs ish ski because we thought it would have better edge hold that the gs ish ski we had, only to discover it was a little too lively and not quite solid enough at higher gs speeds.  Normally the solution would be easy - just sell it off.  However, what if the ski is a lot of fun within its speed range, with lots of energy and pop when skied aggressively.  What if the other gs ski is too good at somewhat higher speeds over rough terrain to get rid of (stable, dependable, won't fold up on you, lets you get away with some errors, and lively once up to speed), despite it's lack of ice grip?   That's just one example, I'm sure you can think of others, or have others in your quiver.

 

Say you have three designated hard to medium snow skis all in the same 21 to 27 m turn radius.  Instead of selling two of them,  wax one for warm wet snow, the other for medium temperatures and the third for cold.   Now you are able to get up in the morning and bring the ski with the right wax on it the moring of, without having to guess the weather in advance or scheduling early morning waxing.

post #2 of 9

Not sure.........I have a set of skis that I would only use in certain circumstances, and I'm debating whether to sell them.  They COULD come in handy, but it might be better to get the cash and put that towards skis that would be more versatile, better all-around, or something that I would actually use more regularly.  

 

I got them for a good price, but they're a bit too niche I think. I might want to get more use out of a set than have them generally collect dust, waiting for that "perfect" situation to use them.

post #3 of 9

I'm not sold into the whole "quiver idea" I understand for a lot of power that a power ski would be more fun, but on the east coast it is such a rarity that one mid 80's ski seems to do the job in most situations. I don't race so I don't need a ski for that. The ski i have has enough edge grip for boilerplate conditions and I know no matter what I find on the mountain I am going to have a blast on the skis I'm on. I have an older ski w/ a 70 waist but I don't really see the need to ever bring it to the mountain anymore.

post #4 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eastcoastdad View Post

I'm not sold into the whole "quiver idea" I understand for a lot of power that a power ski would be more fun, but on the east coast it is such a rarity that one mid 80's ski seems to do the job in most situations. I don't race so I don't need a ski for that. The ski i have has enough edge grip for boilerplate conditions and I know no matter what I find on the mountain I am going to have a blast on the skis I'm on. I have an older ski w/ a 70 waist but I don't really see the need to ever bring it to the mountain anymore.



Why that's just crazy talk.....  wink.gif

 

post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnerbob View Post

Not sure.........I have a set of skis that I would only use in certain circumstances, and I'm debating whether to sell them.  They COULD come in handy, but it might be better to get the cash and put that towards skis that would be more versatile, better all-around, or something that I would actually use more regularly.  

 

I got them for a good price, but they're a bit too niche I think. I might want to get more use out of a set than have them generally collect dust, waiting for that "perfect" situation to use them.



What ski and niche is it?

post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eastcoastdad View Post

I'm not sold into the whole "quiver idea" I understand for a lot of power that a power ski would be more fun, but on the east coast it is such a rarity that one mid 80's ski seems to do the job in most situations. I don't race so I don't need a ski for that. The ski i have has enough edge grip for boilerplate conditions and I know no matter what I find on the mountain I am going to have a blast on the skis I'm on. I have an older ski w/ a 70 waist but I don't really see the need to ever bring it to the mountain anymor

Enough with the crazy talk!wink.gif 

 

I too have a blast on whatever i'm on, but I know what I'm missing too.

There is now way you can enjoy tight slalom turns on a gs ski, and sl skis just don't arc as cleanly as gs or sg skis when you get past the turn size you can pull at 30 mph, so you need a quiver. 

 

Also, there is no way you can make a sudden transition due to an instant decision and direction change on a ski that is 80+ mm wide. 

post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eastcoastdad View Post

I'm not sold into the whole "quiver idea" I understand for a lot of power that a power ski would be more fun, but on the east coast it is such a rarity that one mid 80's ski seems to do the job in most situations. I don't race so I don't need a ski for that. The ski i have has enough edge grip for boilerplate conditions and I know no matter what I find on the mountain I am going to have a blast on the skis I'm on. I have an older ski w/ a 70 waist but I don't really see the need to ever bring it to the mountain anymore.


You're on the Kendo, right?  I just got mine mounted and haven't yet tried them out (kids birthday parties and things have made it impossible to get out).  In all my years of skiing, I've never had more than one pair of usable skis, and don't really get this whole quiver thing either.  I used to have a blast on my 63mm waist skis in all conditions, I can't imagine an 88mm not being even more useful. I guess it would be good to have a pair for epic powder, but other than that, ski what you have and enjoy, right?

 

 

post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eastcoastdad View Post

I'm not sold into the whole "quiver idea" I understand for a lot of power that a power ski would be more fun, but on the east coast it is such a rarity that one mid 80's ski seems to do the job in most situations. I don't race so I don't need a ski for that. The ski i have has enough edge grip for boilerplate conditions and I know no matter what I find on the mountain I am going to have a blast on the skis I'm on. I have an older ski w/ a 70 waist but I don't really see the need to ever bring it to the mountain anymore.


You're on the Kendo, right?  I just got mine mounted and haven't yet tried them out (kids birthday parties and things have made it impossible to get out).  In all my years of skiing, I've never had more than one pair of usable skis, and don't really get this whole quiver thing either.  I used to have a blast on my 63mm waist skis in all conditions, I can't imagine an 88mm not being even more useful. I guess it would be good to have a pair for epic powder, but other than that, ski what you have and enjoy, right?

 

 

post #9 of 9

Pfftt, overlap of 21-27m r?  I've known a couple of OCD racers that would bring two or three pair of IDENTICAL skis to the mountain that had slightly different tunes under them.

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